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Cardi B Talks About The Growing Coronavirus Pandemic And How ‘S–t Gettin’ Real’

Cardi B is known for her music and her videos on social media. She has been able to break down issues in our politics as well as defending laborers and sex workers. Now, the rapper is discussing one topic that has everyone talking: the novel coronavirus or COVID-19.

Cardi B is getting nervous about novel coronavirus COVID-19.

Like only Cardi B can, the rapper injected a little bit of humor into this dark and scary time for so many Americans. Schools are being closed. The NBA has suspended the rest of the 2020 season. New York is closing down Broadway after gatherings of 500 people were banned by the governor.

Cardi B addressed the health crisis on Instagram because she often shares her opinions to give a different perspective.

“Government, let me tell y’all m—— f——— something. I don’t know what the f— this coronavirus is about,” Cardi B said in the video. “I don’t understand how this shit was from Wuhan, China now all of a sudden this shit is on our m—— f——— soil. And let me tell y’all something. I’m not even gonna front. A bitch is scared. I’m a little scared, you know what I’m saying. Like, shit got me panicking.”

Cardi B admitted that she might not have taken this viral pandemic seriously enough at the beginning but now “s— is getting real.”

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Why Dominicans like this 😩

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But now, she is getting ready in response to the virus spreading across the U.S. According to the latest numbers, the U.S. currently has more than 1,300 people sick with the novel coronavirus. Thurty-eight people, mainly based in Washington state, have died of COVID-19. The most common demographic to die from the coronavirus are the elderly and those with underlying health conditions, like heart disease and diabetes.

During a second video, Cardi B injects a little bit of her classic style of humor with some rubbing alcohol.

Cardi B speaks on the real effect the coronavirus is having on the stock market and the real impact the virus will have on everyday people.

“Government. Government. Government. You wanna know something. I know s—’s getting real,” Cardi B says in the video. “Once the stock market starts going low, that’s how I know s—’s getting real cause ain’t nothing that white corporate America hates the most than losing m—— f——— money.”

She continued by telling viewers that she just wants to know a basic timetable of what to expect from this disease so she can start stocking up on emergency food. She also says she was considering moving to on of the Caribbean islands but that the disease spreading there is leaving with the option to move to Antarctica.

Health experts are currently working to find a vaccine for COVID-19. However, it is estimated that we are a year and a half away from achieving the vaccine.

The best way to prevent catching the virus is to wash your hands with soap and water for 24 seconds multiple times throughout the day after touching surfaces. It is also beneficial to avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth as that’s one way the virus can take hold.

READ: What To Know About The Coronavirus And How To Prevent It

Covid-19 Cases Surge In Meat-Processing Plants As COVID-19 Spreads In Rural America

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Covid-19 Cases Surge In Meat-Processing Plants As COVID-19 Spreads In Rural America

David Ryder / Getty Images

Meat processing plants have been at the center of the COVID-19 response conversation. The plants, many located in the Midwest, are crucial to the food supply chain to feed the country but outbreaks at these facilities have threatened that supply chain. Some closed to save the health of their employees but an executive order, with limited power, allowed for these plants to stay open.

The meat-processing industry is surprisingly small with 4 plants providing 80 percent of the meat in the U.S.

Workers at meat-processing plants have been testing positive for COVID-19 in April. The spread was quick and some plants began to shut down in late April and early May to avoid massive outbreaks in their plants. In early May, several plants closed to handle the outbreaks, including Tyson Foods, one of the largest pork-processing companies in the U.S.

New data shows that coronavirus cases are increasing in the U.S. meat processing plants. The numbers have tripled to 15,000 with 63 meat plant workers dying from the virus. Within a month, Tyson Foods, the country’s largest meat processing company, saw its number of coronavirus cases jump from 1,600 to 7,000.

The number of cases has spiked within meat-processing plants that have reopened.

In late April, President Trump signed an executive order that some people misinterpreted as ordering meatpacking and processing plants to remain open. What President Trump did was to order that meat and poultry plants are essential according to the Defense Protection Act of 1950. The DPA is used to compel manufactures to create “scarce and critical material essential to the national defense.”

