Entertainment

Selena Tribute Concert Postponed Until Further Notice

It has been 25 years since Selena Quintanilla was killed by Yolanda Saldívar. Since then, Selena’s fandom has continued to grow as younger generations have discovered her music. In honor of the late singer, a tribute concert was planned for May 9. Now, in response to the COVID-19 outbreak, the concert has been postponed until further notice.

Update March 26, 2:00 p.m.: Selena 25m a tribute concert, has been postponed.

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𝐓𝐈𝐂𝐊𝐄𝐓 𝐑𝐄𝐅𝐔𝐍𝐃 𝐍𝐎𝐓𝐈𝐂𝐄⁣ ⁣ Due to the current COVID-19 situation, the Selena XXV concert will be rescheduled to a future date. ⁣ ⁣ Please hold on to your tickets, as they will be honored for the rescheduled concert date.⁣ ⁣ REFUND REQUESTS FOR SELENA XXV SHOULD BE MADE AT THE ORIGINAL POINT OF PURCHASE⁣ ⁣ For tickets purchased through Ticketmaster, please contact Fan Support at 800-653-8000. Tickets purchased at the Alamodome will be refunded at the Box Office (M-F, 10 AM – 5 PM).⁣ ⁣ Please note that Alamodome Box Office hours are subject to change per current COVID-19 guidelines. For tickets purchased through a third-party vendor, please contact the seller.⁣ ⁣ 💜 ⁣ ⁣ 𝐀𝐕𝐈𝐒𝐎 𝐃𝐄 𝐑𝐄𝐄𝐌𝐁𝐎𝐋𝐒𝐎 𝐃𝐄𝐋 𝐁𝐎𝐋𝐄𝐓𝐎⁣ ⁣ Debido a la situación actual de COVID-19, el concierto de Selena XXV se reprogramará para una fecha futura.⁣ ⁣ Guarde sus boletos, ya que serán honrados por la fecha reprogramada del concierto.⁣ ⁣ LAS SOLICITUDES DE REEMBOLSO PARA SELENA XXV DEBEN REALIZARSE EN EL PUNTO ORIGINAL DE COMPRA⁣ ⁣ Para los boletos comprados a través de Ticketmaster, comuníquese con Fan Support al 800-653-8000. Los boletos comprados en el Alamodome serán reembolsados en la taquilla (de lunes a viernes de 10 a.m. a 5 p.m.).⁣ ⁣ Tenga en cuenta que las horas de taquilla de Alamodome están sujetas a cambios según las pautas actuales de COVID-19. Para boletos comprados a través de un proveedor externo, comuníquese con el vendedor.

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“There are very uncertain times ahead given the nature of what’s going on right now. Our family truly understands everyone’s concerns about the COVID-19 virus. We’ve spent the past several days monitoring the situation and we feel that rescheduling the tribute concert for Selena is in the best interest of everyone,” Suzette Quintanilla said in a statement. “Rescheduling will give people time to feel more comfortable and bring calm and ease during this unprecedented time. We will continue to monitor the situation to select the best and most responsible date to ensure the safety of everyone coming to the event. It will still be held in San Antonio, Texas at the Alamodome.⁣

Music is taking a moment to honor Selena with a 25th-year tribute concert.

SelenaXXV is happening at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. The concert is bringing together some of the biggest names in Latin music to give fans a night to remember centered around La Reina of Tejano music.

The concert is happening on Saturday, May 9 in San Antonio because texas is the only place to have this concert.

Selena’s place in Latin music history is undeniable. She was the first major Latina musician to start breaking down barriers for future Latino artists to rise in mainstream music. Her crossover songs brought our culture and experience to mainstream music audiences.

Here are a few of the artists you can expect to see at the SelenaXXV concert:

Pitbull

There’s no way you can have a tribute concert to a Latin music legend without Mr. Worldwide. The Cuban musician has spent his career bettering his community and giving Latino representation around the world. Who better to keep the hyped energy for the concert that Pitbull?

Los Tucanes de Tijuana

We are definitely feeling this norteño take on Selena’s classics. The band is wildly popular for their solid and incredible norteño sound and we can only imagine what they will prepare to honor Selena. Mexican legends giving praise to a Mexican-American legend is everything.

Becky G

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Team work make the dream work. 😉🤍

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The Inglewood native already showed her respect and love for Selena during her last concert in Texas. The singer belted out a beautiful rendition of “Dreamin’ of You,” one of Selena’s most famous songs. It just seems like a natural choice to have Becky G back in San Antonio for more Selena tributes.

Ally Brooke

The former Fifth Harmony band member took the stage during the 2019 Miss Universe pageant to sing a medley of Selena’s songs. Fans of the pageant and of Selena were ecstatic that Selena was getting some recognition during one of the biggest pageants in the world.

