Entertainment

Tens Years After Its World Cup Debut, Shakira’s ‘Waka Waka’ Video Crosses 2.5 Billion Views On YouTube

It’s been ten years since Shakira released “Waka Waka (This Time for Africa)” but the gifts for the song keep on giving.

At the time of its release, the song by the Colombian singer-songwriter peaked at number one on record charts of fifteen different countries. Ten years later, Shakira and her fans are celebrating the news on how the “Waka Waka” video just crossed 2.5 billion views on YouTube.

The singer shared the news with her fans on Instagram and Twitter.

The “Magia” singer wrote in a tweet “You guys really are amazing. Thank you!”

Shakira released the beloved song during the inauguration of FIFA World Cup which was held in South Africa in 2010.

At the time, the song was announced as the official 2010 FIFA World Cup Song. Shakira wrote and produced the song with the help of her previous collaborator, American record producer John Hill and the South African Afro-fusion band, Freshlyground. The singer had been inspired by the words “waka waka” used in the song from “Zangaléwa,” a 1986 ballad by a Cameroonian band called Golden Sounds. The song, “Zangaléwa” had been a hit across Africa as well as Colombia.

Watch the Waka video below.

Check out the Waka Waka video below.

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People Are Living For The Weeknd’s Spanish Skills On Maluma’s ‘Hawái’ But Apparently Not His Dance Moves

Entertainment

People Are Living For The Weeknd’s Spanish Skills On Maluma’s ‘Hawái’ But Apparently Not His Dance Moves

Maluma / Instagram

While many of us were eagerly awaiting the results of a wildly heated presidential election, many more were waiting to find out what the collab between Maluma and The Weeknd was all about.

Thankfully, fans didn’t have to wait long.

Over the weekend, Maluma and The Weeknd surprised fans with their incredible remix of Maluma’s “Hawái” off his album Papi Juancho. The duo sing together in Spanglish and the music video has people asking all kinds of questions.

The Weeknd is getting tons of love for singing in ‘Spanglish’ on a remix of Maluma’s “Hawái.”

After lighting up social media with an Instagram post that hinted at a possible collaboration, Maluma and The Weeknd launched a remix that had fans of both artists waiting in anticipation.

Turns out the long awaited project was a remix of Maluma’s song “Hawái” from his Papi Juancho album, which he surprise released back in August. The Weeknd now brings his R&B voice to the first verse of the track, singing in a dimly lit club in the music video. It all seems like an extension of his After Hours universe, until he begins singing in Spanish.

During the song, you can hear the Canadian artist sing a few lines in Spanish after opening the remix singing in English.

In the first two hours since the remix was posted on YouTube, the collaboration reached 750,000 views.

The “Hawái” remix is The Weeknd’s second collaboration in less than a week, after he teamed up with Ariana Grande to duet “off the table” on her latest album, positions.

Maluma seems as excited about the remix as his fans are.

Credit: Maluma / Instagram

In a press release for the remix, Maluma said, “I have always admired The Weeknd so it feels nothing short of a dream come true to have him collab on ‘Hawái’. He brought another flow to it and sang in both Spanish and English which is impressive.”

“Bro, he killed it, because he’s a real artist,” Maluma told Apple Music’s Zane Lowe. “He’s a real artist, man, what he did in this song. For him, it was like he was doing reggaeton for his whole life. And I knew that his voice in the song could work amazing. And that’s what happened.”

Maluma continued, “At the beginning, when I listened to the first verse when he just started the song… I was like, ‘Bro, this sounds like The Weeknd’s song.’ I couldn’t believe how good it was mixing his vocals with my vocals. And man, yeah, I’m blessed. I’m very happy. This is a huge moment for the Latin culture though.”

But apparently fans are questioning the rapper’s dancing abilities.

Although people are not entirely happy with the song. Many on Twitter pointed out that the Spanish is fine, but the dancing is unexpectedly dorky, especially compared to the Papi Juancho himself, still oozing sex appeal all over the place.

Some were just upset by the whole thing…

Another Twitter user posted a message in which she wrote “Me listening to the Hawaii remix with The Weekend “accompanied by a photo of a visibly uncomfortable child.

What do you think of the remix? How are The Weeknd’s dance moves?

