Entertainment

Netflix Cancelled ‘One Day At A Time,’ But Season 4 Will Premiere On Pop TV In March

Fans of the Netflix series One Day at a Time were likely disappointed to learn that the streaming service cancelled the show after its third season. But if you count yourself as an enthusiast, you’re probably doing a little happy dance at the news that the show will appear on basic cable TV this spring—the first time a cable network has revived a cancelled streaming series and kept it from disappearing into the ether. Pop TV announced that Season 4 of One Day at a Time will launch on Tuesday, March 24 at 9:30/8:30 CT, and the network released the following sneak peek at what’s to come:

“This season will find Penelope exploring a surprising relationship, her mother Lydia experiencing a religious crisis (as well as revealing the details of her surprise trip to Cuba with Dr. Berkowitz), and Schneider finding his relationship with Avery growing deeper. Meanwhile, Elena begins to prepare for college and Alex starts to date.”

Lots to look forward to! But as we prepare for the next iteration of the show, why don’t we take a quick look at its history? How did One Day at a Time begin, and how did it evolve into a beloved reflection of contemporary Latinx family life?

One Day at a Time first aired back in 1975, centering on a white family—a single mom and two kids, just like the current version—who lived in Indianapolis, rather than LA. It was based on the experience of Whitney Blake, one of the show’s creators, as a single mom (which, at the time, was pretty revolutionary—single parenthood was not nearly as common as it is today!). The original show explored the family’s life in the midst of divorce, something that was still pretty taboo in that era, and although it was a sitcom steeped in laughs and levity, it also highlighted the difficulties of navigating the world as a single mother.

Fast forward to 2017. One Day at a Time reemerges on Netflix, and while the same basic storyline is still there, the aura of the show is totally different (and a lot more complex). Instead of focusing on a white family, the new One Day at a Time follows the story of Penelope Alvarez, a US Army Nurse Corps veteran who struggles with her return to civilian life. Alvarez separates from her husband, who had also served in the army, due to erratic behavior caused by alcoholism and PTSD—but Alvarez herself also suffers from PTSD, a conflict that adds an important dimension to the show by offering a glimpse into a mental health reality that affects large swaths of people yet is often overlooked. So, Penelope Alvarez must not simply face the challenges of single motherhood: she must also battle with the lingering trauma of combat, all while trying to manage the stresses of quotidian life in a Cuban-American family.

One Day at a Time has been lauded for its authentic portrayal of relevant social questions that are of particular importance to the Latinx community—from immigration to LGBTQ issues, One Day at a Time gracefully addresses a wide spectrum of topical concerns.

Credit: Netflix

It’s true: One Day at a Time features characters facing the intense process of applying for citizenship. It shares the story of a character who doesn’t want to celebrate her quinceañera, who ruminates about the right time to tell her family she’s queer. It challenges gender expectations by introducing its audience to non-binary characters. In certain ways, it mirrors the original series in its willingness to address sensitive yet important issues that resemble the lives of people all over the US. Perhaps that’s part of why it’s been so well-received, and why Pop TV is willing to give it another chance.

Regarding the show’s resurrection on regular network TV, Brad Schwartz, President of Pop TV, said the following in a statement: “The enthusiastic response from fans since announcing our new season of One Day at a Time has been thrilling. “The series is more important than ever with its unmatched ability to tackle topical social issues through the lens of a relatable, loving family. The exceptionally talented team behind and in front of the camera make us proud to have One Day at a Time at home at Pop TV.”

The cast is totally lovable, super talented, and deeply engaging—so much of the praise for this show surrounds the fabulous actors at the helm. It’s been called “timely and tender,” “flat-out terrific,” “old fashioned and surprisingly new-fashioned,” and if you haven’t yet tuned in to this critically acclaimed series, make sure you catch up on Seasons 1-3 before the new season premieres in March!

A 9-Year-Old Was Tragically Shot Four Times While Making TikTok Videos With His Siblings

Things That Matter

A 9-Year-Old Was Tragically Shot Four Times While Making TikTok Videos With His Siblings

Javonni Carson / GoFundMe

Javonni Carson, a 9-year-old boy from Atlanta, was making TikTok videos with his siblings when he was shot four times. The incident occurred last week, during a drive-by shooting that injured several other people.

