Entertainment

From Latin Trap ‘Rude Boy’ To Harvard Speaker: Bad Bunny Was Invited To Give A Talk To Harvard Students

This year has seen Bad Bunny jetsetting from country to country on his long-awaited European tour. Last week, however, the king of Latin trap made a special visit that wasn’t included in his tour itinerary. Bad Bunny was invited to Harvard University to share his insights and career advice with a few lucky students, aspiring musicians and creatives.

credit Instagram @badbunnypr

Bad Bunny attended Harvard University last week —but not as a student or to film a new music video, the rapper was invited to give a talk on music and activism.

credit Instagram @badbunnypr

The Puerto Rican artist offered a talk at Harvard University last week, in which he discussed the way he wants to open up space for activism and protest within his music and his presentations. Benito Martinez —the rapper’s real name— also talked extensively on inclusion, which has been a strong element in music videos. He touched upon his gender-flexible art, which has positioned him as somewhat of a queer icon, and his wish to create socially inclusive spaces. 

The talk was hosted by ‘No Label’ a platform that has become an essential key in the music industry to provide space that allows artists to be themselves.

credit Instagram @badbunnypr

The talk that El Conejo Malo imparted last Friday at Harvard, was part of a monthly series called Uncut by No Label —an agency that curates “nontraditional spaces for artists to share ideas they actually care about.” The creative agency ‘No Label’ has fostered spaces for artists like Travis Scott, JID, Cousin Stizz —and most recently Bad Bunny— to develop themes from creativity, to criminal justice reforms.

The talk was directed by a Harvard scholar who studies Reggaeton and the impact it has on the island of Puerto Rico.

credit Twitter @ZalUIbaorimi

Last Friday’s talk was directed by Professor Petra Rivera-Rideau, a scholar who studies race and ethnic identities and popular culture in Latin America and U.S. Latina/o communities. Rivera-Rideau is the author of the book “Remixing Reggaeton: The Cultural Politics of Race in Puerto Rico”, which studies the political history of reggaeton on the Caribbean island.

This was Bad Bunny’s second visit to an academic institute during the month of October.

credit Twitter @mcdonaldscorp

Benito’s been doing the rounds in the academic sphere as of late. He first visited an academic institute on the 10th of October, when he appeared by surprise in the city of Hialleah, in Miami-Dade County, to announce a scholarship program aimed at low-income Hispanic students, whom he recommended not to abandon studies .

The famous reggaetonero called on the 300 students gathered in the auditorium of the institute “to continue studying and give the best of oneself to succeed in life.”

Benito is known for taking a stand and taking to the streets to demand change.

credit Twitter @blockholy

Earlier this summer, while on a break in Ibiza, the Latin trap star tweeted that he was putting the tour on hold to join protestors in Puerto Rico. Using the hashtag #RickyRenuncia, Bad Bunny and thousands of other Puerto Ricans called for the resignation of Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rosselló, who was embroiled in a corruption scandal.

The urban music icon took to Instagram to share his political views and to rally his fellow Puerto Rican followers to join the protests.

credit Twitter @blockholy

“For years, decades, the system has taught us to stay quiet,” said Bad Bunny in one of two Instagram videos posted in July and since deleted. “They’ve made us believe that those who take to the streets to speak up are crazy, criminals, troublemakers. Let’s show them that today’s generations demand respect […] The country doesn’t belong to them, it belongs to all of us.”

Residente, Ricky Martin and Olga Tañon joined Bad Bunny in protests against Roselló.

credit instagram @ricky_martin

Bad Bunny was just one of the celebrities (along with Ricky Martin and others) who was on the ground in Puerto Rico calling for the governor’s resignation—which he eventually (and reluctantly) gave. “Yesterday marked me forever,” he wrote in Spanish on Instagram. “I had never felt so much pride in my life! However, the fight continues PUERTO RICO!”

That was not the first time Bad Bunny confronted the island’s head of state.

credit instagram @ricky_martin

In January, Bad Bunny and fellow Puerto Rican rapper Residente, showed up unannounced to the governor’s mansion in the wee hours of the morning, to address the island’s high crime rate. Back then, they only had diplomatic words for Rosselló; but in their brand new track “Afilando Los Cuchillos”, or “Sharpening The Knives,” Bad Bunny shares his most politically incisive commentary yet. “Let all the continents know that Ricardo Rosselló is an incompetent, homophobic liar,” spits Bunny in Spanish: “A delinquent, no one wants you…not even your own people.”

Bad Bunny is an example of what a well-rounded artist can accomplish and how empowering his work can be. Whether he’s selling out arenas, taking the time to protest for causes he believes in, or speaking to students about the industry, we can’t wait to find out what the ‘callaita’ singer has in store for us next. 

