Entertainment

Colin Kaepernick’s Life to Become Netflix Series From Ava DuVernay

Colin Kaepernick’s life is officially getting the Hollywood treatment.

The Black NFL quarterback has announced that he has joined forces with film director Ava DuVernay for a Netflix series titled Colin in Black & White. According to The Hollywood Reporter, the scripted limited drama has been picked to go straight to series.

DuVernay’s six-episode series will take an intimate look at Kaepernick’s childhood, life in high school years, and all of the experiences that led him to become an activist today.

Kaepernick will appear in the series as himself and is set to narrate. An actor will play the younger version of Kaepernick. According to THR, “Emmy nominee Michael Starrbury will pen the script and serve as exec producer alongside DuVernay and Kaepernick. Starrbury previously teamed with DuVernay on Netflix’s Peabody-winning limited series When They See Us, based on the Central Park 5.”

Speaking about her decision to produce a film about the NFL player, DuVernay said that “With his act of protest, Colin Kaepernick ignited a national conversation about race and justice with far-reaching consequences for football, culture, and for him, personally. Colin’s story has much to say about identity, sports, and the enduring spirit of protest and resilience. I couldn’t be happier than to tell this story with the team at Netflix.” 

Netflix says that the drama was conceived back in 2019 and scripts were completed this past May.

The series will look at Kaepernick’s early life as a Black child growing up in a white household that adopted him all while training to become a competitive quarterback while determining his own identity.

“Too often we see race and Black stories portrayed through a white lens,” Kaepernick told THR. “We seek to give new perspective to the differing realities that Black people face. We explore the racial conflicts I faced as an adopted Black man in a white community, during my high school years. It’s an honor to bring these stories to life in collaboration with Ava for the world to see.”

“We’re proud to bring Colin’s experience and his creative vision to life as he joins Ava to share his powerful story and message with all our members around the world,” Cindy Holland, VP originals at Netflix, told THRr. “It is an unparalleled union of two strong and defining voices coming together to tell the story about what it’s like to be Black in America.”

Kaepernick’s influence on the current BLM movement is expanding.

In 2016, the football player set out to protest racial injustice, police brutality, and systematic oppression ahead of a San Francisco 49ers game by kneeling during the national anthem. His act of protest ultimately roused polarizing conversations amongst athletes, NFL officials, and fans. At the time President Trump demanded NFL team owners fire Kaepernick along with any other players who protested during the national anthem. Eventually, Kaepernick became a free agent in 2017 and filed a lawsuit against the NFL. He claimed that the organization and its owners had colluded to keep him out of the league.

In February, he signed a deal with Audible to create multiple projects, including for his upcoming memoir.

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All Of The October- Released Movies And Shows You Won’t Have To Rent But Can Stream If You Have Netflix, Amazon, and Disney+

Entertainment

All Of The October- Released Movies And Shows You Won’t Have To Rent But Can Stream If You Have Netflix, Amazon, and Disney+

Netflix

With October comes (yes, Pumpkin Spice Lattes) chilly weather, tons of spookiness, and a whole heck of a lot of Halloween media content! Part of the month also includes celebrations of Hispanic Heritage Month, a time for Latinos to pat themselves on the back for their contributions to the culture and history of the United States. Fortunately, today’s Big Streamers are including new movies and TV shows that celebrate both Halloween and Latinidad with new seasons of “Carmen Sandiego” and “Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror (Shudder).”

We scoured the streaming sites for all of their upcoming October shows and movies and listed all of the ones you might enjoy this season from the 2011 film Colombiana starring Zoe Saldana to the Mexican-American favorite “Beverly Hills Chihuahua.”

Check out the full list of movies and TV shows coming to your favorite streamers this month below!

Oct. 1

Netflix

A.M.I.

Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls

Along Came a Spider

Bakugan: Armored Alliance: Season 2

Bom Dia, Verônica / Good Morning, Verônica

Basic Instinct

Black ’47

Cape Fear

Carmen Sandiego: Season 3

Fargo

Food Wars!: Shokugeki no Soma: The Second Plate

Free State of Jones

Ghost Rider

Ghosts of Girlfriends Past

Gran Torino

I’m Leaving Now

The Longest Yard (1974)

The Parkers: Seasons 1-5

Pasal Kau / All Because of You

The Pirates! Band of Misfits

Carlos Almaraz: Playing with Fire

The Prince & Me

Poseidon (2006)

The Outpost

Yogi Bear

You Cannot Hide: Season 1

Amazon

30 Days Of Night (2007)

A Knight’s Tale (2001)

Battlefield Earth (2000)

Blood Ties (2014)

Drugstore Cowboy (1989)

Kindred Spirits (2020)

La Sucursal (2019)

Madea’s Big Happy Family (2011)

Mud (2013)

National Security (2003)

Next Level (2019)

Noose For A Gunman (1960)

Nurse (2014)

Quantum Of Solace (2008)

Raging Bull (1980)

Señorita Justice (2004)

1992: Berlusconi Rising: Season 1 (Topic)

40 & Single: Season 1 (Urban Movie Channel)

America’s Great Divide: From Obama to Trump: Season 1 (PBS Documentaries)

Cisco Kid: Season (Best Westerns Ever)

Cities of the Underworld: Season 1 (HISTORY Vault)

Cold Case Files Classic: Season 1 (A&E Crime Central)

Get Shorty: Seasons 1-3

Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror (Shudder)

Liar: Season 1 (Sundance Now)

Mrs. Wilson: Season 1 (PBS Masterpiece)

Mystery Road: Season 1 (Acorn TV)

PNS Kids: Spooky Stories!: Season 1 (PBS Kids)

Tales of Tomorrow: Season 1 (Best TV Ever)

The Great British Baking Show: Season 1 (PBS Living)

The Loudest Voice: Season 1 (Showtime)

Thou Shalt Not Kill: Season 1 (PBS Masterpiece)

Disney

Maleficent

Oct. 2

Netflix

A Go! Go! Cory Carson Halloween

Ahí te encargo / You’ve Got This

The Binding

Dick Johnson Is Dead

Emily in Paris

Òlòtūré

Serious Men

Song Exploder

Vampires vs. the Bronx

Amazon

Bug Diaries Halloween Special – Amazon Original Special

Savage X Fenty Show. Vol. 2 – Amazon Original Special

Disney

Beverly Hills Chihuahua

Cheaper by the Dozen 2

Mr. Holland’s Opus

Secrets of the Zoo: Down Under (s1)

The Simpsons (s31)

Zenimation Extended Edition Premiere

Magic of Disney’s Animal Kingdom Episode 102 – “Happy Birthday, Gino!”

One Day at Disney Episode 144 – “Pablo Tufino: Ride Show Technician”

Weird But True Episode 308 – “Our Solar System”

Oct. 4

Netflix

Colombiana

David Attenborough: A Life on Our Planet

Oct. 6

Netflix

Dolly Parton: Here I Am

Saturday Church

StarBeam: Halloween Hero

Walk Away from Love

Oct. 7

Netflix

Hubie Halloween

Schitt’s Creek: Season 6

To the Lake

Oct. 9

Netflix

Deaf U

Fast & Furious Spy Racers: Season 2: Rio

The Forty-Year-Old Version

Ginny Weds Sunny

The Haunting of Bly Manor

Super Monsters: Dia de los Monsters

Oct. 12

Netflix

Kipo and the Age of Wonderbeasts: Season 3

Oct. 13

Netflix

The Cabin with Bert Kreischer

Octonauts & the Great Barrier Reef

Oct. 14

Netflix

Alice Junior

BLACKPINK: Light Up the Sky

Moneyball

Oct. 15

Netflix

A Babysitter’s Guide to Monster Hunting

Batman: The Killing Joke

Half & Half: Seasons 1-4

Love Like the Falling Rain

One on One: Seasons 1-5

Power Rangers Beast Morphers: Season 2, Part 1

Rooting for Roona

Social Distance

Amazon

Halal Love Story (2020)

Playing With Fire (2019)

