entertainment

When You’re In The Mood For Perreo, This Latina Has You Covered

This is Tomasa Del Real, a Chilena who is redefining reggaetón.

Mis favoritas! @galiocl ? #neoperreo

A photo posted by Tomasa Del Real (@tomasadelreal) on

The tattoo artist-turned-Rhianna-of-South America is churning out crazy addictive songs about sex, drugs, the internet, and forlorn love.

Miau miau yo si que era tu gata #pachuca #neoperreo #tomasadelreal #bienymal ⚗

A photo posted by Tomasa Del Real (@tomasadelreal) on


Once a male-dominated genre, Tomasa has emerged on the scene as one of the new faces of reggaetón. It’s not just her low-budget yet ingenious music videos that’ll get you hooked, it’s her sultry, upbeat rhythms that will make you a hardcore fan.

What does reggaetón even mean in 2016? 


Reggaetón evokes names like Daddy Yankee, Wisin y Yandel, and Don Omar – but it’s not 2005 anymore. A new regime of reggaetón has risen. No longer a genre associated with clubs tucked away in barrios, acts such as NAAFI, Rosa Pistola, Farina, and Tomasa del Real have turned reggaetón into a mainstream favorite. Del Real told The Fader she believes reggaetón is now Latin America’s pop music.

Every aspect of her music is unique.


Released back in February, her heart-wrenching yet insanely catchy “Tu Señora,” featuring Stockholm- based Talisto, is about dealing with a long distance relationship. The very DIY video goes back and forth from what looks like the snowy Patagonia to the beaches of Iquique, Chile. You can check out her debut album, “Bien y Mal,” on YouTube.

She’ll definitely make you want to dance.


Tomasa’s songs range from slow and haunting to fast and jolting. They’ve become the soundtrack to perreo, a popular dance similar to grinding. To top it off, her goth-alt-90s-Chicana vibe makes her a style an original.

Wondering what “perreo” means? 

CREDIT: TUMBLR / SOURCE: lagiocondasmile
CREDIT: CREDIT: TUMBLR / SOURCE: lagiocondasmile

Perreo is a dance that has origins in the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico. In the last couple of years, perreando has become surprisingly mainstream among dance parties and clubs in Latin America.

Del Real’s personal story is also inspiring. 

Gracias por el gorro cabros #dirtylifexsiempre #trap #chile

A photo posted by Tomasa Del Real (@tomasadelreal) on


Del Real (real name: Valeria Cisterna), says kids used to tease her by calling her Tomasa, but she eventually took to the name because it sounded both masculine and feminine. She said that she feels like “a man but very much a woman.”

She wasn’t always a musician. The 29-year-old originally studied design in Santiago and became a traveling tattoo artist. Making her away across South America, she would ink during the day and DJ reggaetón parties at night.

Hola estoy en Lima ✌️✨ si quieres tatuarte escribeme! +56982027888

A photo posted by Tomasa Del Real (@tomasadelreal) on

She’s also a poet. 

En la música como en mi vida he creado mi propia fórmula. Soy única y autentica. #DOYou #PUMAWomen www.doyou.cl ???

A photo posted by Tomasa Del Real (@tomasadelreal) on


Watching Tomasa sing in her sports bra and exercise shorts, it’s clear to see that this woman is destined for stardom. Her poetic modern day lyrics are relatable, like in “Es de Noche,” when she sings: “No me dejes sola, por favor, que sin Internet no como y me muero.”

She studies her craft. 

Mensaje de voz #neoperreo #bae @rip_txny @tomasadelreal ⛓⛓⛓

A photo posted by Tomasa Del Real (@tomasadelreal) on


A self-described “reggaetón nerd” Tomasa told The Clinic that she researches reggaetón every day. She spends the morning lying in bed blasting reggaetón, and regularly texts with friends about the latest remixes.

And her star continues to rise. 

A quien le importan los roles y los estereotipos? A mi, no ahhaha #DoYou #PumaWomen www.doyou.cl ???

A video posted by Tomasa Del Real (@tomasadelreal) on


After building underground fame in South America the last couple years, Tomasa’s popularity has finally spread across Latin America and beyond.


Ibeyi: Afro-Cuban Electro Via Paris

Like this story? Click on the share button below to send to your friends. 

Victoria Cruz Sees Hope For The Future Of LGBTQ+ Rights 50 Years After She Witnessed The Stonewall Riots

Things That Matter

Victoria Cruz Sees Hope For The Future Of LGBTQ+ Rights 50 Years After She Witnessed The Stonewall Riots

iamsamkirk / Instagram

The history of Gay Rights in the country date back to the late ’60s and the epicenter was Manhattan. The core fighters of the LGBTQ community include Marsha P. Johnson, Scott G. Brown, Sylvia Rivera, and a slew of other pioneers. The sad thing is this generation has passed or will very soon, which is why we have to honor their legacy while they’re still alive. One of those people is an inspiring person in our Latinx community.

Victoria Cruz, who is in her 70s, is a survivor of the Stonewall Riots and is still very much a part of the fight for LGBTQ rights.

Instagram/@marinadelbey

Cruz, who was born in Puerto Rico, is one of 11 children that grew up in New York. While Cruz was born a male, she knew since she was in high school that she was a woman. Back in the ’60s, that was no easy thing to admit, yet her Puerto Rican family supported her transition.

