Culture

Does Black Friday Not Hit The Same Anymore Or Is It Just Us?

Sansgiving for us Latinos has a whole other meaning — we might have pavo and gravy, but we have tons of separate traditions, too. Sure, growing up Latino meant our mamis and abuelas brought in Americanized traditions like jiggly canned cranberry (an acquired taste). However, our Sansgiving menus also included very Hispanic foods like mangú, platanitos, and for dessert, tres leches and flan. Undeniably, being Latinx in this country is all about blending our roots with traditions from the big U.S.A. And yes, that includes the classic, capitalistic, love-it-or-hate-it holiday Black Friday.

Who else can remember going straight from Thanksgiving dinner to doing must-have Black Friday shopping? For many of our Latino families, the sales were just as much of a holiday. Sometimes pushing dinner to an unthinkable 4 P.M., we would leave the house earlier every year, dressed in ready-for-combat outfits consisting of comfy sneakers and tees. Meanwhile, our tías sometimes brought out the big guns, using their purses to push through crowds to get the best deals. Guerreras.

Another unforgettable memory? Black Friday sales used to just hit different, and sales were actually worth it. Nowadays? Year-round sales and the rise of online shopping now make the deals seem like an everyday thing, and price reductions aren’t as impressive. Nevertheless, we’re feeling nostalgic, so we’re looking back at all our most epic Black Friday traditions from yesteryear.

1. Camping out to get the best deals

There’s no doubt the sales used to hit different, when flat-screen TV’s and laptops were discounted more than 50% off for one day only. Who else camped out with their entire family and almost got trampled trying to get the best deals? Ah, memories.

2. Rushing out from our very late Sansgiving dinners in a panic

Another thing about us Latinos? We love eating late dinners, and our turkey meals come November are no exception. Only problem? Our family always stressed out about not getting to the B.F. sales early enough. Cue the arroz con mango!

3. Always. Buying. Luggage.


Thanksgiving meant eating the best mofongo-stuffed pavo in the world and heading out — to buy deeply-discounted luggage. Why are our parents still buying so many suitcases? One of the biggest Latino parent mysteries in the world!

4. Getting back from Black Friday shopping and putting up all the Christmas decorations

Likewise, another major part of the whole Black Friday outing was knowing you would still have to get back home and participate in holiday decorating. Dead tired from scoping out the cheapest Nikes, electronics, and winter jackets? Well, you’re one of Santa’s elves now, because your Hispanic mom just said so.

5. Watching movies with your Latino parents, eating Thanksgiving dinner, and heading out to the sales = priceless

While a lot of people critique the sales for running opposite to the true meaning of Thanksgiving, they still make for heartwarming memories. We’ll never forget watching holiday movies with our family, eating the best mashed potatoes, and heading out to Best Buy — just saying!

6. That moment your parents found out Black Friday is sort of a scam

Occasionally, parents will go from saving all of their Christmas shopping for Black Friday to boycotting it for life — at least once they realize it’s a bit of a scam. When Latino parents realize stores raise their prices before the sale, it all goes downhill… and it will be talked about every holiday dinner.

7. Napping? Never heard of her!

Meanwhile, we’ve always heard of that age-old tale about families eating Thanksgiving dinner in the afternoon (confusing, but O.K.), napping, and then heading out to the sales. While being nice and rested for the deals sounds great, that was never our situation. Can’t stop, won’t stop!

8. The combination of Thanksgiving cooking and Black Friday brought tension — it is what it is

If there’s one thing about Hispanic families that just unites us, it’s meaningless arguments we forget about 15 minutes later. While this often meant uncomfortable situations for your friends in the morning carpool (you know, when your mom just had to argue about your messy room), family fights are a part of us. The Black Friday rush sometimes meant things got heated, but all in the name of good deals.

9. We’ll never forget our parents prepping for months before the actual deals

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Being Latino unquestionably means having parents that scope out stores for months before November, taking pictures of blenders, air fryers, and coffee makers. Why? Well, all those items will be cheaper for the sales, and Hispanic parents are nothing if not prepared!

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