Carson was shot four times in a drive-by shooting while he was making TikTok videos with his siblings.

Carson’s mother Keyona told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that her son was supposed to enter into the fourth grade this year and that he had been filming videos for TikTok with his siblings when the incident occurred.

Medical providers attempted to save his life during surgery for injuries that happened to his leg. According to Keyona, he is expected to recover. “My other two kids were there, too, and they saw everything,” Keyona explained. “Someone just drove by and started shooting… My 11-year-old said he was trying to crawl over to [Javonni], but there were already so many people on the ground.”

Keyona went on to explain that Javonni’s father rushed her son to the hospital and that she “didn’t know anything until I got to the hospital. I just knew he’d been shot.”

Two adults, who remain alive, were involved in the incident and were also shot according to an incident report.

According to the incident report, the shots were fired into a crowd in a parking lot, causing people to run and hide behind cars.

The shooter who was driving in the car has not yet been identified. Family members have set up a GoFundMe page to pay for Javonni’s recovery. According to the page which has  raised $8,749 out of its $20,000 goal, Javonni is an ” honor roll student at Deerwood  Academy also a striving football player and rapper he is loved by many because [of] his character and personality.”

“Thank for all the support for my family from families that don’t even know us and I send my own personal condolences to the other families that also felt this pain that no family should have to face,” the GoFundMe concludes. “Pray and Love on your families because they can be taken away at any moment.”

Transcripts Of George Floyd’s Death Find He Told Cops He Couldn’t Breathe More Than 20 Times: “Tell my kids I love them”

Things That Matter

Transcripts Of George Floyd’s Death Find He Told Cops He Couldn’t Breathe More Than 20 Times: “Tell my kids I love them”

Stephen Maturen / Getty

Over a month has passed since the death of George Floyd and while the aftermath of it seemed to spark a reaction that rattled those of us left behind to our cores, outrage over his death has slowed down. Likely you’re hearing less calls to end police brutality, seeing fewer signs that Black Lives Matter and most of your friends’ Instagram pages have likely returned to their usual blissfully ignorant states. Still, the fight for justice for George Floyd carries on and newly released transcripts of body camera footage show that Floyd had pled for his life and told officers at least 27 times that he couldn’t breathe before his death.

New transcripts from body camera footage of Floyd’s death have been filed in court.

Floyd (a truck driver, security guard, and father of five) told Minneapolis police officers over 27 times that he couldn’t breathe before he died. “I’m scared as fuck, man,” Floyd told the officers while they restrained them. “Tell my kids I love them. I’m dead.”

Transcripts of body camera footage show that Floyd told officers at least 27 times that he couldn’t breathe before passing out and dying.

“I can’t breathe for nothing, man,” Floyd told officers. “This is cold-blooded, man.” Ignoring Floyd’s cry for help, officer Derek Chauvin continued to pin Floyd down with his knee on his neck.

In the transcript, Chauvin can be heard saying to Floyd “Then stop talking. Stop yelling. It takes a heck of a lot of oxygen to talk.”

“I can’t breathe. I can’t breathe,” Floyd continued. “I’ll probably just die this way.”

The transcripts were filed by former Minneapolis police officer Thomas Lane in a move to have charges against him dropped.

Lane is one of four former police officers to be charged in Floyd’s death. Chauvin, Alexander Kueng, and Tou Thao are also being charged. Lane, Kueng, and Thao have been charged with aiding and abetting Chauvin in Floyd’s death. Meanwhile, Chauvin faces second-degree murder charges.

According to BuzzFeed, “In the motion looking to have charges against Lane dropped, attorneys argue he was a new officer on the force and following the cues from Chauvin.” At the time of Floyd’s death, Chauvin was not Lane’s field training officer. He had however been one in Lane’s precinct and had provided the Chauvin with instructions on how to deal with calls. Attorneys have pointed out that in the transcripts Lane called paramedics to the scene and asked if they should roll Floyd on his side while he was holding onto his legs.

In the transcript, Chauvin says “No, he’s staying put where we got him.”

According to transcripts, after Chauvin passed out bystanders pointed out Floyd was unresponsive. Still, Chauvin pinned him to the ground.