Entertainment

Nurses Are Keeping Hospitals Running And Patients Safe And They Deserve All The Praise

Indya Moore is like the rest of us. They are in self-isolation because of lockdown measures across the globe. Like millions of people living in the U.S., Moore is personally connected to the COVID-19 crisis because they have family members who are on the frontlines fighting this virus in the hospitals.

Indya Moore wants all essential workers to feel the love during this health crisis.

Health care workers, nursing home staff, grocery store workers, police officers, truck drivers, and so many other people are still working day-to-day to keep society moving. These people are willingly putting themselves in the line of fire to fulfill their duties.

When it comes to nursing, women make up 88 percent of the U.S. nursing workforce. In New York City, Asian, Black, and Latino people make up 70 percent of the essential worker population ranging from transportation to health care workers, according to Buzzfeed News. New York is currently the location of the largest and deadliest outbreak in the world.

For some people, the post is speaking directly to their experience and families.

Credit: giraso1_ / Instagram

Millions of Americans are continuing to go to work to make sure that people can have the food and essential services they need. For some, they have had to fight to get the necessary health precautions from their employers. Workers at Target, Whole Foods, Amazon, Walmart, and more retailers coordinated a major sickout protest to demand changes to their working conditions to make it safer.

Health care workers in New York City are at a much higher risk of contracting the virus than their counterparts around the world.

New York City has reported more than 177,000 cases of COVID-19, more than most countries. NYC has a population of about 8.4 million meaning that 1 in every 47 people have tested positive for COVID-19. At its peak, 573 people died in one day because of COVID-19 in New York City. Currently, there have been more than 13,000 deaths of COVID-19 reported by New York State.

In several cities around the world, people have started nightly celebrations of health care workers.

Los Angeles residents celebrate the health care workers at 8 p.m. PST daily. New York, Vancouver, and other cities have started their own daily health care worker celebrations. It is a daily reminder that those staying home are doing so to fight the virus and show appreciation for the people fighting the battle.

The message of love and care for essential workers is something American families are becoming familiar with.

Credit: marialissa11 / Instagram

Millions of Americans are out working to keep things afloat. Whether it is the grocery store worker stocking shelves or the nurse making sure that patients get their medicine on time, these workers are risking their lives to help us. They have helped us maintain a basic sense of normalcy while the rest of the world grappled with a pandemic.

Thank you to all of the frontline and essential workers doing everything they can to keep us moving forward.

Credit: naina1453 / Instagram

If you know an essential worker, take some time to thank them today and every day. They are doing the work so many people can’t or would refuse to do. More than 1 million Americans have contracted COVID-19 and new estimates project that more than 130,000 Americans will die from the virus. The doubling in the projected death rate comes as some states in the southeast have rushed to reopen ignoring guidelines set forth by the U.S. government and global health experts.

As always, familia. Stay safe. Stay home. Practice social distancing. We are in this together.

READ: A Young Mother With COVID-19 In Chicago Dies After Emergency C-Section

Latinos Make Up A Large Portion Of ‘Essential Workers’ And This Latino Comic Book Is Honoring Them In The Best Way Possible

Culture

Latinos Make Up A Large Portion Of ‘Essential Workers’ And This Latino Comic Book Is Honoring Them In The Best Way Possible

El Paso Hero / Rio Bravo Comics

If the Coronavirus pandemic has shown us anything, it’s that real-life heroes can be found all over. During the global crisis, regular people have realized that everyone from a fast food restaurant worker to a farmworker is a hero in their own way. It’s these people, many of whom are minorities, who have helped keep the country going during these unprecedented times. To so many of us, these front-line ‘essential workers’ are indeed heroes.

One Mexican-American comic book creator, Hector Rodriguez (of El Peso Hero) decided to put these real-life superheroes on the pages of his popular comic book and we couldn’t be more excited.

The best-selling comic book now features America’s front-line workers as the real heroes who are keeping the country running.

Credit: El Peso Hero / Rio Bravo Comics

Comic books are known for telling larger than life stories and inspiring their audiences – and that’s exactly what El Peso Hero is doing with his latest edition. Rodriguez is using El Peso Hero to tell the story of thousands of invisible workers – many of whom are undocumented Latino workers holding America together.

“Comic books are a great way to help people connect,” Rodríguez told NBC News. “But very few stories focus on the people who are feeding us.”

In this special pandemic issue, which is available for free, “El Peso Hero” takes a supporting role to a nurse and other essential workers facing tough day-to-day challenges as the country struggles to combat Covid-19.

