Entertainment

‘Club Mundo Kids’ Is a New Children’s Show Aimed At First and Second Generation Latino Children

Screenshot via YouTube

It’s no secret that there’s a shortage of programming out there for Latino children. Latino children are expected to consume children’s programming that features mostly white protagonists and simply put up with it. And when it comes to bilingual programming? Forget it. But a new show called “Club Mundo Kids” is trying to change all that.

“Club Mundo Kids” is a bilingual, educational program aimed at children of first and second generation Latino children.

The new show, hosted by former ABC News correspondent, Romi Puga, is aimed at the underserved audience of American Latino children who speak Spanish as their first language. However, “Club Mundo” also smatters in some English words here and there as part of their programming.

“There is very little content being created that is speaking to U.S. Hispanic, Latinx children and telling their stories,” Romi Puga recently told The New York Times. “The younger generation doesn’t really have anyone breaking things down and talking directly to them in a way that is digestible.”

Unlike “Dora the Explorer” or “Elena of Avalor“, “Club Mundo Kids” aims to talk to children about Latino life in a real world context.

While “Dora the Explorer” and “Elena of Avalor” are invaluable for showing Latino kids versions of themselves on screen, they function more as escapist entertainment. “Club Mundo Kids”, however,” features real-world Latinos in front of the camera–as well as a few Latino puppets.

Romi Puga hosts “Club Mundo Kids” from her backyard along with her “neighbors”, a friendly pink puppet named Maya and Coco, an adventurous puppet shaped like a coconut.

Together, Romi and her friends educate their young audience on important, real-world topics, like space exploration, recycling, and the Endangered Species Act.

They also discuss topics directly related to Latindad, like why different Latin American countries use different words and have different accents.

“We do a lot of that,” Romi told NBC News. “Just opening their minds to, ‘Hey, my classmate speaks Spanish but his Spanish doesn’t sound like mine. Why is that?’ And so we’re explaining that but in a fun way, and our hope is to encourage empathy, curiosity and that feeling of identifying with this show, which embraces multicultural identities.”

Above all, the creators of “Club Mundo Kids” hope that the show will create a space for American Latino children who feel like they don’t completely belong in either culture.

Since 2018, more than 1 in 4 newborns in the U.S. are Latino. These children have a complicated, multicultural identity that is being overlooked by the mainstream media. Romi, who was born in Miami but has parent from Chile and Argentina, understands this conflict firsthand.

“To me, that’s what I want ‘Club Mundos Kids’ to be — that group for kids, a place to identify, where they don’t need to pick one or the other,” she told NBC News. “They don’t need to pick English or Spanish but they can celebrate and be proud of their multicultural identities.”

“Club Mundo Kids” is currently airing on both Televisa and Universo.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

A New ‘Coco’ Short Film Called ‘A Day in the Life of the Dead’ Has Just Premiered on Disney+

Entertainment

A New ‘Coco’ Short Film Called ‘A Day in the Life of the Dead’ Has Just Premiered on Disney+

Photo via Pixar/Twitter

We have exciting news for die-hard fans of the beloved Pixar movie, “Coco”. Disney+ has just premiered an adorable short film that gives audiences a glimpse into the “average day in the afterlife” in the Land of the Dead.

The 2-minute film is called “A Day in the Life of the Dead” and features various calacas going about the daily lives.

The short film is part of a series called “Pixar Popcorn” that started streaming on Friday. The series will feature a variety of short films inspired by different Pixar movies, including “Toy Story”, “Finding Nemo,” “The Incredibles”, and of course (and most importantly)…”Coco”.

“A Day in the Life of the Dead” is as beautifully animated as the 2017 film is.

The 2-minute film is animated with the same lush, vibrant colors of the original film and rendered with Pixar’s signature creative vision of the Land of the Dead.

And to make things more exciting, the movie is littered with cameos from fan-favorite characters like Mamá Imelda, Héctor, and the jaw-dropping arrivals agent.

In fact, one of the funniest vignettes is when the arrivals agent repeatedly loses his jaw bone, including when he tries to take an (unsuccessful) bite of cortadillo.

In other parts of the short film, we watch calacas riding a tandem bike, exercising, playing with cute animals, and attempting to keep their heads on straight–literally.

But of course, most of the humor of the short film comes from the inherent comedy of skeletons try to accomplish daily tasks when their bodies keep falling apart.

But “A Day in the Life of the Dead” isn’t the only Pixar short film that’s part of the “Pixar Popcorn” series. There’s tons of cute shorts that will keep you or the little kid in your life entertained for a while.

The series also features the short films “Dancing With the Cars”, “Soul of the City”, “Chore Day: The Incredibles Way”, “Dory Finding”, and “To Fitness and Beyond”, and more. There are eleven short films all together–the perfect amount to binge in one sitting!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

PBS Is Making a New Show Called ‘Alma’s Way’ Centering Around a Puerto Rican Girl and Her Family

Entertainment

PBS Is Making a New Show Called ‘Alma’s Way’ Centering Around a Puerto Rican Girl and Her Family

Courtesy Fred Rogers Productions

Move over, Dora the Explorer! There’s a new Latina in town with her very own TV show and he name is Alma.

The new kids show is called “Alma’s Way” and it will be premiering on PBS Kids in the Fall of 2021.

Per PBS, “Alma’s Way” will center around “a proud, confident Puerto Rican girl, who lives in the Bronx with her parents and younger brother, Junior, as well as a diverse group of close-knit and loving friends, family, and community members.”

The show was created by the Emmy-winning actress Sonia Manzano, who you probably know as “Maria” from “Sesame Street”. According to Manzano, “Alma’s Way” is based on her childhood upbringing in the South Bronx.

“Alma’s way is to think things through, and I hope by animating the thought process, kids will be inspired and excited about what goes on in their own minds,” Manzano said in a statement. “I want them to know we all have the power to think regardless of who we are.”

Manzano has previously opened up about how her role on “Sesame Street” paved the way for Latinx representation onscreen. “I’m Puerto Rican, born in New York, watched a lot of television in 50s, never saw anybody who looked like me on television, and thereby began to feel invisible … and I wondered, how was I going to contribute to a society that didn’t see me?” she said in an interview with CBS. “Now, my position here on Sesame Street is so that other Hispanic children can watch me and say ‘Oh look, I exist in the world.'”

The show also plans to “showcase the diversity of New York City” and “authentically reflect the cultures of all the characters.”

This news is significant because there aren’t many children’s shows with Latino protagonists (even though Latinos are the fastest growing minority group in the U.S.) Other than “Dora the Explorer” and “Elena of Avalor” (which takes place in an alternate magical reality), kids shows with a Latino as the main character are few and far between.

According to research conducted at the Center for Scholars & Storytellers at UCLA, 65% of the human characters on American kids shows are white. To make things more problematic, only 38% of the main characters in U.S. children’s programming are female. So, “Alma’s Way” is doing double duty by making its main character both female and a person of color.

Let’s hope “Alma’s Way” is one of the many steps that Hollywood is taking to create more representation for Latinos in the media.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com