Entertainment

“La Borinqueña” Celebrates 125th Anniversary Of Puerto Rican Flag With Special Cover

“La Borinqueña” is a comic first created by Edgardo Miranda-Rodriguez in 2016. The graphic novels have been more than literature. The graphic novel has raised money for Puerto Rican causes and has served as a cultural point of pride for people from the Caribbean island. The latest cover of “La Borinqueña” is no different.

The new cover for the latest “La Borinqueña” graphic novel is a testament to the protesting spirit of the island.

La Borinqueña is joined by a handful of famous Puerto Ricans who have used their name to fight for causes they care about in Puerto Rico. Rosario Dawson, Bad Bunny, Ricky Martin, Residente, and iLe are all on the cover marching with La Borinqueña flying above them.

Puerto Rico has been a pressure cooker of activism and protests in recent years following the disastrous Hurricane Maria.

Puerto Ricans felt abandoned by the federal government following the devastating hurricane that knocked out power to the island in 2017. American citizens were begging for help to rebuild but were left behind in the relief efforts being handed out to Florida and Texas that year. Since then, the island has been rocked by political scandals, mismanagement of relief supplies, and a series of earthquakes.

Following the hurricane, a political scandal involving then-governor Ricardo Rosselló stunned Puerto Ricans on the island and around the world.

Gov. Rosselló was part of a group chat scandal that ended his political career. In the chat, Gov. Rosselló and other government officials spoke in degrading terms about women and the LGBTQ+ community. The grotesque chats are released after Puerto Ricans protested a religious freedom bill supported by Gov. Rosselló. Bad Bunny and Ricky Martin joined forces to go to the governor’s mansion in San Juan to discuss the bill and the need for it to not pass. The protesters won that fight and the anti-LGBTQ+ legislation was not made into law.

The governor was also embroiled in a financial scandal with funds being misappropriated with government contracts. Millions of dollars were being mismanaged and given to people not qualified for the contracts.

Bad Bunny paused an international tour to fly back to Puerto Rico to fight against Gov. Rosselló. The musician told his fans that he had to do the right thing and that meant taking a pause from his tour and fighting alongside other Puerto Ricans. Bad Bunny made it up to fans after fighting for the future of the island that he wants to see.

Puerto Ricans called on Gov. Rosselló to resign over the released chats and the mismanagement of government funds.

The people of Puerto Rico won that fight too. The island saw prolonged and large protests drawing the world’s attention to the allegations of corruption against Gov. Rosselló. The sustained pressure from Puerto Ricans and the international community forced the governor to resign from his office. Crowds of Puerto Ricans cheered for the announcement in a unified celebration.

“La Borinqueña” is celebrating this resilient spirit of Puerto Rico in the new cover.

Puerto Ricans are not shy about flexing their protesting muscles. The people of the island have shown that they are not afraid to take to the street to force the kind of change they want to see. Much like other places in the world, like Hong Kong, the people of Puerto Rico will not back down from what they demand.

You can order your digital copy of the latest “La Borinqueña” graphic novel now.

Pa’lante, Puerto Rico.

READ: Exclusive: Luis Fonsi’s Tour Is Canceled But The Boricua Is Working Tirelessly To Raise Money For Puerto Rico

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Ivy Queen And Nesi Joined Bad Bunny On Stage For This Epic “Yo Perreo Sola” Remix

Entertainment

Ivy Queen And Nesi Joined Bad Bunny On Stage For This Epic “Yo Perreo Sola” Remix

Kevin Mazur / Getty Images

Of course, 2020 will go down in history as an absolute pesadilla of a year. From our politics and racial inequality to the Coronavirus pandemic, we’ve seen and experienced the absolute worst this year. It’s been a constant onslaught that it seems like our lives are dominated by bad news 24/7. And that’s not exactly a lie.

But if there’s one silver lining to 2020 – it’s been the music.

From surprise releases by Bad Bunny and Maluma and several new singles from J Balvin to chart-topping bops from Cardi B and Karol G, the music this year has been pure fire. It’s truly helped so many people get through 2020 and now with award season approaching, we’re likely to get some extra good bits.

