Entertainment

Nurses Are Keeping Hospitals Running And Patients Safe And They Deserve All The Praise

Indya Moore is like the rest of us. They are in self-isolation because of lockdown measures across the globe. Like millions of people living in the U.S., Moore is personally connected to the COVID-19 crisis because they have family members who are on the frontlines fighting this virus in the hospitals.

Indya Moore wants all essential workers to feel the love during this health crisis.

Health care workers, nursing home staff, grocery store workers, police officers, truck drivers, and so many other people are still working day-to-day to keep society moving. These people are willingly putting themselves in the line of fire to fulfill their duties.

When it comes to nursing, women make up 88 percent of the U.S. nursing workforce. In New York City, Asian, Black, and Latino people make up 70 percent of the essential worker population ranging from transportation to health care workers, according to Buzzfeed News. New York is currently the location of the largest and deadliest outbreak in the world.

For some people, the post is speaking directly to their experience and families.

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Millions of Americans are continuing to go to work to make sure that people can have the food and essential services they need. For some, they have had to fight to get the necessary health precautions from their employers. Workers at Target, Whole Foods, Amazon, Walmart, and more retailers coordinated a major sickout protest to demand changes to their working conditions to make it safer.

Health care workers in New York City are at a much higher risk of contracting the virus than their counterparts around the world.

New York City has reported more than 177,000 cases of COVID-19, more than most countries. NYC has a population of about 8.4 million meaning that 1 in every 47 people have tested positive for COVID-19. At its peak, 573 people died in one day because of COVID-19 in New York City. Currently, there have been more than 13,000 deaths of COVID-19 reported by New York State.

In several cities around the world, people have started nightly celebrations of health care workers.

Los Angeles residents celebrate the health care workers at 8 p.m. PST daily. New York, Vancouver, and other cities have started their own daily health care worker celebrations. It is a daily reminder that those staying home are doing so to fight the virus and show appreciation for the people fighting the battle.

The message of love and care for essential workers is something American families are becoming familiar with.

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Millions of Americans are out working to keep things afloat. Whether it is the grocery store worker stocking shelves or the nurse making sure that patients get their medicine on time, these workers are risking their lives to help us. They have helped us maintain a basic sense of normalcy while the rest of the world grappled with a pandemic.

Thank you to all of the frontline and essential workers doing everything they can to keep us moving forward.

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If you know an essential worker, take some time to thank them today and every day. They are doing the work so many people can’t or would refuse to do. More than 1 million Americans have contracted COVID-19 and new estimates project that more than 130,000 Americans will die from the virus. The doubling in the projected death rate comes as some states in the southeast have rushed to reopen ignoring guidelines set forth by the U.S. government and global health experts.

As always, familia. Stay safe. Stay home. Practice social distancing. We are in this together.

READ: A Young Mother With COVID-19 In Chicago Dies After Emergency C-Section

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Thank You To All Of The Essential And Frontline Workers That Guided Us Through Covid This Year

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Thank You To All Of The Essential And Frontline Workers That Guided Us Through Covid This Year

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This has been a tough year for just about everyone. Covid-19 spread across the world forcing governments and businesses to shut down. Billions of people were forced to quarantine to stop the spread of the new virus that was infecting and killing millions. Yet, despite the ongoing pandemic, some people worked to keep the world moving forward.

Frontline and essential workers maintained the essential parts of society that keep life moving forward. They kept the grocery stores stocked and managed so we could eat. They filled prescriptions to make sure that no one had to go without their medication. They kept hospitals clean so nurses and doctors could do the work of saving lives from an unknown virus that was spreading through the country.

As the world hid, a brave few worked daily to keep us in our comforts and we owe them an immense debt of gratitude.

Thank you. From the bottom of our hearts, thank you for putting yourself in harm’s way so we could survive. History will back at this time and remember the millions of people who we could not live without. They did what so many of us could not.

There was a palpable fear in the air in mid-March. Cases of an unknown virus were appearing everywhere in the world. Community spread was recorded as the virus arrived in new countries. It crossed borders with ease because of how connected the world is at this time. Borders were closed. Cities, states, and countries announced lockdown orders shuttering non-essential businesses to protect lives.

We were scared.

From that fear emerged the frontline and essential workers. Society had a chance to see the people that we need and who support us. Grocery store workers, farmworkers, pharmacists, nurses, and so many other people became our first line of defense. They braved the virus to protect us.

Thank you for everything you have done and continue to do. You are the reason we are anywhere near the other side of this pandemic. Your tireless work to maintain the flow of food, medicine, and paper products saved lives.

In thanks, mitú stands with the essential and frontline workers in urging our readers not to travel or gather this holiday season. After months of working non-stop during this pandemic, essential and frontline workers need us to stay home. They need us to do what we can to slow the spread during this second wave. By staying home, you keep them safe from potential exposures as cases continue to climb in the U.S.

We can make a big difference if we follow guidelines. We must keep practicing social distancing, wearing our masks, and listening to health care experts. Do it for the essential worker in your life. Do it for the real life heroes who continue to work as the pandemic rages on.

READ: 28-Year-Old Nurse Dies From COVID-19 Hours After Filming a Heartbreaking Video For His Family

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A Latina Nurse Named Helen Cordova Was the First Person to Get a COVID-19 Vaccine in California

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A Latina Nurse Named Helen Cordova Was the First Person to Get a COVID-19 Vaccine in California

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On Monday, the first person in California was administered the COVID-19 vaccine and her name was Helen Cordova. Cordova is an intensive care nurse at the Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center. She is also a brave woman who deserves to be celebrated for her courage.

The doctors, nurses and elected officials (including California Governor Gavin Newson) applauded after Cordova received the vaccine.

“I’m very excited that we have the vaccine, because it provides hope for the future,” Cordova said afterward, according to The Los Angeles Times.

But after she got the vaccine, Cordova went back to work–business as usual. Four other healthcare workers received the vaccine after her, including a respiratory therapy technician named Raul Aguilar.

It is significant that the first Californian to receive the vaccine was Latina, as Latinos have been disproportionately impacted by the coronavirus.

Latinos make up 39% of California’s population and 40% of frontline workers in California. 58% of the California COVID-19 cases and 48% of COVID-19 related deaths have been from Latinos. The L.A. County Department of Public Health reports that California Latinos are more than twice as likely as white Californians to contract the virus.

To make matters worse, Latinos are more likely to be suspicious of the coronavirus vaccine. “In communities of color in particular, there is a real history of abuse by the medical system that creates a potentially higher level of skepticism,” said Dr. Robert Wachter chair of the Department of Medicine at UC San Francisco to the LA Times.

Hopefully, patients like Helen Cordova will inspire confidence in the Latino community that the vaccine is, indeed, both safe and effective.

Shortly after Cordova received the vaccine, Governor Newsome tweeted out: “History made.”

But earlier in the day at Kaiser Permanente, Governor Newsome was slightly more somber, as California (like every other state) is facing its most grim stretch of the pandemic so far. In the last week, the Golden State averaged 32,858 new COVID-19 cases a day.

“We are in the midst of the worst moment of this pandemic,” he said. “So today is hopeful, and it’s reason to be optimistic, but let’s be mindful of where we really are.”

Three other California cities received shipments of the COVID-19 vaccine on Monday, including San Diego, San Francisco and Eureka. According to reports, the vaccine will become available to the general public in the spring.

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