Things That Matter

A Teenage Football Player In Indiana Has Been Sentenced To Prison For Killing A Cheerleader Pregnant With His Baby

An Indiana teenager has confessed to killing a fellow student because she was too far along in her term pregnancy to have an abortion. Aaron Trejo was 16 years old when he and 17-year-old Breana Rouhselang started up the cliche football player-cheerleader romance that unwittingly resulted in a pregnancy. Trejo, a then-member in good standing of the school’s football team, was angry that Rouhselang waited until she was six months pregnant to tell him that he was the father. According to court documents, neither one of them wanted the child, but Trejo took matters into his own hands and spent a week planning her murder.

In December 2018, Trejo confessed to the murder. On Tuesday, he was sentenced to 65 years in prison for homicide and feticide.

Aaron Trejo stabbed her, choked her with her scarf and put her body in a dumpster.

CREDIT: ST. JOSEPH COUNTY POLICE DEPARTMENT

In December 2018, Trejo entered a ‘not guilty’ plea for the homicide of Rouhselang and for the feticide of their fetus. Earlier that week, police found Rouhselang’s body in a dumpster after she was reported missing. Rouhselang told her mom that she was going to meet Trejo around behind their Mishawaka home around 11 p.m. When her mom woke up a few hours later, around 1 a.m., she was concerned that Rouhselang was still not back. She went over to Trejo’s home, a few blocks away, to ask where Rouhselang was, but he told her that she never showed up to talk in the alley behind her home. He also told Rouhselang’s mother that he lost his phone and that she wouldn’t be able to reach him.

Investigators found Rouhselang’s glasses and a “stocking cap” that belonged to Rouhselang. “There was apparent blood on the hat,” a probable cause affidavit said.  Investigators searched the premises and businesses nearby and found her body in a dumpster with a black plastic garbage bag placed over her head and torso.

Trejo was brought in for questioning and within a few hours confessed to the whole thing.

CREDIT: BREANA ROUHSELANG / FACEBOOK

The investigator who interrogated Trejo said in an affidavit that “there were several pauses and quiet times” during the questioning. Soon enough, he asked Trejo if they ever fought about the pregnancy, to which “Aaron Trejo quietly said, ‘Yes.’ Aaron then explained that Breana waited too long to tell Aaron about the pregnancy to get an abortion,” according to the affidavit. When the detective asked Trejo “what he did about that,” he replied, “I took action … I took her life.”

Trejo had plotted to kill Rouhselang for a week. He brought a knife and a garbage bag from his home over to the alley behind her house where they were to meet and stabbed her in the heart. He thought that using a knife would kill her quickly. “Trejo said that he had been planning and thinking about killing Breana and the baby for about a week and had not told anybody,” the affidavit states. Trejo threw Rouhselang’s phone and knife into the river after he threw her body into a dumpster.

Autopsy reports found that she was also strangled with her own scarf.

CREDIT: BREANA ROUHSELANG / FACEBOOK

The autopsy confirmed that she died from multiple stab wounds and that “her scarf had been tied so tightly that strangulation was occurring before Breana died.” Rouhselang’s own father and stepmother had no idea that she was pregnant. “We’re just in shock, really. We’re in disbelief that this is going on,”  Breana’s stepmom, Nicole Rouhselang, told ABC. “I woke up this morning and wanted to send her a text. But, there’d be nobody on the other end.”

Trejo’s family has since been bombarded with hate messages on social media, but his aunt, Alexzaundra Patton-Manu told the New York Post that “We just want everybody to stop trying to harass everybody in our family. We didn’t do nothing wrong.” Patton-Mandu added that Trejo had suffered a “bad concussion” a few months prior and “that could have messed with his mind.” 

Breana Rouhselang has been remembered as a “precious, beautiful, innocent, well-loved young woman.”

CREDIT: BREANA ROUHSELANG / FACEBOOK

Rouhselang’s obituary cites that her baby would have been a girl, to be named Aurora MacKenzie Rouhselang. She was looking forward to receiving a letter at a sports banquet the afternoon after she was murdered, and planned to study athletic training in college. Breana Rouhselang was Mishawaka High School’s football team manager, a softball coach and a cheerleader. 

READ: A Man Didn’t Like How Slow Mexican Authorities Were Investigating So He Solved His Father’s Murder

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More Than 1,200 Women And Girls Have Gone Missing In Peru During The Pandemic And Officials Think They Know Why

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More Than 1,200 Women And Girls Have Gone Missing In Peru During The Pandemic And Officials Think They Know Why

Rodrigo Abd / Getty Images

Apart from combating the Coronavirus, Peru has suffered a heartbreaking increase in the number of missing women and girls. Just as hundreds of thousands of women took to the streets to demand an end to gender-based violence, the Coronavirus hit and those same marches have had to be put on hold.

Now, as millions of women are forced to stay at home under strict lockdown orders, they’re spending more time with potentially abusive partners or family members. Many experts believe this combination of circumstances is leading to an increase in domestic violence as hundreds of women in Peru have been reported missing since the start of the pandemic.

Hundreds of women and girls have gone missing since the start of the lockdown.

In Peru, hundreds of women and girls have gone missing and many are feared dead since lockdown orders were put into place to help contain the spread of Covid-19. According to authorities (including Peru’s women’s ministry), at least 1,2000 women and girls have been reported missing since the start of the pandemic – a much higher figure than during non-Coronavirus months.

“The figures are really quite alarming,” Isabel Ortiz, a top women’s rights official, told the Reuters news agency on Tuesday. “We know the numbers of women and girls who have disappeared, but we don’t have detailed information about how many have been found,” she said. “We don’t have proper and up-to-date records.”

