Entertainment

Netflix Cancelled ‘One Day At A Time,’ But Season 4 Will Premiere On Pop TV In March

Fans of the Netflix series One Day at a Time were likely disappointed to learn that the streaming service cancelled the show after its third season. But if you count yourself as an enthusiast, you’re probably doing a little happy dance at the news that the show will appear on basic cable TV this spring—the first time a cable network has revived a cancelled streaming series and kept it from disappearing into the ether. Pop TV announced that Season 4 of One Day at a Time will launch on Tuesday, March 24 at 9:30/8:30 CT, and the network released the following sneak peek at what’s to come:

“This season will find Penelope exploring a surprising relationship, her mother Lydia experiencing a religious crisis (as well as revealing the details of her surprise trip to Cuba with Dr. Berkowitz), and Schneider finding his relationship with Avery growing deeper. Meanwhile, Elena begins to prepare for college and Alex starts to date.”

Lots to look forward to! But as we prepare for the next iteration of the show, why don’t we take a quick look at its history? How did One Day at a Time begin, and how did it evolve into a beloved reflection of contemporary Latinx family life?

One Day at a Time first aired back in 1975, centering on a white family—a single mom and two kids, just like the current version—who lived in Indianapolis, rather than LA. It was based on the experience of Whitney Blake, one of the show’s creators, as a single mom (which, at the time, was pretty revolutionary—single parenthood was not nearly as common as it is today!). The original show explored the family’s life in the midst of divorce, something that was still pretty taboo in that era, and although it was a sitcom steeped in laughs and levity, it also highlighted the difficulties of navigating the world as a single mother.

Fast forward to 2017. One Day at a Time reemerges on Netflix, and while the same basic storyline is still there, the aura of the show is totally different (and a lot more complex). Instead of focusing on a white family, the new One Day at a Time follows the story of Penelope Alvarez, a US Army Nurse Corps veteran who struggles with her return to civilian life. Alvarez separates from her husband, who had also served in the army, due to erratic behavior caused by alcoholism and PTSD—but Alvarez herself also suffers from PTSD, a conflict that adds an important dimension to the show by offering a glimpse into a mental health reality that affects large swaths of people yet is often overlooked. So, Penelope Alvarez must not simply face the challenges of single motherhood: she must also battle with the lingering trauma of combat, all while trying to manage the stresses of quotidian life in a Cuban-American family.

One Day at a Time has been lauded for its authentic portrayal of relevant social questions that are of particular importance to the Latinx community—from immigration to LGBTQ issues, One Day at a Time gracefully addresses a wide spectrum of topical concerns.

Credit: Netflix

It’s true: One Day at a Time features characters facing the intense process of applying for citizenship. It shares the story of a character who doesn’t want to celebrate her quinceañera, who ruminates about the right time to tell her family she’s queer. It challenges gender expectations by introducing its audience to non-binary characters. In certain ways, it mirrors the original series in its willingness to address sensitive yet important issues that resemble the lives of people all over the US. Perhaps that’s part of why it’s been so well-received, and why Pop TV is willing to give it another chance.

Regarding the show’s resurrection on regular network TV, Brad Schwartz, President of Pop TV, said the following in a statement: “The enthusiastic response from fans since announcing our new season of One Day at a Time has been thrilling. “The series is more important than ever with its unmatched ability to tackle topical social issues through the lens of a relatable, loving family. The exceptionally talented team behind and in front of the camera make us proud to have One Day at a Time at home at Pop TV.”

The cast is totally lovable, super talented, and deeply engaging—so much of the praise for this show surrounds the fabulous actors at the helm. It’s been called “timely and tender,” “flat-out terrific,” “old fashioned and surprisingly new-fashioned,” and if you haven’t yet tuned in to this critically acclaimed series, make sure you catch up on Seasons 1-3 before the new season premieres in March!

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Latinas Share Why They Wanted To Teach Their Children Their Native Language

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Latinas Share Why They Wanted To Teach Their Children Their Native Language

Stephen Dunn / Getty

In a world with so much rising intersectionality and access to language tools, many still feel that passing along the traditions of their languages is necessary. Studies have shown for decades that children who grow up in an environment where they’re exposed to different languages have a pathway ahead of them that is full of promise. Particularly when it comes to education and career opportunities.

But why else do some parents find it essential to teach their children their family’s native languages?

Recently, we asked Latinas why learning their native language is important to them.

Check out the answer below!

