Entertainment

Indya Moore Told Reporters On The Red Carpet That They Do Not Identify As Latina And Here’s Why

Indya Moore, who uses the pronouns they/them, was on Emmys purple carpet when they were asked about a comment they made previously. The comment was about Latinidad and how they don’t identify with that community. Here is why Moore says they are not Latina but Afro-Taíno.

“Pose” star Indya Moore has no time for the colonized identity of Latino.

Credit: @REMEZCLA / Twitter

Moore first spoke about their identity during a discussion at the Sundance Film Festival. Moore spoke with Buzzfeed’s Curly Velasquez as part of the Up Next Series Brunch and got candid about their identity on a racial and cultural level.

“I don’t understand why we have to be identified as ‘Latin’ or ‘Hispanic’ when most of us are not from Spain,” Moore said at the brunch. “Our language, the ways we identify with ourselves have been given to us.”

Moore further clarified their comment during the Emmys purple carpet.

Credit: @jota_sexteam / Twitter

Moore was at the award show last night with their co-stars of “Pose,” which was nominated for an award. Their biggest moment came when Remezcla asked the star to clarify their remarks about not identifying as Latino.

“A lot of the culture was lost through imperialism and there’s still so much distance and disconnect with me,” Moore added at the Sundance brunch. “I did learn a lot about my gender variance, it was acknowledged through my ancestry. Something that was very important to me: that my ancestors loved me. And that I am my ancestors’ dreams.”

Their comments about their cultural heritage has angered at least one Twitter user.

Credit: @GirlGoneTravel / Twitter

The conversations about anti-blackness in the Latino community have intensified in recent years. Afro-Latinos are rightfully demanding their place at the table to demand representation within their community.

However, Moore’s comments speak to another sentiment within the Latino community, one of decolonizing our identities. From cookbooks to social media discussions, Latino people are searching for answers about their identity that does not tie back to the Spanish colonization and European oppression that led to our current understanding of our identity.

Moore was unapologetic at the Emmys about their complete identity.

“Black Latinos don’t necessarily have the same experience as Latinos who are not Black,” Moore told Remezcla. “I, personally, do not identify as Latino because Latino means Latin and Latin, it means white. And I’m not white, so I just call myself Afro-Taíno ’cause that’s what I am.”

The Taíno people are an indigenous population that lived in the Caribbean islands of Cuba, Hispaniola (the Dominican Republic and Haiti), Jamaica, Puerto Rico, the Bahamas, and the Lesser Antilles. They were the first group of First World people to encounter European colonizers in 1492 with the arrival of Christopher Columbus.

Like other indigenous groups, European colonizers set about killing off indigenous communities to steal land and inject European ideals and culture in their place. This is the kind of history people are having to find for themselves since it is not taught in class. Labels like Latino, Hispanic, and Latin America have long been contentious because of their clear reference to the violent and forced colonization of indigenous people in the Americas.

Moore not only took on the blanket identity of Latino, but they also took on the beauty standards of female-presenting people.

Credit: @IndyaMoore / Twitter

Moore walked the purple carpet in a stunning dress that showed off their long and beautiful legs. However, some people are thrown by the appearance of leg hair on the star. When someone asked if there was hair on their leg, they responded with power.

“I grow hair on my legs. And I choose not to shave it cus I like it,” Morre tweeted back. “There are bigger issues being debated about my life in the supreme Court right now anyways. But yes, I have hair on my legs, and under my under arms too and in my ass. Have fun.”

Moore was referring to the Title VII case heading to the Supreme Court on Oct. 8.

Solicitor General Noel Francisco filed a brief with the Supreme Court telling the justices that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act does not protect transgender people. Laverne Cox brought attention to the coming case at the Supreme Court by bringing ACLU attorney Chase Strangio who spoke about the case on the purple carpet.

“Everyone should be aware that the administration is asking the Supreme Court to make it legal to fire workers just because they’re LGBTQ and this is actually going to transform the lives of LGBTQ people and people who are not LGBTQ,” Strangio said on the purple carpet. “Anyone who departs from sex stereotypes like all the fabulous people here for example so we really need to show up October 8 and pay attention because our lives are really on the line.”

READ: Indya Moore Is The First Trans Person To Grace An Elle Magazine Cover And Her Red Carpet Looks Prove Why

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Netflix’s Newest Musical Teen Hit Series Stars a 16-Year-Old Afro-Latina Newcomer

Entertainment

Netflix’s Newest Musical Teen Hit Series Stars a 16-Year-Old Afro-Latina Newcomer

A new teen series has dropped on Netflix that the internet can’t stop talking about. The newest cultural phenomenon that has hit the juggernaut streaming service is a musical series called Julie and the Phantoms, based on the 2011 Brazilian show of the same name.

