Entertainment

Indya Moore Told Reporters On The Red Carpet That They Do Not Identify As Latina And Here’s Why

Indya Moore, who uses the pronouns they/them, was on Emmys purple carpet when they were asked about a comment they made previously. The comment was about Latinidad and how they don’t identify with that community. Here is why Moore says they are not Latina but Afro-Taíno.

“Pose” star Indya Moore has no time for the colonized identity of Latino.

Credit: @REMEZCLA / Twitter

Moore first spoke about their identity during a discussion at the Sundance Film Festival. Moore spoke with Buzzfeed’s Curly Velasquez as part of the Up Next Series Brunch and got candid about their identity on a racial and cultural level.

“I don’t understand why we have to be identified as ‘Latin’ or ‘Hispanic’ when most of us are not from Spain,” Moore said at the brunch. “Our language, the ways we identify with ourselves have been given to us.”

Moore further clarified their comment during the Emmys purple carpet.

Credit: @jota_sexteam / Twitter

Moore was at the award show last night with their co-stars of “Pose,” which was nominated for an award. Their biggest moment came when Remezcla asked the star to clarify their remarks about not identifying as Latino.

“A lot of the culture was lost through imperialism and there’s still so much distance and disconnect with me,” Moore added at the Sundance brunch. “I did learn a lot about my gender variance, it was acknowledged through my ancestry. Something that was very important to me: that my ancestors loved me. And that I am my ancestors’ dreams.”

Their comments about their cultural heritage has angered at least one Twitter user.

Credit: @GirlGoneTravel / Twitter

The conversations about anti-blackness in the Latino community have intensified in recent years. Afro-Latinos are rightfully demanding their place at the table to demand representation within their community.

However, Moore’s comments speak to another sentiment within the Latino community, one of decolonizing our identities. From cookbooks to social media discussions, Latino people are searching for answers about their identity that does not tie back to the Spanish colonization and European oppression that led to our current understanding of our identity.

Moore was unapologetic at the Emmys about their complete identity.

“Black Latinos don’t necessarily have the same experience as Latinos who are not Black,” Moore told Remezcla. “I, personally, do not identify as Latino because Latino means Latin and Latin, it means white. And I’m not white, so I just call myself Afro-Taíno ’cause that’s what I am.”

The Taíno people are an indigenous population that lived in the Caribbean islands of Cuba, Hispaniola (the Dominican Republic and Haiti), Jamaica, Puerto Rico, the Bahamas, and the Lesser Antilles. They were the first group of First World people to encounter European colonizers in 1492 with the arrival of Christopher Columbus.

Like other indigenous groups, European colonizers set about killing off indigenous communities to steal land and inject European ideals and culture in their place. This is the kind of history people are having to find for themselves since it is not taught in class. Labels like Latino, Hispanic, and Latin America have long been contentious because of their clear reference to the violent and forced colonization of indigenous people in the Americas.

Moore not only took on the blanket identity of Latino, but they also took on the beauty standards of female-presenting people.

Credit: @IndyaMoore / Twitter

Moore walked the purple carpet in a stunning dress that showed off their long and beautiful legs. However, some people are thrown by the appearance of leg hair on the star. When someone asked if there was hair on their leg, they responded with power.

“I grow hair on my legs. And I choose not to shave it cus I like it,” Morre tweeted back. “There are bigger issues being debated about my life in the supreme Court right now anyways. But yes, I have hair on my legs, and under my under arms too and in my ass. Have fun.”

Moore was referring to the Title VII case heading to the Supreme Court on Oct. 8.

Solicitor General Noel Francisco filed a brief with the Supreme Court telling the justices that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act does not protect transgender people. Laverne Cox brought attention to the coming case at the Supreme Court by bringing ACLU attorney Chase Strangio who spoke about the case on the purple carpet.

“Everyone should be aware that the administration is asking the Supreme Court to make it legal to fire workers just because they’re LGBTQ and this is actually going to transform the lives of LGBTQ people and people who are not LGBTQ,” Strangio said on the purple carpet. “Anyone who departs from sex stereotypes like all the fabulous people here for example so we really need to show up October 8 and pay attention because our lives are really on the line.”

