Entertainment

Latinas talk “Imposter Syndrome”

Imposter syndrome. It may happen when you finally got accepted to college and have found yourself overwhelmed by the student body, or when you accepted that dream job, or even while doing your job. It can happen in relationships, in friendships. Basically anywhere and amongst us Latinas too. Even despite our hard work and much-earned credentials.

We wanted to talk about Imposter’s Syndrome and how to deal with it, so we reached out to our FIERCE audience on Instagram for their thoughts.

Latinas got real with their responses about feeling as if they were undeserving.

Check them out below!

Remind yourself that you’ve worked hard and are deserving.

“Thank you for posting this! I actually just got hired on as a school counselor and I’m feeling this intensely right now. I have to keep reminding myself that I worked so hard for this and that I AM WORTH IT!” – adelitafamania

Understand that anything can trigger it.

“It happens to me every single day on so many levels. It’s been holding me back my whole life and I keep pushing against it, some days it gets the better of me but I won’t give up on myself even when I really feel I’m not capable. I get so stressed all the time thinking someone is going to discover that I’m not smart, or fun, or whatever it is at that moment that I shut down. It’s so good to openly discuss it with friends or even professional help.” – pinatapink

And it can lead to social anxiety.

“This is so hard, I feel like this nearly every day. Lately, it’s been getting in the way of my entire purpose and whether or not I want to work hard at all. I tend to think, “Like for what? I don’t deserve to have the things I want because I didn’t work hard enough.” Yet, I did. Probably more than anyone else in my programs, jobs, teams, even my friend group. This is so tough and often it leads to my social anxiety which affects a whole multitude of behavioral patterns like procrastination and chronic lateness.” –curlsofroses

But you can battle it by not shrugging off your achievements.

“Happens to me all the time. And when people give me praise I tend to say “oh it’s not a big deal.” But I’m trying to remember that I’m enough and hell yeah I’m a big deal.” – erika_kiks18

Because it can happen to brain surgeons and Fortune 500 CEOs too.

“Our country and our community has been through a lot since the middle of March. Now more than ever is the time to nourish our goals and inspirations. In my podcast, I bring together some of the highest achieving Latinos that our country has to offer: Dr. Quinoñes-Hinojosa: who went from migrant farm worker to a world-renowned brain surgeon
Hector Ruiz: one of the very few Latinos to be a Fortune 500 CEO of an American Company Louis Barajas: the #1 financial Latino expert in the USA. (He is most likely your favorite Reggaeton artist’s to-go financial guy.)
Cesar Garcia: an actor who has seen. dozens of times in music videos, shows, and movies. He’s known for his roles in Fast and Furious and Breaking Bad. Chef Aarón Sánchez: The most well-known Latin Chef in the country. Find an episode that catches your attention or share an episode to a friend of loved one that would like to hear from other Latinos on how they achieved their dreams and goals.” – trailblazinglatinospodcast

And you can cure it by not reminding yourself to not give weight to other people’s thoughts.

“I cured mine by not giving a fck! The enemy is a LIEEEE.” –stephaniesaraii

And last but not least, know that it can be hard to defeat but you ARE worthy.

“This was me on the first day after I transferred to University. The feeling still follows me sometimes. It hard to defeat.” – dianalajandre

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Amy Coney Barrett Has Refused To Acknowledge That Systematic Racism Exists

Things That Matter

Amy Coney Barrett Has Refused To Acknowledge That Systematic Racism Exists

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We know LGBTQ rights, birth control, and race are under threat as Amy Coney Barrett as President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee. We know that that conservative judge has been evasive in answering comments about her beliefs which, if appointed, would steer her in making fundamental decisions that could affect American citizens’ lives for decades. Still, though we knew things are bound to go sideways as most things under the Trump administration have, we didn’t realize that an educated woman living in today’s world would refuse to acknowledge a basic societal fact: that “systemic racism” exists in the United States.

In written responses submitted Tuesday night, Barrett repeated her refusal to say whether “systemic racism” exists in our country.

After Sen. Mazie Hirono, Democrat of Hawaii asked her to explain her view of the existence of “systemic racism” in the United States, Barret refused the opportunity to acknowledge its existence.