Oct. 16

Netflix

Alguien tiene que morir / Someone Has to Die

Dream Home Makeover

Grand Army

In a Valley of Violence

La Révolution

The Last Kids on Earth: Book 3

The Trial of the Chicago 7

Unfriended

Oct. 18

Netflix

ParaNorman

Oct. 19

Netflix

Unsolved Mysteries: Volume 2

Oct. 20

Netflix

Carol

The Magic School Bus Rides Again The Frizz Connection

Oct. 21

Netflix

My Next Guest Needs No Introduction With David Letterman: Season 3

Rebecca

Oct. 22

Netflix

Bending the Arc

Cadaver

The Hummingbird Project

Yes, God, Yes

Oct. 23

Netflix

Barbarians

Move

Over the Moon

Perdida

The Queen’s Gambit

Amazon

Mirzapur – Amazon Original Series: Season 2

Oct. 27

Netflix

Blood of Zeus

Chico Bon Bon: Monkey with a Tool Belt: Season 4

Sarah Cooper: Everything’s Fine

Vilas: Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada / Guillermo Vilas: Settling the Score

Oct. 28

Netflix

Holidate

Metallica Through The Never

Nobody Sleeps in the Woods Tonight

Secrets of the Saqqara Tomb

Oct. 29

Amazon

Movies

Soorarai Pottru (2020)

Oct. 30

Netflix

Bronx 

The Day of the Lord

His House

Somebody Feed Phil: Season 4

Suburra: Season 3

Amazon

Truth Seekers – Amazon Original Series: Season 1

Disney

Disney the Owl House (s1)

The Sorcerer’s Apprentice

X-Ray Earth (s1)

The Mandalorian Season Premiere “Chapter 9”

Magic of Disney’s Animal Kingdom Episode 106 – “Peri’s Prickly Pregnancy”

The Right Stuff Episode 105 – “The Kona Kai Seance”

Weird But True Episode 312 – “Camping”

One Day At Disney Episode 148 – “Dana Amendola: Disney Theatrical Productions”

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Oct. 31

Netflix

The 12th Man

Amazon

I’ll See You In My Dreams (2015)

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Twitter’s AIs Prefer Ted Cruz With Boobs And White Skin Over Black

Things That Matter

Twitter’s AIs Prefer Ted Cruz With Boobs And White Skin Over Black

Ever notice how on some social platforms like Twitter or Instagram that you yourself are mysteriously unable to crop your display images on your own? That’s because Twitter prefers to let their algorithms make the decision. Over the weekend users on Twitter discovered the surprising dangers of letting algorithms crop your own images.

Education tech researcher Colin Madland drew attention to the issue while speaking out about how the video-calling program Zoom, often crops the head out of his black person coworker while on calls.

It didn’t take long for Madland and other users to discover that Twitter’s AIs use discriminatory equations to prioritize certain faces as well. In short, the social platform’s AIs prefer white faces over Black ones.

In response to the discoveries, a Twitter spokesperson acknowledged that the company was looking into the issue “Our team did test for bias before shipping the model and did not find evidence of racial or gender bias in our testing. But it’s clear from these examples that we’ve got more analysis to do. We’re looking into this and will continue to share what we learn and what actions we take,” they stated.

Of course, Madland’s discovery is nothing new. In 2019, test results from the National Institute of Standards and Technology revealed that some of the strongest algorithms online were much more likely to confuse the faces of Black women than those of white women, or Black or white men. “The NIST test challenged algorithms to verify that two photos showed the same face, similar to how a border agent would check passports,” Wired points out. “At sensitivity settings where Idemia’s algorithms falsely matched different white women’s faces at a rate of one in 10,000, it falsely matched black women’s faces about once in 1,000—10 times more frequently. A one in 10,000 false match rate is often used to evaluate facial recognition systems.”

Still, it didn’t take long for users on the platform to ask what other physical preferences Twitter has.

Turns out the AIs prefer Ted Cruz with large anime breasts over a normal-looking Ted Cruz.

(To better understand this Tweet, click the link above)

The user who tested the image of Cruz, found that Twitter’s algorithm on the back end selected what part of the picture it would showcase in the preview and ultimately chose both images of Cruz with a large anime chest.

It’s nothing new that Twitter has its massive problems.

For a platform that so controls and oversees so much of what we consume and how we now operate, it’s scary to know how Twitter chooses to display people with different skin tones. The round of jokes and Twitter experiments by users has only revived concerns on how “learning” computer algorithms fuel real-world biases like racism and sexism.

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