READ: Indya Moore Is The First Trans Person To Grace An Elle Magazine Cover And Her Red Carpet Looks Prove Why

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Indigenous Purépecha Woman Gets Full Ride Scholarship To Attend Harvard

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Indigenous Purépecha Woman Gets Full Ride Scholarship To Attend Harvard

In just a few months, college freshmen will be descending on their campuses across the country. One of these students is Elizabeth Esteban who is the first person from her indigenous tribe in Mexico to be accepted to an Ivy League school.

Elizabeth Esteban is going to Harvard and it is a major deal.

Esteban is a member of the Purépecha tribe, an indigenous community from Michoacán, Mexico. Esteban is the first member of her tribe to be accepted into an Ivy League university, where indigenous representation remains small. Esteban’s parents work as farm laborers in the eastern Coachella Valley in California.

“Well I felt proud and excited, every sort of emotion because I never would have believed that a person like me, would be accepted to a prestigious university,” Esteban told NBC News.

Not only was Esteban accepted into Harvard, a prestigious university, she also received a full-ride scholarship. Esteban’s family is part of a community of hundreds of Purépecha people who relocated to the easter Coachella Valley in search of work and a better life.

Esteban plans to study political science.

Dr. Ruiz Speaks with State of the Union Guest, Elizabeth from Desert Mirage High School.

Join me for a live conversation with my guest for tonight's State of the Union, Elizabeth from Desert Mirage High School!

Posted by Congressman Raul Ruiz, MD on Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Esteban wants to make a difference in her community. As an indigenous woman, Esteban wants to break barriers that are set on women in her community. She told NBC News that her community expects for women to stay home and be stay-at-home mothers.

The incoming Harvard freshmen was discouraged from applying to Harvard at one point because of her community’s unreliable internet connection. Esteban lives in a mobile home with her family in Mecca and struggled to complete course work. The internet went down in the middle of her Harvard interview and it almost prevented her from applying to the university.

“Well, I felt proud and excited, every sort of emotion because I never would have believed that a person like me, would be accepted to a prestigious university,” Esteban told NBC News about being accepted to Harvard on a full scholarship.

READ: California, Harvard, MIT File Lawsuits To Challenge Government’s International Student Visa Announcement

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Mexico City is the oldest surviving capital city in all of the Americas. It also is one of only two that actually served as capitals of their Indigenous communities – the other being Quito, Ecuador. But much of that incredible history is washed over in history books, tourism advertisements, and the everyday hustle and bustle of a city of 21 million people.

Recently, city residents voted on a non-binding resolution that could see the city’s name changed back to it’s pre-Hispanic origin to help shine a light on its rich Indigenous history.

Mexico City could soon be renamed in honor of its pre-Hispanic identity.

A recent poll shows that 54% of chilangos (as residents of Mexico City are called) are in favor of changing the city’s official name from Ciudad de México to México-Tenochtitlán. In contrast, 42% of respondents said they didn’t support a name change while 4% said they they didn’t know.

Conducted earlier this month as Mexico City gears up to mark the 500th anniversary of the fall of the Aztec empire capital with a series of cultural events, the poll also asked respondents if they identified more as Mexicas, as Aztec people were also known, Spanish or mestizo (mixed indigenous and Spanish blood).

Mestizo was the most popular response, with 55% of respondents saying they identified as such while 37% saw themselves more as Mexicas. Only 4% identified as Spaniards and the same percentage said they didn’t know with whom they identified most.

The poll also touched on the city’s history.

The ancient city of Tenochtitlán.

The same poll also asked people if they thought that the 500th anniversary of the Spanish conquest of Tenochtitlán by Spanish conquistadoresshould be commemorated or forgotten, 80% chose the former option while just 16% opted for the latter.

Three-quarters of respondents said they preferred areas of the the capital where colonial-era architecture predominates, such as the historic center, while 24% said that they favored zones with modern architecture.

There are also numerous examples of pre-Hispanic architecture in Mexico City including the Templo Mayor, Tlatelolco and Cuicuilco archaeological sites.

Tenochtitlán was one of the world’s most advanced cities when the Spanish arrived.

Tenochtitlán, which means “place where prickly pears abound” in Náhuatl, was founded by the Mexica people in 1325 on an island located on Lake Texcoco. The legend goes that they decided to build a city on the island because they saw the omen they were seeking: an eagle devouring a snake while perched on a nopal.

At its peak, it was the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. It subsequently became a cabecera of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. Today, the ruins of Tenochtitlán are in the historic center of the Mexican capital. The World Heritage Site of Xochimilco contains what remains of the geography (water, boats, floating gardens) of the Mexica capital.

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