“So they can be a voice for others in their community .” –_saryna_


“Besides the fact that bilingual kids use more of their brains. I’d like to teach my baby my native language so they can feel closer to our roots and be able to communicate/connect with our community not just in the US, but in Latin America too.” –shidume

“So that when the opportunity arises they can pursue their endeavors with nothing holding them back!” –candymtz13


“It not only helps them be multilingual, but also reminded them of their ancestry. Their roots. It builds a certain connection that cannot be broken.”-yeimi_herc


“So they can communicate with their grandparents, so they have double the opportunities growing up so they know their roots. So many reasons.”
elizabethm_herrera

“Know where you came from, being bilingual for more job opportunities later, being able to communicate with family members.”- panabori25

“I don’t have children but I think a language is tied to the culture. For me Spanish is a direct representation of how romantic and dramatic and over the top in the most beautiful way latin culture is. Also I’m Dominican and we just blend and make up words which really represents how crazy my family is.” –karenmarie15


“If I don’t and they lose ties to their people meaning my family who only speaks Spanish and Italian than I myself am harming them. As a preschool teacher I always tell parents English will happen eventually that’s the universal language but teach them their home home language the one that grandma/pa and the rest of the family speaks. They lose their identity. Sure they make up their own eventually but they must never forget where they come from.” –ta_ta1009


“So he doesn’t lose the connection to his grandmother and great grandfather who only speak spanish. So if he ever hears someone struggling to communicate he can help and feel a sense of pride in his roots/culture. 🇸🇻 plus 🤞🤞 I want him to pick up a 3rd language too!” –cardcrafted

“To give them more opportunities in life. I feel that some stories can only be told with authenticity when they’re in their native language. If you have the opportunity to do so, please do.” –titanyashigh

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Michelle Obama Recalled A Moment When Chicago Cops Accused Her Brother Of Stealing His Own Bike When He Was Just 10

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Michelle Obama Recalled A Moment When Chicago Cops Accused Her Brother Of Stealing His Own Bike When He Was Just 10

Paul Morigi / Getty

As most Black families in the United States know, growing up as a Black person is seen as a great threat in and of itself.

In a country where the rate of fatal police shootings among Black Americans is higher than that for any other ethnicity, it’s no wonder that this is true. Or, why learning to handle the police while Black is a lesson taught so prominently beneath the roofs of Black households.

In a recent episode of her podcast, Michelle Obama revealed that she and her brother Craig Robinson learned this lesson years ago in a confrontation with the police.

Speaking with her brother in her podcast, Obama recalled the day Robinson was accused of stealing his own bike.

Speaking with her brother, a former basketball coach, and her mother Marian Robinson about childhood and parenting, Obama brought up a moment in which Craig was stopped by a couple of police officers while riding his bike.

At the time, Robinson was about 10 or 11 years old and had been gifted the yellow ten-speed Goldblatt by his parents. While riding the bike, a police officer grabbed hold of it and refused to let go despite Craig’s pleas and protests that the bike was his.

“I was like ‘Oh, you got this all wrong, this is my bike. Don’t worry, this isn’t a stolen bike,’ and [the cop] would not believe me, and I was absolutely heartbroken. And I finally said to him, ‘Listen, you can take me to my house, and I will prove to you, this is my bike,” Robinson recalled.

Fortunately, Obama’s mother was home at the time and ushered Craig inside of the house, while she dealt with the police. As her son recalls, “she had that tight lip” as she confronted the officers who had accused her son of stealing his own bike.

Robinson revealed that she discovered the officers were friends with the people who had made the complaint about Craig stealing the bicycle and demanded they come to her house so that they could “admit [they] made a serious mistake.”

Robinson described the experience as a “heartbreaking” one at various times throughout the interview.

“I could tell [the cops] were trying to ask me questions that would trip me up,” he recalled. “If I wasn’t so sure that that bike was mine and showed any kind of reticence, I could see them taking me off to the police station, not calling mom until after I’ve been, you know, booked or whatever they do.”

At one point, Obama remarked that the story is particularly familiar with ones being experienced across the country, even today. “Nobody thinks about, you know, the fact that we all come from good families that are trying to teach values, but when you leave the safety of your home and go out into the street, where being Black is, is a crime in and of itself, we have all had to learn how to operate outside of our homes with a level of caution, and fear, because you never know,” she recalled

Obama’s mother also described the experience as being “part of a culture” among police.

“Because those two policemen were Black. And they were acting exactly the same as any other policeman,” her mother remarked. “It’s almost like, this is what they thought they were, how they were thought they were supposed to act.”

All three family members noted how the incident is so familiar today. Despite the fact that decades have passed. “That’s the perfect example of what all of these young, Black people are dealing with now, because this was, almost fifty years ago?” Craig Robinson said.

Listen to the clip from the podcast here.

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