Check Out These Resilient Latinos Who Are Moving Their Nation Pa’lante

The list of challenges we faced in 2020 seems never-ending but this year more than ever, Latinos stepped up to move their nation forward. People are using their voice and taking action to make their communities a better place and these unsung heroes deserve all the praise. That’s why we’ve partnered with Xfinity to promote Latino resilience and shine a light on these individuals  that made something happen for their community in an effort to help push our nation forward. No matter how small a deed may seem, a contribution is a critical thread of pushing our country forward. Here are their stories on how these individuals are moving their nation pa’lante:

Cynthia — Montebello, Calif.

Living in Montebello, Calif., I noticed that many people do not ride bikes in the community — mainly because they feel the streets are unsafe. After many years of advocacy work, with the help of our community, I was able to secure state funds to build cycling lanes in the city of Montebello. This small action will help keep our cycling neighbors safer and healthier in the city. 

Sandra Adis — Los Angeles

I am the daughter of immigrant parents from El Salvador. My team and I have worked really hard to try to bring a little bit of plant joy to our community by donating plants to senior homes in South Central Los Angeles. 

Miguel Escobar — Pasadena, Calif.

As a high school history teacher, I’m a strong believer in mentorship and leading by example. My experience in being Mexican and Salvadorian, I know oftentimes we lack strong male Latinx role models. My ancestry is mixed Mexican and Salvadoran. I push my kids to participate in community service that reminds them to put service above self. This includes political activism projects to educate historically disenfranchised BIPOC communities on their voting rights and volunteering at the local food bank that services their community.

Beatriz Espinoza — Los Angeles

I work as a paralegal at an immigration law firm. I love my job and what I do because I get to help and provide a sense of comfort for people going through immigration legal proceedings. I have been going into my office and working hard through COVID because cases have not stopped coming in and I feel this is a small way to give back to my community.

Martha Arias — West Covina, Calif.

As a bilingual surgery coordinator part of my responsibilities is to coordinate operating room cases for our surgical candidates. I take a lot of pride in what I do and feel very honored to assist my people with Spanish interpretation of their surgical needs such as appointments, instructions, and all corresponding information to help put their minds at ease. I treat each and every patient as if they are my own family members.

Rudy Espinoza — Los Angeles

I work for a community development organization where the team and I are advocating for some of the most vulnerable entrepreneurs in Los Angeles. Not only are we pushing for policy that protects them, but we are also getting cash into their hands through our micro-loan programs and the Street Vendor Emergency Fund that we created with our partners. Since the pandemic landed in LA, we’ve helped over 1,000 street vendors with $400 cash cards.

No matter how big or small, the actions of these individuals are moving the nation forward with so much pride.

We are all critical threads to the fabric that make up this country. Xfinity is celebrating the diverse voices of our Latino community and all the ways we move the world pa’lante. Join us and share yours.

Visit https://fabricofthenation.com/voices.  

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