While her family and close community were supportive, Cruz faced immense hardships including harassment from the police, and later in the ’90s, she was assaulted.

Instagram/@hispanic_history_

Four of her coworkers physically assaulted her, which left her in ruins.

“I was very angry. Very angry,” Cruz said in an interview with Vanity Fair in 2017. “The worst part of it is that I couldn’t feel the ground beneath me, and added that she was “was contemplating suicide,” at the time.

But she overcame that tough time and is recognized as a leader in the movement for Gay Rights.

Yet, despite the hate and violence she faced, Cruz pushed on standing up for her LGBTQ+ family.

“I used to go to St. Vincent’s on my lunch hour…and I would see her,” Cruz told The Advocate. “She called to me, ‘Victoria, come here.’ And she always called me Dickie, you know, so when she said, ‘Victoria come here,’ I knew that she meant business. I sat down, and she looked at me. She said, ‘Try to keep the community together because we are our own worst enemy. And there’s power in numbers.’ And then she said, ‘The world will come up to try to divide us, and when you divide a community, you conquer it. So try to keep the community together.’”

As a trans woman and pioneer of the LGBTQ movement, Cruz said positive change is happening right now.

Instagram/@florentinoreyes

“I’m optimistic, and I’m hopeful that it will change for the better,” she told The Advocate. “There’s power in numbers. If we unite and keep united, we can make the future different, and what we want it to be. By galvanizing one another, we galvanize each other. And with the same frame of mind, the same frame of thought, we can change what’s happening.”

Trans rights are the new frontier in the LGBTQ+ movement. Despite the contributions made to the movement by trans women of color, cis members of the LGBTQ+ community ignore their plight or add to the harassment.

“There is so much hatred directed toward queer people, particularly transgender women of color. For what? Why? I think it may be about people’s own insecurities about their own identities and sexualities. And further, people don’t know their history,” Cruz told BC/Stories. “The transgender experience isn’t new. It’s as old as the human experience, and anyone who does their research would know this. I think society needs to be educated, and maybe after being educated, empathy will follow.”

READ: Zuri Moreno Made Sure The Trans Community In Montana Remained Safe

Keds Latest Designs Proves That Avoiding Cultural Appropriation In Fashion Is Totally Possible

Culture

Keds Latest Designs Proves That Avoiding Cultural Appropriation In Fashion Is Totally Possible

Keds

It’s always really cool to see a big name brand embrace the art of our Latinidad. It’s like a nod to all of the great Latinx artisans who add beauty and color to our culture. In fact, seeing consumers enthusiastically welcome these goods feels like further validation. With this in mind, it makes this new collaboration all the sweeter for us art and fashion lovers.

Keds is collaborating with designers Thelma Dávila and Lolita Mia on a line inspired by the Latina-created brands.

Instagram / @Keds

In what the shoe company is calling a “collaboration fiesta,” Keds released three fun and vibrant new designs.

Some of the shoes borrow inspiration from Thelma Dávila’s colorful Guatemalan textiles. Alternatively, other pairs utilize Lolita Mia’s festive fringe as embellishments. These touches combine with Keds’ original platform shoes to make a unique product.

Of the partnership with these new brands, Keds’ website says:

“It’s so rewarding to be able to be a part of the professional and personal growth of women who decided to follow their dreams. Entrepreneurs (especially female ones) are always brave, they’re risk-takers that believe strongly in themselves. And we believe in them too. We’re so excited to introduce you to our latest for-women-by-women collaborations.”

The Thelma Dávila brand is named after its Guatemalan founder.

Keds

The company specializes in designing and crafting unique pieces by hand. Furthermore, their products utilize Guatemalan textiles, leathers and non-leather materials. Obviously, this collaboration is built on a solid relationship between the two brands. Since last year, Keds retail locations have carried Thelma Dávila bags and products in stores.

On their website, Keds said the design collaborations were intent on “taking geometric design and color cues from [Dávila’s] native culture, our classic Triple Kick gets transformed into a fiesta-ready standout.”

Founded by jewelry artisan and entrepreneur, Elena Gil, Lolita Mia is a Costa Rican accessory brand.

Keds

While studying abroad in Italy, Gil made a significant personal discovery. She realized that ethnic crafts and traditions were very alike across regions. Specifically, they were similar in cultural importance. In light of this, she decided to start her own brand. Lolita Mia’s handmade products embrace what Gil has coined a “Universal Ethnic Luxury.”

Of the collaboration with Lolita Mia, Keds’ website reads:

“[The] aesthetic shines through in these playful renditions of our platforms in the form of fun, festive fringe and punchy tropical shades.”

The Ked × Lolita Mia collaboration has two designs while the Ked x Thelma Dávila collab is made up of one.

Instagram / @lolitamiacr

“Triple Tassel” is a multicolored platform with purple, pink, orange and white tassels attached to the laces. “Triple Decker Fringe” is an off-white platform slip-on with multi-colored fringe and golden embellishments on top. The “Triple Kick” features a neutral platform with Guatemalan textile accents around the bottom.

Each design is priced at $70 a pair. Moreover, they are available exclusively on Keds’ website. Be sure to order yours today and add a little extra Latinx flare to your summer looks.

Paid Promoted Stories