“At the hearing, you acknowledged that racism persists in our country, but you refused to answer where there is systemic racism, calling it a ‘policy question.’ You also refused to answer other questions based on your view that they are ‘policy questions,’” Hirono wrote in his questions. “What makes a statement a policy question rather than a question of fact?”

“I believe that racism persists in our country, but as I explained at the hearing, whether there is ‘systemic racism’ is a public policy question of substantial controversy, as evidenced by the disagreement among senators on this very question during the hearing,” Barrett replied. “As a sitting judge and judicial nominee, it would be inappropriate for me to offer an opinion on the matter.”

Barrett’s approach to the question is not totally uncommon. Previous Supreme Court nominees have avoided answering questions concerning precedent. Barrett clung to the approach during her confirmation hearing last week while sitting before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Barrett used this as a standard and repeatedly cited it as a reason for dodging questions.

Systemic racism exists within our country without question.

It persists in our academic settings, workplaces, as well as in our court and judicial system. The fact is that when a certain group dominates a majority of positions of decision-making power, others struggle to exist and get by let alone get ahead. For generations and right now, white people have been the dominating group with decision-making power and people of color have suffered as a result. Acknowledgment is a vital part of making this change. Particularly from our leaders.

The Senate Judiciary Committee will vote on Barrett’s confirmation on Thursday afternoon.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Women Are Sharing The Scariest Parts About Being A Woman

Fierce

Women Are Sharing The Scariest Parts About Being A Woman

Halloween is supposed to be the scariest time of year, but 2020 is a reminder that there are worse things than goblins and ghouls. From Pandemics to unhinged world leaders we’ve seen it all. Recently, we started wondering about this reality and how the concept of being constantly on edge might seem “new” to certain people: men. After all, as women, we know that in parts of a world our bodies are viewed as a threat or something that’s not worth cherishing.

We dug around Reddit to find out what the scariest part of being a woman tends to be for some and found some truly heartbreaking answers.

Check them out below.

“Walking alone to your car at nightlevel.” –smelly_and_stinky

“The fact that I really have no idea which men are going to lash out at me for not reciprocating their attention to me.”- apittsburghoriginal

“Like violently lashing out? I never got that. Like if a girl doesn’t reciprocate engagement..move on. Why get all bent out of shape, it’s not going to make a woman change her mind.” – qpalz11=

“Walking alone in a strange neighborhood… in the dark… thinking of all the ways you could imagine someone kidnapping you… and then selling you… and using you…” – kolett1996

“Dealing with whatever hormones throw at you.” – jecabells

“Men. Night. Men at night.” – girlwiththegoldendog

“Walking alone from the bar to your home drunk in a skirt at night and seeing only drunk men who are stronger than you.” – d-light8

“For me it would be giving birth. I have no kids (yet)…level 2Comment deleted by user.”ch1kita

“An unwanted pregnancy. What if I have sex and use all types of birth control and i STILL get pregnant. Or what happens if I’m raped and I get the morning after pill and for some weird reason it doesn’t work. I live in a liberal state so as long as I make a decision early on, I can get an abortion. But who would I share that information with, without being judged? And what if I’m not in a state that lets me get an abortion, what would happen to me? Every day is a struggle for me, so I fear that I would end up killing myself.” – Ojitheunseen

“You could get an IUD, use normal protection like male/female condoms, and then have the pill and abortion as a fallback. Seems foolproof.” – chaoticneutral_ju

“Pregnancy denial. Like “I haven’t have my periods in two months that’s so cool” and this idea crosses your mind before telling yourself “impossible, I’ve been single for more than nine months, everything ‘s OK.” Or as they said below : having to walk near a group of men at night and not being able to make a detour since they smoke right in front of your residence door.” – chaoticneutral_ju

“I hated the pregnancy and birth part. I had the best care, but I still felt like a piece of meat. I got tired from everyone sticking their hands up my vagina. Blood works. Sonograms. I got tired and exhausted from being in pain in my nether regions. To me, the amount of pain and the potential health risks to me and the baby – it was the scariest part. Having placenta fall out of you like in some National Geographic documentary. And then you have to check out if your blood clots aren’t too large. And when they are, you back into hospital, they push on your underbelly and nibble around in your vagina, to get them out. Argh I’m done. I’m glad I have both of my kids and I’m out of those woods. Fuck that shit.”- TortillasaurusRex

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com