You can find out all of the details and where to buy tickets to show here.

Who else is buying tickets to see the show?

READ: 25 Years After Her Death, A San Antonio Art Museum Is Displaying Some Never-Before-Seen Photos Of Selena

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A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

Culture

A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

UTSA

The University of Texas San Antonio is bringing the history of Mexico into our kitchens. The university is releasing cookbooks that are collections of historic Mexican recipes. Right now, the desserts book is out and online for free. Main dishes and appetizers/drinks are coming soon.

You can now taste historic Mexico thanks to the University of Texas San Antonio.

UTSA has had an ongoing project of preserving, collecting, and digitizing cookbooks from throughout Mexico’s history. Some books date back to the 1700s and offer a look into Mexico’s culinary arts and its evolution.

UTSA has been digitizing Mexican cookbooks for years and the work is now being collected for people in the time of Covid.

Millions of us are still at home and projects like these can be very exciting and exactly what you need. The recipes are a way to distract yourself from the current reality.

“The e-pubs allow home cooks to use the recipes as inspiration in their own kitchens,” Dean Hendrix, the dean of UTSA Libraries, said in UTSA Today. “Our hope is that many more people will not only have access to these wonderful recipes but also interact with them and experience the rich culture and history contained in the collection.”

The free downloads are a way for people to get a very in-depth look into Mexican food history.

The first of three volumes of the cookbooks focuses on desserts so you can learn how to make churros, chestnut flan, buñelos, and rice pudding. What better way to spend your quarantine than learning how to make some of these yummy desserts. We all love sweets, right?

If you want to get better with making your favorite desserts, check out this cookbook and make it happen.

There is nothing better than diving into your history and using food as your guide. Food is so intrinsically engrained in our DNAs and identities. We love the foods and sweets from our childhood because they hold a clue as to who we are and where we come from. This historical collection of recipes throughout history is the perfect way to make that happen.

READ: The Laziest Food Hacks In All Of The Land Would Send Your Abuela To The Chancla

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One Year Later, The Latino Community Remembers The El Paso Shooting

Things That Matter

One Year Later, The Latino Community Remembers The El Paso Shooting

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On August 3, 2019, a man entered a Walmart in El Paso, Texas and killed 23 customers and injured 23 more. The shooter, Patrick Crusius, went to the Walmart with the expressed purpose of killing Mexican and Mexican-Americans. One year later, the community is remembering those lost.

One year ago today, a man killed 23 people in an El Paso Walmart targeting our community.

The Latino community was stunned when Patrick Crusius opened fire and killed 23 people in El Paso, Texas. The gunman wrote a manifesto and included his desire to kill as many Mexicans and Mexican-Americans he could in the El Paso Walmart. The days after were filled with grieving the loss of 23 people and trying to understand how this kind of hate could exist in our society.

Representative Veronica Escobar, who represents El Paso, is honoring the victims today.

Rep. Escobar was on the scene shortly after the shooting to be there for her community. The shooting was a reminder of the dangers of the anti-Latino and xenophobic rhetoric that the Trump administration was pushing for years.

“One year ago, our community and the nation were shocked and heartbroken by the horrific act of domestic terrorism fueled by racism and xenophobia that killed 23 beautiful souls, injured 22, and devasted all of us,” Rep. Escobar said in a statement. “Today will be painful for El Pasoans, especially for the survivors and the loved ones of those who were killed, but as we grieve and heal together apart, we must continue to face hate with love and confront xenophobia by treating the stranger with dignity and hospitality.”

El Pasoans are coming together today to remember the victims of the violence that day.

Latinos are a growing demographic that will soon eclipse the white communities in several states. Some experts in demographic shifts understand that this could be a terrifying sign for the white population. These changing demographics give life to racist and hateful ideologies.

“When you have a few people of color, the community is not seen so much as a threat,” Maria Cristina Morales, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Texas at El Paso, told USA Today about the fear of changing demographics. “But the more that the population grows – the population of Latinos grow for instance – the more fear that there’s going to be a loss of power.”

The international attack is still felt today because of the constant examples of white supremacy still active today.

“It doesn’t occur to you that there’s a war going on, and there’s always been a war going on—the helicopters the barbed wire—but you just kind of didn’t see it,” David Dorado Romo, an El Paso historian who lost a friend in the shooting, told Time Magazine.

The sudden reminder of the hate out there towards the Latino community was felt nationwide that day. The violent attack that was planned out revealed the true cost of that hate that has been pushed by some politicians.

“El Paso families have the right to live free from fear, and I will continue to honor the victims and survivors with action,” Rep. Escobar said in her statement. “Fighting to end the gun violence and hate epidemics that plague our nation.”

READ: As El Paso Grieves Their Loss, Here Is Everything We Know About The Victims Of The El Paso Massacre, Which Were Mostly Latino

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