The second thing the order did was to give the authority to Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue. Perdue is responsible for keeping the meat processing and packing plants running during the pandemic. He has to adhere to guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

As with some states, there are discrepancies showing in the data being released by the meat plants.

In North Carolina, the Smithfield meat-packing plant in Tar Heel is being elusive with their number of positive coronavirus cases. They are being assisted in the lack of transparency by state and local officials, according to The New York Times.

“There has been a stigma associated with the virus,” Teresa Duncan, the director of the health department in Bladen County, where the Smithfield plant is located, told The New York Times. “So we’re trying to protect privacy.”

A poultry plant in Arkansas was the cause of an outbreak in a Latino community.

In Arkansas, a community saw a spike in cases within the Latino community. The cases were coming from employees, their families, and their social circles. The one poultry plant resulted in 151 new cases in the Latino community of Dardanelle, Arkansas.

READ: Another Man Has Died Of Covid-19 In ICE Custody And The Agency Still Lacks Any Plan To Prevent More Deaths

A Louisiana Cop Has Been Fired After Saying It Was ‘Unfortunate’ That The Coronavirus Hasn’t Killed More Black People

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A Louisiana Cop Has Been Fired After Saying It Was ‘Unfortunate’ That The Coronavirus Hasn’t Killed More Black People

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study released last week, as U.S. deaths from the Coronavirus approached the 100,000 mark, shows that the black population is dying of the virus at a rate 3.57 times higher than the white population. In some places, such as New York, that rate is even higher.

That is apparently not enough for a Louisiana police officer, who has been fired for writing on Facebook that it is “unfortunate” more black people have not died of the deadly illness.

A white Louisiana cop has been fired following a social media post that revealed his views on the Coronavirus and black people.

Steven Aucoin was a police officer with the Kaplan Police Department – a town about 60 miles outside the Louisiana capital of Baton Rouge. He was fired earlier this month after an investigation showed he made extremely racist comments on a Facebook post.

Aucoin’s comments, which were shown in a screenshot of the live stream, were in response to another user who described the Coronavirus as the “virus that was created to kill all the BLACKS is death.” The officer clearly responded with two statements, “Well it didn’t work.” And directly under that comment he then said, “How unfortunate.”

In another section of the thread, Aucoin wrote, “I can’t wait until the next part of the plan is implemented and they see what’s in store for their kind.”

The police chief investigated the comments and quickly fired Aucoin.

Credit: Kaplan Police Department / Facebook

According to Kaplan Police Chief Joshua Hardy, the matter was looked into, investigated, and Aucoin was fired shortly after.

In a brief statement posted to Facebook, the agency said “Chief Hardy and the Kaplan Police Department would like to apologize for this matter. As a police officer, we’re held to a higher standard than normal civilians, so you got to watch what you do. You got to watch what you say.”

Aucoin’s firing was met with some applause – including in meme form – on the department’s Facebook page.

Credit: Kaplan Police Department / Facebook

“I applaud your swift and decisive action regarding this matter,” one commenter wrote. “Your willingness to serve notice on bigotry and ignorance is a genuine representation of redoubtable leadership that is necessary during these difficult times.”

The racist officer’s comments and firing comes as a number of high-profile racial incidences have made headlines across the country.

Credit: Shaun Rayford / Getty

Just a few weeks ago, the brutal murder of Ahmaud Arbery – a 25-year-old black man – made headlines after a video was shared on social media of former police officer Gregory McMichael and son Travis that chasing and gunning him down. The two men were arrested and public outrage over the lack of response from local officials in February has been wide-spread.

Shortly after that, a video showing a white Minneapolis Police Department officer kneeling on the neck of George Floyd for over 8 minutes, until he died, has sparked outrage and massive protests against the murder around the country.

Also in May, a white woman named Amy Cooper was walking her dog off the leash in Central Park in New York. When a black man  – Christian Cooper, who was out bird watching – asked if she could put her dog on the leash, she called the cops on him, saying her life was being threatened by an ‘African American man’. She has since been terminated from her job as head of insurance investment solutions at Franklin Templeton on Tuesday, having been placed on administrative leave a day earlier.