Ortiz is pushing the government to start keeping records so that authorities can track those who go missing – whether they are found alive or dead and whether they are victims of sex trafficking, domestic violence or femicide.

The women’s ministry said the government was working to eradicate violence against women and had increased funding this year for gender-based violence prevention programs.

Like many Latin American countries, Peru has long suffered from reports of domestic violence.

Credit: Cecile Lafranco / Getty Images

The Andean nation home to 33 million people has long had a domestic violence problem, but the home confinement measures because of the pandemic has made the situation worse, said Eliana Revollar, who leads the women’s rights office of the National Ombudsman’s office, an independent body that monitors Peru’s human rights.

Before COVID-19, five women were reported missing in Peru every single day, but since the lockdown, that number has surged to eight a day. Countries worldwide have reported increases in domestic violence under coronavirus lockdowns, prompting the United Nations to call for urgent government action.

According to the UN, Latin America has the world’s highest rates of femicide, defined as the gender-motivated killing of women. Almost 20 million women and girls a year are estimated to endure sexual and physical violence in the region.

Latin America and the Caribbean are known for high rates of femicide and violence against women, driven by a macho culture and social norms that dictate women’s roles, Ortiz said. She added, “Violence against women exists because of the many patriarchal patterns that exist in our society.”

“There are many stereotypes about the role of women that set how their behaviour should be, and when these are not adhered to, violence is used against women,” she said.

Before the pandemic, hundreds of thousands of women throughout Latin America, including Peru, were staging mass street demonstrations demanding that their governments should act against gender-based violence.

Meanwhile, the country is also struggling to contain the Coronavirus pandemic.

Credit: Cecile Lafranco / Getty Images

Despite implementing one of the world’s longest running stay-at-home orders, Peru has become one of the hardest hit countries. As of August 11, Peru has confirmed more than 483,000 cases of Coronavirus and 21,276 people have died.

Hospitals are struggling to cope with the rising number of patients and healthcare workers have protested against a lack of personal protective equipment (PPE).

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This Man Was Robbed Of His Life Savings Just Minutes After Leaving The Bank

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This Man Was Robbed Of His Life Savings Just Minutes After Leaving The Bank

@naninizhoni / Twitter

Imagine having worked your life to provide a better future for your family only to have it stolen from you in a brazen attack. That’s exactly what happened to one immigrant man who had taken out his life savings from a Chase Bank when we was brutally attacked and robbed of more than $200,000 in cash.

The attack was caught on video and police are searching for the suspect. Meanwhile, the victim and his family are asking for help as the money was being used to support family across Mexico and El Salvador and to help put a child through graduate school.

A man has lost his life savings after being attacked and robbed outside a Chase Bank.

Police are searching for a suspect after a man was robbed of his life savings outside a Chase Bank. In Huntington Park, California, Francisco Cornejo had taken out $200,000 from the bank following the recent sale of his home, when an unknown assailant grabbed his satchel and ran away. 

Cornejo fell to the ground as a result, video taken by a bystander showed. The assailant’s face could not be seen in the video, but he was wearing a black hoodie.

“Within 30 seconds of just getting to his car, he was grabbed, beaten, robbed, and they took everything from him,” Cornejo’s attorney, Nathan Soleimani, told KTLA.

“He was parked as closely as possible to the bank, knowing he was going to withdraw a large amount of cash. As soon as he got to his car, before he was able to get to his car, he was grabbed and beaten,” attorney Nathan Soleimani said.

A family man, Cornejo had withdrawn the cash for the well-being of his loved ones, Soleimani said, adding that the family has no idea who would attack and rob his client. 

His daughter said her unemployed parents needed the money to “get through” the coronavirus pandemic, to support her 94-year-old grandmother, pay for her sister’s graduate school tuition and send funds to loved ones in Mexico and El Salvador. 

“This money was hard-earned and as a result of years and years of work,” she said. 

Cornejo was left severely injured and suffered a very traumatic experience.

In Spanish, Cornejo told KTLA that the entire experience and robbery were “traumatic.” And he suffered the injuries to prove it.

Cornejo was left with significant bruises on his side and arm, and his shoulder was dislocated. He also suffered severe trauma to the head, his daughter said in a GoFundMe page created to help with hospital expenses. 

“He never expected such an atrocious attack,” the daughter said. “Bystanders attest that my dad was fighting with all of his will. My father was dragged by the criminal as they both fought for the bag.”

Unfortunately, this isn’t the first time this has happened – even in the past month.

Crime has recently started rising in big cities – especially crimes targeting immigrants. A recent story out of San Francisco is very similar to what happened to Cornejo. A senior couple, who came to the U.S. nearly 40 years ago, was left heartbroken after their life savings was taken from them in a brazen daytime burglary that was caught on camera.

Simon Zhong recalls the moment he learned two men forced their way inside his parent’s Crocker Amazon home. Stunning surveillance video from outside and inside the home, shows how the men used a crowbar to pry open a back door and enter while Simon’s parents were out.

His parents, immigrants from China, spent more than 35 years working in construction and housekeeping.

“My parents actually grew up really poor in China,” he said. “They actually borrowed money to come over to America and they worked every single day of their life.”

Not trusting the banking system, his dad kept their entire life savings, in cash, in a safe, only for it to disappear in less than 15 minutes. A senior law enforcement official who didn’t want to be identified confirmed Asian American families are often targets for criminals because they keep cash in their homes.

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