Entertainment

Bad Bunny’s ‘En Casita’ Is The Self-Isolation Anthem You Didn’t Realize You Needed

Bad Bunny is one musician we all know and love. He uses his platform to speak on issues around the world. Now, Bad Bunny is using his music, and relationship, to give people a song to remind them to stay home and stay safe. We are all in this together no matter how far apart we are.

Bad Bunny and his girlfriend Gabriela are here to help you through your self-isolation.

“En Casita” is literally here to remind you to keep yourself at home. We all might be feeling a little stir crazy and ready to get back out into the world but it is so important to work together to defeat this virus’s spread. Every country is trying to flatten the curve to keep the number of hospitalizations to a minimum and that might be uncomfortable.

People are loving the collab between Bad Bunny and Gabriela.

Not just musically. People on Twitter are loving the real-life collab between the two. Sure, the music is great but seeing the kind of love out little Bad Bunny can have is something we have all been waiting for.

Bad Bunny wants everyone to know that this song was improvised and not planned.

Some people are apparently trying to call bad Bunny out on the song because of its simplicity. However, not everything had to be so complicated if you are trying to make a banger. “En Casita” is the perfect song to let play while you go about your day within your space.

Listen to the full song below and get yourself in the right state of mind.

Stay safe. Stay home. Wash your hands. Practice social distancing. Let’s work together to move forward together.

READ: From Latin Trap ‘Rude Boy’ To Harvard Speaker: Bad Bunny Was Invited To Give A Talk To Harvard Students

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Latin Music Revenue in the U.S. Grew in 2020, Up 20 Percent in Streaming

Entertainment

Latin Music Revenue in the U.S. Grew in 2020, Up 20 Percent in Streaming

STILLZ

Despite the COVID-19 pandemic that grips the globe, Latin music in the U.S. saw a 20 percent rise in streaming revenue in 2020. The genre posted a fifth consecutive year of overall revenue growth last year, according to the RIAA on Wednesday.

Latin music posted its best revenue in the U.S. since 2005.

The RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) released the 2020 year-end report on Latin music.

“Latin music continues to ‘punch above its weight’ – posting its fifth straight year of growth amidst the challenges and disruptions of the COVID economy,” wrote RIAA COO Michele Ballantyne in an annual revenue report.

After accounting for 5 percent of overall music revenue in the U.S. in 2019, that percentage rose to 5.4 percent last year. Latin music is heavily consumed on streaming and video platforms. Revenue for the genre is at its highest since 2005, the era when reggaeton music first broke through thanks to Puerto Rican acts like Daddy Yankee, Ivy Queen, and Tego Caulderón.

Bad Bunny had the highest-certified Latin music single of 2020.

Over a decade later, and it’s still reggaeton and Boricua artists that are leading the pack of Latin music stars. According to the RIAA, Bad Bunny’s “Yo Perreo Sola” was the highest-certified Latin music single of 2020. The hit song from his Grammy and Latin Grammy-winning YHLQMDLG album was certified 24-times Diamante. The RIAA is responsible for certifying albums and singles as platinum and gold. Latin music accounted for 15 percent of the certifications in 2020.

The news about Bad Bunny shouldn’t be a surprise as Spotify revealed last year that he was the most-streamed artist globally on the platform. He was followed by Canadian superstar Drake and Colombian reggaeton singer J Balvin.

The RIAA credits Latin music’s 20 percent streaming growth in 2020 to the fans who are turning to paid streaming subscriptions. YouTube is another major platform where Latin music is consumed. Billboard reported that 30 percent of the top 100 music videos of 2020 were from Latin music artists.  

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Read: Bad Bunny and Kali Uchis Win Their First Grammy Awards, Jhay Cortez Performs “Dákiti” with Benito

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In Cuba, Where Food Is Unreliable, Savvy Cooks Have Turned to Facebook to Share Recipes

Culture

In Cuba, Where Food Is Unreliable, Savvy Cooks Have Turned to Facebook to Share Recipes

Photo via Getty Images

COVID-19 hasn’t been easy for Cubans. Not only have Cubans been physically affected by the virus like the rest of the world, but the drop in the island’s gross domestic product has stymied local economic productivity. The island can no longer look to tourism to add to their GDP.

Because of this drop in GDP, food shortages on the island have become more severe than in recent memory. And Cuban cooks are feeling the effects.

Cubans must stand in line for hours at markets with no guarantees that the ingredients that they want will be available.

This way of living is especially hard for Cuban cooks, like 39-year-old Yuliet Colón. For Colón, cooking is both a creative expression and a stress reliever. “The kitchen is my happy place, where I am calmer and I feel better,” she recently revealed to the Associated Press.

Yuliet Colón is one of the creators of a Facebook page called Recetas del Corazón that has changed the cooking game for thousands of Cubans.

Now, thanks to Colón and other curious and generous Cuban cooks like her, Recipes from the Heart is now 12,000 members strong.

The goal of the page is to help struggling Cuban cooks cope with food shortages. Members of the page share creative recipes, tips, and food substitutions. Launched in June of 2020, the page was an instant success. Its success proves that Cubans have been desperate to find ways to adapt their cooking to the post-COVID-era.

To AP News, Yuliet Colón laments about the lack of rice, beans, cheese, fruit, and, most of all, eggs. “What I like the most is making desserts, but now it’s hard to get eggs, milk or flour,” she revealed.

The brightside is, however, that Cuban cooks are finally able to share food-related tips and tricks with each other on a much larger scale than they were before the internet became more widespread in the country.

Now that many Cubans have access to communication apps like Facebook and WhatsApp, they can now connect with one another and make the most of what they have–however little that may be.

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