Entertainment

From Latin Trap ‘Rude Boy’ To Harvard Speaker: Bad Bunny Was Invited To Give A Talk To Harvard Students

This year has seen Bad Bunny jetsetting from country to country on his long-awaited European tour. Last week, however, the king of Latin trap made a special visit that wasn’t included in his tour itinerary. Bad Bunny was invited to Harvard University to share his insights and career advice with a few lucky students, aspiring musicians and creatives.

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Bad Bunny attended Harvard University last week —but not as a student or to film a new music video, the rapper was invited to give a talk on music and activism.

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The Puerto Rican artist offered a talk at Harvard University last week, in which he discussed the way he wants to open up space for activism and protest within his music and his presentations. Benito Martinez —the rapper’s real name— also talked extensively on inclusion, which has been a strong element in music videos. He touched upon his gender-flexible art, which has positioned him as somewhat of a queer icon, and his wish to create socially inclusive spaces. 

The talk was hosted by ‘No Label’ a platform that has become an essential key in the music industry to provide space that allows artists to be themselves.

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The talk that El Conejo Malo imparted last Friday at Harvard, was part of a monthly series called Uncut by No Label —an agency that curates “nontraditional spaces for artists to share ideas they actually care about.” The creative agency ‘No Label’ has fostered spaces for artists like Travis Scott, JID, Cousin Stizz —and most recently Bad Bunny— to develop themes from creativity, to criminal justice reforms.

The talk was directed by a Harvard scholar who studies Reggaeton and the impact it has on the island of Puerto Rico.

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Last Friday’s talk was directed by Professor Petra Rivera-Rideau, a scholar who studies race and ethnic identities and popular culture in Latin America and U.S. Latina/o communities. Rivera-Rideau is the author of the book “Remixing Reggaeton: The Cultural Politics of Race in Puerto Rico”, which studies the political history of reggaeton on the Caribbean island.

This was Bad Bunny’s second visit to an academic institute during the month of October.

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Benito’s been doing the rounds in the academic sphere as of late. He first visited an academic institute on the 10th of October, when he appeared by surprise in the city of Hialleah, in Miami-Dade County, to announce a scholarship program aimed at low-income Hispanic students, whom he recommended not to abandon studies .

The famous reggaetonero called on the 300 students gathered in the auditorium of the institute “to continue studying and give the best of oneself to succeed in life.”

Benito is known for taking a stand and taking to the streets to demand change.

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Earlier this summer, while on a break in Ibiza, the Latin trap star tweeted that he was putting the tour on hold to join protestors in Puerto Rico. Using the hashtag #RickyRenuncia, Bad Bunny and thousands of other Puerto Ricans called for the resignation of Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rosselló, who was embroiled in a corruption scandal.

The urban music icon took to Instagram to share his political views and to rally his fellow Puerto Rican followers to join the protests.

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“For years, decades, the system has taught us to stay quiet,” said Bad Bunny in one of two Instagram videos posted in July and since deleted. “They’ve made us believe that those who take to the streets to speak up are crazy, criminals, troublemakers. Let’s show them that today’s generations demand respect […] The country doesn’t belong to them, it belongs to all of us.”

Residente, Ricky Martin and Olga Tañon joined Bad Bunny in protests against Roselló.

credit instagram @ricky_martin

Bad Bunny was just one of the celebrities (along with Ricky Martin and others) who was on the ground in Puerto Rico calling for the governor’s resignation—which he eventually (and reluctantly) gave. “Yesterday marked me forever,” he wrote in Spanish on Instagram. “I had never felt so much pride in my life! However, the fight continues PUERTO RICO!”

That was not the first time Bad Bunny confronted the island’s head of state.

credit instagram @ricky_martin

In January, Bad Bunny and fellow Puerto Rican rapper Residente, showed up unannounced to the governor’s mansion in the wee hours of the morning, to address the island’s high crime rate. Back then, they only had diplomatic words for Rosselló; but in their brand new track “Afilando Los Cuchillos”, or “Sharpening The Knives,” Bad Bunny shares his most politically incisive commentary yet. “Let all the continents know that Ricardo Rosselló is an incompetent, homophobic liar,” spits Bunny in Spanish: “A delinquent, no one wants you…not even your own people.”