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Bad Bunny Talks New Music And His Future In Reggaetón In A Powerful New Interview

Entertainment

Bad Bunny Talks New Music And His Future In Reggaetón In A Powerful New Interview

Kevin Mazur / Getty Images

So much of this year has been spent inside our apartments singing and dancing to Bad Bunny hits like “Safaera” and “Yo Perreo Sola” or looking through countless magazines that made him their cover boy.

It seems that 2020 is peak Bad Bunny, as the reggaetónero takes over the world bringing us hit after hit while bringing perreo into the mainstream.

Now, in his latest cover story in The Culture Issue of the New York Times, San Benito gives us insight into what his 2020 has been like, what we can expect from him in the not so distant future and what being a Puerto Rican super star means to him.

Bad Bunny is taking over the world and his latest interview with the New York Times details just how he plans to do it.

‘The World According to Bad Bunny’ – that is what graces the cover of the New York Times’ latest Culture Issue. And it catches your eye – his full face, including his now signature mustache – force you to do a double take to soak in all of his glory. Or maybe that was just my reaction…

Benito Antonio Martínez Ocasio — more popularly known as Bad Bunny, San Benito, El Conejo Malo — is the reggaetónero we’ve all fallen in love with and who is topping charts throughout the world. 

His latest feature story covers everything from his love for Puerto Rico to his next album, but it’s also another major step for the artist in putting both is home and the Latino community on the world stage.

His profile begins with Bad Bunny discussing his album YHLQMDLG, which begins with the song “Si Veo a Tu Mamá”, which has a verse we can all relate to in 2020: “maldito Año Nuevo” (or “this damn new year”). But despite all the BS that 2020 has thrown our way, Bad Bunny has managed to shine through by being an advocate when it comes to so many issues.

Bad Bunny says he feels like an “athlete representing his Puerto Rico at the Olympics.“

San Benito has made it his mission to put his homeland on the map and to showcase to the world the problems that Boricuas face on the island. In the interview, Bad Bunny describes himself as an athlete representing Puerto Rico in the Olympics.

Those problems he speaks of include the island’s status as a commonwealth territory of the U.S. which means its citizens on the island cannot vote for president or have any voting representatives in Congress. 

The natural disasters of Hurricane Maria, Irma and the earthquakes that rung in 2020 also add to the laundry list of problems, and also came with little financial help from Trump’s federal government, which has left Puerto Rico in a vulnerable state to this day.

In language, Caribbean Spanish like that of Puerto Rico is heavily criticized by the so-called sophisticated Latin Americans, but they all bop their heads to Bad Bunny tunes like “Safaera,” “La Romana,” and more.

So many of us love Bad Bunny for his constant activism and he doesn’t disappoint in this NYT piece.

Bad Bunny is known for breaking cultural stereotypes, shattering boundaries others couldn’t dream of, and advocating for women. He’s even openly talked about depression, and shown the world it is okay not to feel okay.

His activism has also shown support for the trans community with the video “Yo Perreo Sola,” dressed in drag, or when he’s done public appearances wearing a skirt and a shirt that read “mataron a alexa, no a un hombre en falda.”

However, in the wake of George Floyd’s murder, Benito was suspiciously mute — no posts on social media, no interviews. He seemed to have disappeared at a moment that so many of us could of benefited from his compassion. Many criticized the singer for his silence.

But on June 12, a TIME article was published about him speaking out, through email exchanges, and how he did not want to just send a basic message, but rather go deeper to “support the fight against a systematic monster that’s been [around for] centuries.”

Bad Bunny also speaks out about reggaetón’s black roots – which so often go unmentioned.

Credit: Kevin Mazur / Getty Images

As for inspirations, Benito called out the prominent Black stars who helped shape reggaetón into the phenomenon that is it today. He admits that’s something he’s still learning about. “As a child, for better or worse, I always lived in my bubble,” Benito says. “Now, I could say – and people do say – it’s a form of privilege. But it’s always been my way of being. Me, in my house and in my bubble, imagining a better, more magical world.”

As he ascends into the pop mainstream, Bad Bunny also opens up about returning reggaetón to its Puerto Rican roots on his album YHLQMDLG. “Since reggaetón went pop all over the world, I don’t feel like people really know the sound that raised me, that I grew up studying,” he says. “This is the album I would’ve wanted to release when I was 15 and dreamed of being a singer.” Benito also hints to the next project, adding, “My next album doesn’t have anything to do with YHLQMDLG.”

It’s a long interview but, come on, it’s with Bad Bunny so the entire interview is worth the read. You can check out the NYT piece here.

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