That’s exactly what Bad Bunny had in mind for us as he took the stage last night with two female artists, to bring us a special remix of one of the year’s most iconic songs.

Bad Bunny teamed up with two female artists to give us the remix to “Yo Perreo Sola” we’ve always wanted.

Last night at the 2020 Billboard Music Awards in Los Angeles, Bad Bunny gave his fans the ultimate gift – a special remix of one of his most iconic songs. And it wasn’t just any ol’ remix. San Benito brought out two special reggaetóneras to sing alongside him and it was everything.

El Conejo Malo performed his hit song, “Yo Perreo Sola,” but before he even took the stage, none other than the reggaeton queen herself, Ivy Queen, kicked off the performance. Wearing a full bedazzled black-and-silver bodysuit, Ivy began dancing along to the song before taking off her mask and unveiling herself. She sang the first verses before Bad Bunny made his entrance. The twosome were also joined by Puerto Rican rapper Nesi, who is originally featured on the single.

Ivy has said in the past that today’s reggaetón artists seem to be shunning the stars and artists of the past – not paying respect where respect is due. In fact, Bad Bunny had come under fire for not featuring Nesi as a writer on the single when it was first released. So, it was nice to see Bad Bunny share the spotlight with the OG reggaetónera and the voice that helped make the song the success it’s become.

The remix is a total bop and couldn’t have come at a better time.

I’m not gonna lie. I didn’t know if “Yo Perreo Sola” could actually get any better. From the lyrics and message to the video, it’s the total package.

But this remix really takes the track to the next level!

Our reina – Ivy Queen – arguably stole the show last night with her performance.

Credit: Kevin Mazur / Getty Images

Everything about last night’s award ceremony was fine. Obviously, not having a live audience makes things difficult for the performers. And that was obvious to viewers until Ivy Queen took the stage.

When the OG Queen emerged onstage in a structured superhero fit in a style I’d like to label “robotic diamonds,” she came complete with exaggerated hips and shoulders. She looked incredible. Show-stopping good. Like, unnecessarily good. So good, in fact, that everyone else looked bad. For a show without an audience, she went well above and beyond.

And we stand hard Ivy Queen, she’s repeatedly shown just how incredible she is.

How many of us feel like we have special connections with a certain singer or artist or actor? The type of connection that makes you basically tear up the moment you think about them or a song that has a special meaning for you?

For so many of us, the chance to meet one of our icons is everything. Well, Ivy Queen makes people’s dreams come true. She has special connections with so many of her fans and she makes herself accessible.

Many of her fans have said they see her as a mother figure for her acceptance and warm embrace.

Bad Bunny was also awarded Top Latin Artist – an award that many say he deserves.

Right after the stunning performance – I’m still gooped! – Bad Bunny was awarded Top Latin Artist.

“What a time to be Latino. We got the power. So proud, thank you to Billboards, thank you to all my fans around the world,” he said before dedicating his award to all the women in the world, especially Latinas.

“Without you nothing would exist,” he continued in Spanish. “Enough violence against women. Let’s educate everyone now for a better future.”He added that everyone should understand that you can have fun and be respectful at the same time. “Si ella no quiere bailar contigo, respeta. Ella perrea sola.”

And excitement is not over for San Benito just yet. Next week at the Billboard Latin Music Awards, Bad Bunny is up for 14 nominations and next month we’ll see if he wins any of his nine Latin Grammy nods.

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Bad Bunny Talks New Music And His Future In Reggaetón In A Powerful New Interview

Entertainment

Bad Bunny Talks New Music And His Future In Reggaetón In A Powerful New Interview

Kevin Mazur / Getty Images

So much of this year has been spent inside our apartments singing and dancing to Bad Bunny hits like “Safaera” and “Yo Perreo Sola” or looking through countless magazines that made him their cover boy.

It seems that 2020 is peak Bad Bunny, as the reggaetónero takes over the world bringing us hit after hit while bringing perreo into the mainstream.