Bad Bunny is an example of what a well-rounded artist can accomplish and how empowering his work can be. Whether he’s selling out arenas, taking the time to protest for causes he believes in, or speaking to students about the industry, we can’t wait to find out what the ‘callaita’ singer has in store for us next. 

‘Made In Medellín’ Is J Balvin’s Latest Project: A Podcast About His Life Struggles, His Relationships, And His Mental Health Struggles

Entertainment

‘Made In Medellín’ Is J Balvin’s Latest Project: A Podcast About His Life Struggles, His Relationships, And His Mental Health Struggles

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In the past J Balvin has been open about dealing with depression and anxiety.  He’s published many Instagram posts and stories about it, and he’s even written letters to his fans about it. Now, el chico de Medellin, is opening up even further. J Balvin released an 8-episode podcast all about his life, his career, his relationships and all the obstacles he’s faced, including his mental health.

The singer just released a new podcast series called “Made in Medellin” on Spotify.

In “Made in Medellin,” Balvin shares intimate details about his life, career, relationships and all the obstacles he faced while reaching for his dreams of becoming a global artist. “I know a lot about J Balvin and little about José,” he says at the start of the podcast, hinting that he’s going to take listeners on a journey to get to know the real him.

The eight-episode podcast will take fans into his personal struggle with mental health.

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Mami aquí llego tu vaquero 🤠

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Each episode focuses on a different topic and time in his life. “I dedicated myself a lot to the character,” he continues in his opening lines. “But without José, there is no J Balvin. In the end, that character is me, I can’t separate from him.” 

Fans will also get to delve deeper into the top Reggaeton artist’s personal life.

We will be let listeners in on details about his life and career through conversations with the people closest to him. His parents Alba Balvin and Álvaro Osorio are included in episodes as well as his past girlfriend of 10 years.

The Colombian singer himself narrates the never-before-told stories.

From dreaming big in Medellin, to his struggles with anxiety and depression while on tour, to the time he actually proposed marriage. Balvin is also accompanied by some of his closest friends; Andrés López “Papa” and Carlos Torres, as well as “La Mona” Osorio, who was his girlfriend for 10 years.

The podcast isn’t only about Balvin’s life and work.

Aptly titled “Made in Medellin,” the podcast is built upon the backdrop of the Colombian city of Medellín itself, with its vibrant adoption of reggaeton as the basis for his own rise to success in the first place. Balvin pays homage to some of the genre’s legends, including Daddy Yankee, Don Omar, and Wisin and Yandel. Otherwise, the episodes’ theatrics are sparse, yet thoughtfully produced — you’ll often hear a signature dembow beat thumping through, or the gentle hum of city chatter making its way to the surface.

With global hits such as “Mi Gente,” “Ay Vamos,” and “Ginza,” Balvin has taken the reggaeton movement to some of the biggest stages.

Balvin has taken his Latin flow to the biggest spheres of music, including the Tomorrowland electronic music festival in Belgium and as a headlining act at Coachella in California.

José Álvaro Osorio Balvín is a crossover king who understands the power of innovation and partnership. 

With musical roots steeped in rap, R&B, bachata, reggae, and champeta, the Colombian-born has crossed over into the world with his Latin sound and charmed listeners from every nation. How? Collaborating, innovating and creating something fresh. Do you want proof? Here it is: his growing list of chart-topping collabs with today’s hottest pop and hip-hop artists include Justin Bieber, Maroon 5, Ariana Grande, Beyonce, Pharrell Williams (he has also toured with Enrique Iglesias and Pitbull).

In 2018, Balvin snagged Spotify’s top spot with the Most Monthly Listeners Globally.

Balvin surpassed Drake’s long-held record, with over 48.1 million monthly listeners. He officially became the most popular artist on the platform that year.

“Dreams are the reason for everything I do. The reason why I get up. And the beauty of dreams is that they are infinite,” he says in the recording.

J Balvin, one of the top recording artists in the world, is readying his new album to be released in the Spring. He is also the first reggaeton artist to perform on the main stage at Coachella, leading EDM festival Tomorrowland, and the first-ever Latin artist to headline at Lollapalooza.

Fans can listen to all episodes of the “Made in Medellin” podcast here.