In his interview with NBC News, Rodriguez said he hopes his comic can inspire Americans to reimagine themselves in the stories of millions of invisible workers who serve their communities.

It’s more important than ever to shine a light on the often invisible workers who are so vital to this country.

Credit: Salud America / Twitter

For Rodriguez, he hopes this edition will help shed light on the hard work and dedication of millions of invisible workers. People from all backgrounds can find common ground with these front-line workers who like so many Americans are simply trying to create a better life for themselves and their families.

“This is definitely a contrast from “El Peso Hero” fighting corruption, drug cartels, and racism on the border,” Rodríguez said. “Fans will see him in a supporting role to real-life heroes, helping a nurse bring medical masks to agricultural workers, and deliver a much needed message of solidarity and positivity to a community that is often marginalized in the shadows.”

Rodríguez himself comes from a family of immigrants — his grandfather moved from Mexico to Montana in the 1940s as a part of the Bracero Program, which brought in millions of authorized workers from Mexico to the U.S. to work on farms.

What inspired the El Peso Hero comic book series to begin with?

Credit: Rio Bravo Comics

El Peso Hero is a rogue hero standing up to Mexico’s cartels, corrupt border officials, and human traffickers.

Rodriguez told NBC News, “I wanted to create someone like Luke Cage in Harlem, but living in between southwest Texas and north Mexico, who fights cartels, and defends unaccompanied minors and families crossing the perilous border.”

It was stories his grandfather told about drug traffickers attacking vulnerable immigrants on the border that inspired him to create “El Peso Hero.”

“El Peso Hero” started off as a web comic in 2011, and is now scheduled to make its movie screen debut in 2021. The comic gained cross-border fame in 2015 after the Mexican superhero took on then presidential candidate Donald Trump — who started his campaign by saying Mexicans coming to the U.S. were rapists and criminals

This edition of El Peso Hero is so important and special given the bravery and selflessness of front-line workers.

Credit: Tom Barton / Getty

Across the country, millions of Latino workers, many of whom are undocumented, are working on farms, in meat packing plants and govern stores as “essential workers,” while much of the country is shut down for quarantine. Unlike many workers, they don’t have the privilege to work from home and instead are putting themselves and their families at risk to keep the country going.

Historically they are marginalized as outsiders and live in constant fear of deportation. But now the pandemic is showing how vital they really are to society.

The U.S. government calculates that roughly half of all crop farmworkers—1.18 million in 2019—are undocumented. A recent article from The New York Times reports that growers and labor contractors think it could be closer to 75 percent.

A Rail Worker Died Of The Coronavirus After A Man Who Said He Had COVID-19 Spat On Her

Entertainment

A Rail Worker Died Of The Coronavirus After A Man Who Said He Had COVID-19 Spat On Her

@bakerloormt / Twitter

A police investigation has been launched by the British Transport Police after a railway ticket office worker died from Covid-19.  According to reports, the 47-year-old woman named Belly Mujinga had been on duty when a man purposefully spat and coughed on her. He also told the women that he had the virus which has caused a worldwide pandemic and thousands of deaths.

Mujinga had an underlying health condition and was working for Govia Thameslink Railway on the station concourse when the attack took place.

The incident happened on March 22 and included another working colleague of Mujinga’s. Overall, the attack highlights an especially disturbing problem in the UK, which involves COVID-19 and race. According to CNN, Black people in the UK four times more likely to die from Covid-19 than white people, new data shows.

“Belly and her colleague begged to be let to work from inside the building with a protective barrier between them and the public for the rest of that day,” Transport Salaried Staffs Association (TSSA) said in its statement. “Management said they needed people working outside and sent them back out onto the concourse for the rest of their shift.”

When both of the women returned to their shift, they do so without any personal protective equipment.

In a statement about Mujinga’s death, the TSSA said the GTR was aware of her condition and accused the train system of only allowing Mujinga to leave when her physician called her employers around March 25.

“As a vulnerable person in the ‘at risk’ category and her condition known to her employer, there are questions about why GTR didn’t stand her down from front line duties early on in this pandemic,” Manuel Cortes, TSSA general secretary said in an accusatory statement on behalf of the TSSA. “There are serious questions about her death, it wasn’t inevitable.”

Mujinga’s death has highlighted the roles deemed as “essential” during current times, putting into question their need to be put into operation.

It’s imperative, now more than ever, that governments and ruling bodies put protections in place for all people. Particularly those deemed essential.