Entertainment

“La Borinqueña” Celebrates 125th Anniversary Of Puerto Rican Flag With Special Cover

“La Borinqueña” is a comic first created by Edgardo Miranda-Rodriguez in 2016. The graphic novels have been more than literature. The graphic novel has raised money for Puerto Rican causes and has served as a cultural point of pride for people from the Caribbean island. The latest cover of “La Borinqueña” is no different.

The new cover for the latest “La Borinqueña” graphic novel is a testament to the protesting spirit of the island.

La Borinqueña is joined by a handful of famous Puerto Ricans who have used their name to fight for causes they care about in Puerto Rico. Rosario Dawson, Bad Bunny, Ricky Martin, Residente, and iLe are all on the cover marching with La Borinqueña flying above them.

Puerto Rico has been a pressure cooker of activism and protests in recent years following the disastrous Hurricane Maria.

Puerto Ricans felt abandoned by the federal government following the devastating hurricane that knocked out power to the island in 2017. American citizens were begging for help to rebuild but were left behind in the relief efforts being handed out to Florida and Texas that year. Since then, the island has been rocked by political scandals, mismanagement of relief supplies, and a series of earthquakes.

Following the hurricane, a political scandal involving then-governor Ricardo Rosselló stunned Puerto Ricans on the island and around the world.

Gov. Rosselló was part of a group chat scandal that ended his political career. In the chat, Gov. Rosselló and other government officials spoke in degrading terms about women and the LGBTQ+ community. The grotesque chats are released after Puerto Ricans protested a religious freedom bill supported by Gov. Rosselló. Bad Bunny and Ricky Martin joined forces to go to the governor’s mansion in San Juan to discuss the bill and the need for it to not pass. The protesters won that fight and the anti-LGBTQ+ legislation was not made into law.

The governor was also embroiled in a financial scandal with funds being misappropriated with government contracts. Millions of dollars were being mismanaged and given to people not qualified for the contracts.

Bad Bunny paused an international tour to fly back to Puerto Rico to fight against Gov. Rosselló. The musician told his fans that he had to do the right thing and that meant taking a pause from his tour and fighting alongside other Puerto Ricans. Bad Bunny made it up to fans after fighting for the future of the island that he wants to see.

Puerto Ricans called on Gov. Rosselló to resign over the released chats and the mismanagement of government funds.

The people of Puerto Rico won that fight too. The island saw prolonged and large protests drawing the world’s attention to the allegations of corruption against Gov. Rosselló. The sustained pressure from Puerto Ricans and the international community forced the governor to resign from his office. Crowds of Puerto Ricans cheered for the announcement in a unified celebration.

“La Borinqueña” is celebrating this resilient spirit of Puerto Rico in the new cover.

Puerto Ricans are not shy about flexing their protesting muscles. The people of the island have shown that they are not afraid to take to the street to force the kind of change they want to see. Much like other places in the world, like Hong Kong, the people of Puerto Rico will not back down from what they demand.

You can order your digital copy of the latest “La Borinqueña” graphic novel now.

Pa’lante, Puerto Rico.

READ: Exclusive: Luis Fonsi’s Tour Is Canceled But The Boricua Is Working Tirelessly To Raise Money For Puerto Rico

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Latin Music Revenue in the U.S. Grew in 2020, Up 20 Percent in Streaming

Entertainment

Latin Music Revenue in the U.S. Grew in 2020, Up 20 Percent in Streaming

STILLZ

Despite the COVID-19 pandemic that grips the globe, Latin music in the U.S. saw a 20 percent rise in streaming revenue in 2020. The genre posted a fifth consecutive year of overall revenue growth last year, according to the RIAA on Wednesday.

Latin music posted its best revenue in the U.S. since 2005.

The RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) released the 2020 year-end report on Latin music.

“Latin music continues to ‘punch above its weight’ – posting its fifth straight year of growth amidst the challenges and disruptions of the COVID economy,” wrote RIAA COO Michele Ballantyne in an annual revenue report.

After accounting for 5 percent of overall music revenue in the U.S. in 2019, that percentage rose to 5.4 percent last year. Latin music is heavily consumed on streaming and video platforms. Revenue for the genre is at its highest since 2005, the era when reggaeton music first broke through thanks to Puerto Rican acts like Daddy Yankee, Ivy Queen, and Tego Caulderón.

Bad Bunny had the highest-certified Latin music single of 2020.

Over a decade later, and it’s still reggaeton and Boricua artists that are leading the pack of Latin music stars. According to the RIAA, Bad Bunny’s “Yo Perreo Sola” was the highest-certified Latin music single of 2020. The hit song from his Grammy and Latin Grammy-winning YHLQMDLG album was certified 24-times Diamante. The RIAA is responsible for certifying albums and singles as platinum and gold. Latin music accounted for 15 percent of the certifications in 2020.

The news about Bad Bunny shouldn’t be a surprise as Spotify revealed last year that he was the most-streamed artist globally on the platform. He was followed by Canadian superstar Drake and Colombian reggaeton singer J Balvin.

The RIAA credits Latin music’s 20 percent streaming growth in 2020 to the fans who are turning to paid streaming subscriptions. YouTube is another major platform where Latin music is consumed. Billboard reported that 30 percent of the top 100 music videos of 2020 were from Latin music artists.  

Click here for Latido Music, 24/7 Latin music videos & more

Read: Bad Bunny and Kali Uchis Win Their First Grammy Awards, Jhay Cortez Performs “Dákiti” with Benito

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Ozuna Goes Corridos Tumbados With Ovi in “Envidioso” Music Video

Latidomusic

Ozuna Goes Corridos Tumbados With Ovi in “Envidioso” Music Video

OVI_OFICIAL / INSTAGRAM

Ozuna is the latest reggaeton superstar to get into the world of corridos tumbados. The Boricua singer teams up with rising Cuban artist Ovi in the music video for “Envidioso.”

Ovi is helping globalize the corridos tumbados sound.

Ovi is the artist that’s getting all the reggaeton and Latin trap stars to embrace the corridos tumbados sound. On his most recent album, Retumban2, he teamed up with artists like Mora, Myke Towers, Mariah Angeliq, and CJ. Bad Bunny was the first reggaeton artist to jump over to the corridos tumbados side when he joined Mexican singer Natanael Cano on the “Soy El Diablo” remix in 2019.

Ovi wanted to collaborate with Ozuna and he made it happen.

Ovi getting Ozuna in his song “Envidioso” was a moment of manifesting. The Rancho Humilde artist wrote on Instagram before that it was a goal of his to collaborate with Ozuna and he made that a reality.

To be honest, “Envidioso” is not a full corridos tumbados song, but rather a musical compromise between the genre and the emerging drill music sound. The corridos guitar can be heard over a fresh trap music beat. Like in CJ’s “Whoopty” remix, Ozuna comes through with bars. Ovi holds his own as they unite in keeping the haters in check. This genre-bending collaboration just oozes with swagger.

Ozuna and Ovi are having a blast in the music video for “Envidioso.” Whether they’re working in the back of a restaurant together, in the aisles of a generic Oxxo, or flexing in front of a sports car, these guys find the time to vibe to their song. This duo shares fun on-screen chemistry as collaborators.

Click here for Latido Music, 24/7 Latin music videos & more

Read: Ovi is Globalizing Corridos Tumbados: Our 5 Favorite Songs on ‘Retumban2’

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