READ: Maluma Spills The Tea On His Relationship With J Balvin, Starring In A Movie With J Lo And What His Future Holds

Demi Lovato’s Heartbreaking Song And Alicia Keys’ Tribute To Kobe Bryant Will Bring You To Tears

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Demi Lovato’s Heartbreaking Song And Alicia Keys’ Tribute To Kobe Bryant Will Bring You To Tears

Last night was “Music’s Biggest Night!” —aka. the Grammys. All the pop stars came out to perform and take home awards for the music we’ve been listening on repeat over the last year. And while this night isn’t quite as elegant and frothy as the Oscars, Grammy attendees still serve fancy, theatrical and tbh, kind of whacky fashion. The award ceremony allows for an “Anything Goes” policy when it comes to dressing up —so we rounded up the most exciting, and most yawn-inducing fashion moments of the night.  

Best: Billy Porter’s shady fringe

Porter, who hands down won the award for just the most, served us a whole moment on the red carpet when the rhinestones that hung from his hat started to open up, revealing the actor’s face.“Get on my nerves, and the curtain closes!” Billy Porter explained of the motorized fringe curtain lining his glitter-encrusted wide-brimmed hat. Turns out the look was a moment of appreciation for the other Billie [Eilish]. He once told his stylist Sammy Ratelle that he loved Eilish’s face nets. So here it is; face nets, but make it Billy Porter. 

Best: Demi Lovato

Among the many performances at the Grammys last night, perhaps one of the most anticipated was that of Demi Lovato. After a year and a half since her overdose, Demi returned to the stage singing a new song that brought the audience to tears—and to their feet for a standing ovation. The singer stood onstage in a white gown that featured a studded corset belt and puffy floor-length skirt. The look was simple, angelic and simply perfect. The Christian Siriano gown was a perfect way to highlight Demi’s return to the stage. 

Best: Alicia Keys’ shimmering armor

Alicia Keys started the night by paying respect to the late NBA star, Kobe Bryant, who sadly passed away yesterday during a helicopter crash. “To be honest with you, we’re all feeling crazy sadness right now,” said the host for the night. “We’re literally standing here heartbroken in the house that Kobe Bryant built.” Boyz II Men joined Keys on stage to sing “It’s So Hard To Say Goodbye to Yesterday”. Standing in the middle of the trio, Keys looked statuesque in a shimmering Atelier Versace gown that accentuated her figure. 

Best: Lizzo’s Old Hollywood style

Lizzo’s look for the Grammys last night was glam and fabulous like the performer herself. The  Old Hollywood silhouette of her Atelier Versace gown was brought back straight to modern day with glittery embellishments, extra AF nails and an actual fur stole. No tiny handbag on sight this time but I mean… the Jessica Rabbit realness was next level. 

Best: Cardi B serving #bodyconfidence

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Cardi had us all fooled thinking she wouldn’t be attending the award show after she was nowhere to be seen during the red carpet. But thankfully, our Latina queen showed up and showed out in a dreamy see-through Mugler look. The nude, sheer gown with floor-length sleeves had crystal detailing covering the singer’s entire body in glimmering stripes. Cardi was not up for any Grammy nominations this year but took home the award for Best Rap Album at last year’s ceremony

Worst: Camila Cabello

Camila walked the red carpet, sans boyfriend Shawn Mendes, in a strapless black gown. Decked out in Versace she looked beautiful but we missed her bf.

Worst of the Worst: Joy Villa

“If I’m not known for my music, I might as well be known for my ridiculous fashion choices” —Joy Villa, probably, every time she decides what to wear to a red carpet. The Pro-Trump singer has taken it upon herself to flaunt her pro-conservative politics at the annual music event —we’ll say it again for the people in the back: Annual. Music. Event. The red, white and blue ensemble however, showed off Villa’s belief that Donald Trump should be voted back into office featuring the words “Impeached & Re-elected.” After using the Grammys as a political stunt for the past six years, we’re left wondering if she’ll ever make music as memorable as her statement dressing. 

Worst: Gwen Stefani’s weird performance and dress

So during Gwen Stefani and Blake Shelton’s performance of “Nobody But You,” both singers were off-key and awkward —but that’tsnot even all of it. Stefani inexplicably wore a Dolce & Gabbana dress that felt vaguely culturally appropriative with its iconography and headdress (this wouldn’t be the first time for her). Idk about you, but I think, maybe they should just stick to flirting on The Voice and releasing holiday singles.