Entertainment

Emmy Nominations Snub Latino Actors Again Despite Great Roles This Year

Once again, the Emmy nominations have overlooked the Latino roles that made the years memorable. From Rita Moreno to Mj Rodriguez, there were roles the covered a lot of Latino culture, and yet there was no mention from the Emmys.

The Emmy nominations are out and it is another slap in the face to the Latino community.

Latino representation in Hollywood has been a major issue for decades. Recently, there has been more and more pressure to equalize the representation of media to better reflect society. However, the Emmys still don’t get it. Instead, the only Latino recognized by the Emmys is Alexis Bledel as a Guest Actress in a Drama for “A Handmaid’s Tale.”

However, the J.Lo/Shakira halftime show was nominated for four awards.

The halftime show made history with at least 1,300 calls to the FCC complaining of the perceived overly sexualized nature of the show. Now, the performance is nominated for outstanding variety special (live), outstanding directing for a variety special, outstanding lighting design/direction for a variety special and outstanding music direction.

Yet, in the time of “One Day at a Time,” “Vida,” “Gentefied,” and “Pose” how did this happen?

There are so many shows highlighting the evergrowing representation of the complete Latino experience. There are obviously so much more to cover and bring to light, yet with the massive successes of the Latino-led shows right now, many are disappointed in the Emmys clear lack of representation.

“But not Rita Moreno, who has been killing it on One Day at a Time for four seasons. Not Laura Gómez, whose performance in Orange Is the New Black’s excellent final season was alternatively haunting and inspiring — and as timely as it gets,” Laura Bradley wrote for the Daily Beast about Bledel being the lone Latino acting nomination. “Not Melissa Barrera or Mishel Prada of Vida, a series that pushed past stereotypical Latinx stories to discuss deeper, more nuanced issues that pervade our community before it was canceled too soon.”

It is a frustrating reminder to the Latino community that so much work still needs to be done.

Latinos today have shows that they can point to as showing their experience. We have characters and actors we cling to because of their representation. The shows are also successful. “One Day at a Time,” for example, was removed for Netflix and a global effort started to save the show. Twitter was buzzing with people across the globe trying to get Netflix to reverse course on the sudden and devastating cancelation. Fortunately, Pop TV come through and saved the beloved show to keep bring us stories from the Alvarez family.

The Latino community deserves better and we need to keep making noise.

Latinos are a diverse and growing community in the U.S. We have stories that still need to be told and we have stories that are being told. They are being told with authenticity and passion. The lack of Latino representation at the Emmys is something that we are all very aware of. It is necessary to make sure that we all have a seat at the table.

Basically, it is time for the Emmys to do better.

Latino roles are out there and thriving. It is long past time for them to get the recognition they deserve.

READ: Indya Moore Told Reporters On The Red Carpet That They Do Not Identify As Latina And Here’s Why

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This Mexican Filmmaker’s Six-Pack Inspired The Oscar Statue

Entertainment

This Mexican Filmmaker’s Six-Pack Inspired The Oscar Statue

The Soldiers of Pancho Villa / Películas Rodríguez

That’s right, Oscar’s real name is actually Emilio.

When it comes to the Academy Awards, there’s nothing more iconic than the actual Oscar award. That’s right, it’s not Björk’s swan dress or Jennifer Lopez’s beloved pink gown, when people think of the Oscar Awards it’s always the rip-chested statue with broad shoulders and muscled legs. The art deco god that everyone in entertainment dreams of one-day holding: the Oscar award.

But, as familiar as he may be, it turns out we don’t know Oscar very well.

Emilio Fernandez, born in Coahuila, Mexico, became the face of the Academy Awards thanks to a close friend.

Fernandez grew up during the Mexican Revolution and according to PRI, later left high school to become an officer for the Huertista rebels. In 1925, he was captured and sentenced to 20 years in prison but managed to escape his sentence and fled to Los Angeles.

Soon enough he began working as an extra in Hollywood and picked up the nickname “El Indio” when he met Dolores Del Rio, the silent film actress and wife of MGM Art Director Cedric Gibbons. the nickname was terrible but Del Rio and Fernandez became friends and when her husband was given an opportunity to design the award statuette fate happened.

Del Rio suggested Fernandez as a model for the statue and her husband agreed.

Fernandez’s life became much greater than a statue though, he became one of the biggest stars of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema. He worked in numerous film productions in Mexico and in Hollywood starring in the 1944 film María Candelaria, the 1947 film Río Escondido and Vìctimas del Pecado made in 1951.

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‘One Day At a Time’ Has Been Canceled (Again)

Entertainment

‘One Day At a Time’ Has Been Canceled (Again)

Photo by Robby Klein/Getty Images

Fan-favorite sitcom “One Day At a Time” has, once again, been canceled. The rebooted show that centered on a Cuban-American family in Los Angeles originally streamed on Netflix and then moved to the Pop network after Netflix pulled the plug in 2019.

But now, Pop has also decided not to renew the series, disappointing fans everywhere.

Like the first time the show was cancelled, viewers took to social media to grieve. “You know how there are only some jokes that only your Latino friends get?,” wrote one Twitter user. “ODAAT was that one show where we got that humor. Like those conversations with each other where we open up about things we can’t even tell our parents. Mental health, identity, etc. It’s so important.”

Just recently, the show’s producers talked about their plans for the upcoming season. “We have so much more to tell, and especially with everything that’s going on in this world, every day, I’m like, oh my gosh, Elena would say this. Elena would say that. Elena would say this. It’s just ripe with things that this family would be talking about,” producer Gloria Calderon Kellett told Deadline. “This family, we have so much for them to go through still.”

Like in the aftermath of the last cancellation, the cast of the series took to social media to kickstart a campaign to keep the show on the air.

“I can and have written essays on how much this show means to me, but it boils down to #RepresentationMatters and man does ODAAT do that for so many, myself included,” Tweeted actress Isabella Gomez, who played rebellious teen Elena Alvarez on the show. “Maybe we can make magic happen again? Tell us why you want the Alvarez family back with #SaveODAAT”.

Back when ODAAT was canceled by Netflix in 2019, the show fans as well as its fans rallied together to make #SaveODAAT trend. Shortly after the hashtag went viral, the show was picked up by Pop. But Pop was acquired by a different company and it seems like ODAAT has become collateral damage in the merger.

Justina Machado also posted her reaction to the news on Instagram.

Machado expressed her sadness at the turn of events, but also remains hopeful that the show will find a third life somewhere else.

“Sadly, the news is out,” she wrote on Instagram. “And we weren’t so much canceled as we were a byproduct of a business model changing at the channel that bought us.”

“I’m not sad just yet, y’all,” she continued. “We still have some hope for new homes. Hang tight, my loves. You know that if I go down, I will go down swinging for this show (& cast & crew) I love.”

Crossing our fingers that this important show finds the permanent home that it deserves.

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