The series follows a 16-year-old insecure girl named Julie who has lost her love of music after the tragic death of her mother. But with the help of a (stay with us here) band of musical ghosts she stumbles across in her garage, she soon re-discovers her love of singing and performing. Backed by her band of “phantoms”, Julie confidently takes the stage again, blowing everyone away in the process. ,

But the wacky, heartfelt story-line isn’t the only reason people are excited about the show. The buzz around the show is building because its star, 16-year-old newcomer Madison Reyes, is an Afro-Latina singer-actress of Puerto Rican descent.

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Before landing the role of Julie, Reyes was just a regular shmegular Nuyorican girl going to high school in Brooklyn. Needless to say, the process of auditioning for Julie and the Phantoms was both a whirlwind and a game-changer.

“I found out about Julie and the Phantoms through my school. At first I was nervous to send my video in, but after talking to some friends, I sent it in and got a call back,” Reyes told Refinery 29. “From there it was just figuring out when I could fly to L.A. When I finally made it out there, the audition process lasted two days.”

Reyes, for one, understands the burden of her load. “[Julie] is Latin American, she’s got textured hair, she’s a strong and independent female character,” Reyes recently told the LA Times. “As a person of color who wants more diversity [on-screen], I’m kind of scared about the hate comments that I’ve seen other people have to go through, especially women.”

As if having an Afro-Latina actress at the center of a popular Netflix show wasn’t exciting enough, the series is also being helmed by Mexican-American director and all-around legend Kenny Ortega. For those of you unfamiliar with Ortega, he is the creative genius who directed bonafide classics like High School Musical and Hocus Pocus.

Ortega has been publicly effusive in his praise of Reyes. “She has this raw talent that can take on any genre of music, and this promise of greatness that excited everybody,” he told the LA Times. “And yet she’s so relatable and grounded.”

Fans are already calling for a second season after watching the cliffhanger season finale. Reyes, herself, can’t wait to get back in the shoes of Julie. When asked in an interview about where we’ll see her next, she responded: “Hopefully in the next season of Julie and the Phantoms!”. We second that wish.

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This Iñupiaq TikToker Has A Thing Or Two To Teach You About Celebrating Indigenous Cultures Online

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This Iñupiaq TikToker Has A Thing Or Two To Teach You About Celebrating Indigenous Cultures Online

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An Indigenous woman from Utqiagvik, Alaska who is part of the Iñupiaq tribe is TikTok’s latest culture sensation.

While the rest of us are stuck indoors and quarantining, Patuk Glenn has been amassing a following on Instagram and teaching her 81,000 followers about the Iñupiaq culture, traditions, and daily routines. From sharing videos about hunting to showing off her culture’s traditional clothing, Glenn’s videos are a reminder that beyond being alive, indigenous cultures around the globe are resilient– even in the face of our world’s constant attempts to change and eliminate them.

Glenn’s trending TikTok videos run the gamut from cooking to wearing her traditional clothing.

In some videos, Glenn shares the recipe for Inuit ice cream (caribou fat, ground caribou meat, and seal meat) or shares what her traditional clothing looks like. In one truly insightful clip, she takes her followers through a traditional ice cellar in her mother’s house. There, Glenn shared with her viewers that she and her family use the permafrost surround the cellar to preserve whale, seal, and caribou.

Given some of the food content, some of Glenn’s videos have received some backlash to which she isn’t batting much of an eye.

In videos where Glenn features food from whales (muktuk, or whale skin) she says that she has become used to receiving not so positive comments on occasion. Speaking to CBC News, Glenn explained that such comments are hurtful at times but mostly only inspire to continue to educate her followers more. “At first I was really upset,” she explained. “From there, with all of the negative backlash, I felt like it was my responsibility to help educate on why our Inuit people in the Arctic are hunters and gatherers.”

Glenn says that negative comments only push her to share more and educate her followers, particularly because she would like her daughter to be able to share her love for her culture one day as well. “We don’t want our kids to feel ashamed of who they are and where they came from. That’s what really hurt me the most.”

Impressively, Glenn says that learning on TikTok has become a two-way street too.

From TikTok, Glenn says that she has been able to learn and educate herself more about other Indigenous cultures as well. Glenn’s growing understanding of these groups and tribes (like Navajo and Cree) are a welcome surprise. Particularly for someone who, like the rest of us, is taught very little about the world’s Indigenous populations. “In the United States, we’re largely left out of the media. There’s no representation of us,” Glenn shared. “It’s 2020, we have a real opportunity in this day and age to be able to educate the world where institutional education has failed, or where mainstream media has failed.”

For Glenn, her fight to teach others more about her culture is vital. “This platform is helping give the power back into Indigenous people’s hands, to speak on behalf of themselves. I think that’s the really cool piece of it.”

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