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Zariah And Ugly Primo Want To Make Sure That You Get Out There And Vote For Our Community

Things That Matter

Zariah And Ugly Primo Want To Make Sure That You Get Out There And Vote For Our Community

Weiden + Kennedy / YouTube

There is a lot at stake in the upcoming elections. Organizations representing so many communities have come forward to fight for civil rights. Artists are also getting involved to make sure that their fans and and communities get out the vote and make the world the way they want to see it.

Zairah and Ugly Primo teamed up to tell their fans to get out and vote.

“Mueve El Pom Pom” is an anthem to all of the people out there who need to be mobilized to go vote. Ugly Primo and Zairah teamed up to create a visual piece of art that highlights the importance of getting out the vote in a very important election.

The animated music video makes the case for the need to get out the vote. Zairah and Ugly Primo highlight the crises facing the American public from affordable healthcare to an immigration system that needs to be reformed to the Trump administration’s continued attacks on public education.

The video is really pushing for people to get their pom poms to the polls.

Images of protest signs we have seen throughout Trump’s administration make an appearance. Black Lives Matter and pro-women signs appear in both English and Spanish to highlight the need for all communities to come together.

The visuals, done by the one and only Ugly Primo, drive home the importance of our community voting as a bloc to create the kind of society we want to live in. It is also encouraging people to go out and vote and to vote any way that they can.

The video is calling on the Latino community to come together and vote to save our democracy.

There is a lot of concern about the fate of democracy in the U.S. The Trump administration has bulldozed over political norms and made comments contrary to our democracy. The latest example of President Trump threatening American democracy is him saying he isn’t sure if he will accept the results of the election. This simple and peaceful transition of power is what democracies are built on. President Trump has not signaled that he will be willing to peacefully accept the election results.

READ: Voting Rights Activists Are Sounding The Alarm Of Latin Voter Suppression In Texas

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This 12-Year-Old MENSA Member Is Starting His Sophomore Year of College But Stays Humble— ‘I Just Grasp Information Quickly’

Fierce

This 12-Year-Old MENSA Member Is Starting His Sophomore Year of College But Stays Humble— ‘I Just Grasp Information Quickly’

CBS

Twelve-year-old Caleb Anderson has a head on his shoulder that’s steering him towards a bright and brilliant future. Most kids Anderson’s age are diving headfirst into their 7th-grade year, he on the other hand is headed to college.

Back to college that is.

Anderson is currently enrolled at Chattahoochee Technical College as a sophomore.

From Marietta, Georgia, he’s on track to graduate with his bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering in two years. Speaking to CBS News for an interview the pre-treen remains humble and chalks up his success to being quick.

“I’m not really smart,” Caleb explained in his interview with the outlet. “I just grasp information quickly. So, if I learn quicker, then I get ahead faster.”

When it comes to pursuing his education, Anderson has his eyes set on a greater prize than just earning his bachelor’s degree. The 12-year-old is intent on heading off to Georgia Institute of Technology or the Massachusetts Institute for Technology. He’s hoping to eventually wind up with an internship at Tesla working for SpaceX founder Elon Musk.

“When I was like 1, I always wanted to go to space,” Anderson said in a separate interview with USA Today. “I figured that aerospace engineering would be the best path.”

Just twelve and Anderson has made quite a few other accomplishments.

At just 9 months old he learned how to do American Sign Language began reading just a few months later. “I have this distinct memory of going to a first-grade class and learning there, and everyone was way taller than me, because, you know, I was 2,” he explained to USA Today. “I could barely walk!”

According to his interviews, Anderson began solving math equations by the time he reached his second birthday and qualified for MENSA at just 3 years old. MENSA is the largest and oldest high IQ society across the globe. The non-profit organization is open to people who score at the 98th percentile or higher on a standardized intelligence test. Members have included the likes of Geena Davis, Nolan Gould of “Modern Family,” and Joyce Carol Oates.

Explaining what it is like to raise a genius, Anderson’s father Kobi WKYC that he realized his kid was special when he began to speak to other parents.

“As we started to interact with other parents, and had other children, then we started to realize how exceptional this experience was because we had no other frame of reference,” Kobi explained. “He has far surpassed me in math, so I can’t help him anymore. Seriously! He’s in calculus two now!”

When it comes to her son, Anderson’s mother says that she hopes other parents see him as an example and that he inspires other Black children.

“I think people have a negative perspective when it comes to African-American boys,” she explained. “There are many other Calebs out there… African-American boys like him. From being a teacher — I really believe that. But they don’t have the opportunity or the resources.”

Check out Anderson’s interview below!

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