Now, in his latest cover story in The Culture Issue of the New York Times, San Benito gives us insight into what his 2020 has been like, what we can expect from him in the not so distant future and what being a Puerto Rican super star means to him.

Bad Bunny is taking over the world and his latest interview with the New York Times details just how he plans to do it.

‘The World According to Bad Bunny’ – that is what graces the cover of the New York Times’ latest Culture Issue. And it catches your eye – his full face, including his now signature mustache – force you to do a double take to soak in all of his glory. Or maybe that was just my reaction…

Benito Antonio Martínez Ocasio — more popularly known as Bad Bunny, San Benito, El Conejo Malo — is the reggaetónero we’ve all fallen in love with and who is topping charts throughout the world. 

His latest feature story covers everything from his love for Puerto Rico to his next album, but it’s also another major step for the artist in putting both is home and the Latino community on the world stage.

His profile begins with Bad Bunny discussing his album YHLQMDLG, which begins with the song “Si Veo a Tu Mamá”, which has a verse we can all relate to in 2020: “maldito Año Nuevo” (or “this damn new year”). But despite all the BS that 2020 has thrown our way, Bad Bunny has managed to shine through by being an advocate when it comes to so many issues.

Bad Bunny says he feels like an “athlete representing his Puerto Rico at the Olympics.“

San Benito has made it his mission to put his homeland on the map and to showcase to the world the problems that Boricuas face on the island. In the interview, Bad Bunny describes himself as an athlete representing Puerto Rico in the Olympics.

Those problems he speaks of include the island’s status as a commonwealth territory of the U.S. which means its citizens on the island cannot vote for president or have any voting representatives in Congress. 

The natural disasters of Hurricane Maria, Irma and the earthquakes that rung in 2020 also add to the laundry list of problems, and also came with little financial help from Trump’s federal government, which has left Puerto Rico in a vulnerable state to this day.

In language, Caribbean Spanish like that of Puerto Rico is heavily criticized by the so-called sophisticated Latin Americans, but they all bop their heads to Bad Bunny tunes like “Safaera,” “La Romana,” and more.

So many of us love Bad Bunny for his constant activism and he doesn’t disappoint in this NYT piece.

Bad Bunny is known for breaking cultural stereotypes, shattering boundaries others couldn’t dream of, and advocating for women. He’s even openly talked about depression, and shown the world it is okay not to feel okay.

His activism has also shown support for the trans community with the video “Yo Perreo Sola,” dressed in drag, or when he’s done public appearances wearing a skirt and a shirt that read “mataron a alexa, no a un hombre en falda.”

However, in the wake of George Floyd’s murder, Benito was suspiciously mute — no posts on social media, no interviews. He seemed to have disappeared at a moment that so many of us could of benefited from his compassion. Many criticized the singer for his silence.

But on June 12, a TIME article was published about him speaking out, through email exchanges, and how he did not want to just send a basic message, but rather go deeper to “support the fight against a systematic monster that’s been [around for] centuries.”

Bad Bunny also speaks out about reggaetón’s black roots – which so often go unmentioned.

Credit: Kevin Mazur / Getty Images

As for inspirations, Benito called out the prominent Black stars who helped shape reggaetón into the phenomenon that is it today. He admits that’s something he’s still learning about. “As a child, for better or worse, I always lived in my bubble,” Benito says. “Now, I could say – and people do say – it’s a form of privilege. But it’s always been my way of being. Me, in my house and in my bubble, imagining a better, more magical world.”

As he ascends into the pop mainstream, Bad Bunny also opens up about returning reggaetón to its Puerto Rican roots on his album YHLQMDLG. “Since reggaetón went pop all over the world, I don’t feel like people really know the sound that raised me, that I grew up studying,” he says. “This is the album I would’ve wanted to release when I was 15 and dreamed of being a singer.” Benito also hints to the next project, adding, “My next album doesn’t have anything to do with YHLQMDLG.”

It’s a long interview but, come on, it’s with Bad Bunny so the entire interview is worth the read. You can check out the NYT piece here.

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