Entertainment

As If The Surreal Movie Adaptation Of ‘Cats’ Wasn’t Trippy Enough, People Are Watching It High And Omg The Reactions

From what reviewers and audiences have been saying about Cats, the surreal nature of the movie probably doesn’t need to be enhanced by adding psychedelic drugs. However, that didn’t stop adventurous moviegoers from sampling their drug of choice before sitting through the weird musical —to make the experience even weirder.

For most people, “Cats” is unnerving enough sober.

It tells the story of a group of singing, dancing alley cats who compete for the chance to go to the Heaviside Layer, a metaphor for death and rebirth into the next of their nine lives. Critics have described the movie adaptation as a feverish drug dream, a bad trip. It is expected to lose as much as $100 million, according to Variety. The budget, mind you, was more than $95 million, all going to a rushed production that found the film’s visuals still being cooked even after the movie opened wide over the Christmas holiday.

People are watching the movie on drugs—and their experiences are nothing short of wild.

According to a sweeping new story by The Washington Post, a fraction of that box-office take is coming from audience members who are seeing the movie on drugs, and the results are evidently transcendent. WaPo rounded up some of the best reactions from viewers that saw the movie on mind-altering substances as shrooms, LSD, edibles, and more.

The paper offered a list of compelling, if not encouraging, responses:

“The most terrifying experience of my life. I swear to God my soul escaped me.”

I mean this is a bit dramatic…right?

“Vomited four times but ultimately understood the film on a deep level.”

Now this is definitely a reaction that I think only a high person could have. If you’ve seen the movie, you know it’s true.

“Had a panic attack in the middle of it …”

I feel like this could happen whether you were high or not…

Raina, 25, from South Carolina, said she couldn’t handle the mismatched proportions of the furry animals.

She lasted 10 minutes, “and then I went to the AMC bathroom and threw up”.

Annaliese Nielsen, terrified by the furry face of James Corden, called the film “a special kind of evil”.

That last scene especially, is freaking people out.

Here Judi Dench’s Deuteronomy breaks the fourth wall to address the viewer, and freaks people out. “When Judi Dench turned and looked me directly in the eyes to let me know that a cat is not a dog, I was terrified.”

The movie may be hard to follow if you’re looking for a plot.

Because there is no plot. Basically all the cats —as portrayed by the likes of Rebel Wilson, Jennifer Hudson, Dench, Idris Elba, Ian McKellen, and Taylor Swift— are auditioning for eternal life in the Heaviside Layer, a heaven-like place of rebirth for cats in the upper atmosphere.

“Where their fur ends and their human hands start, it would move in a weird unnatural way,” one audience member told The Washington Post.

“I felt like I was losing my mind…I was just concentrating on taking deep breaths.”

Of course, your choice of whether to enhance the experience of Cats is yours —and your state’s— own, but from what we’ve seen, the movie is likely weird enough to simulate a drug trip without needing to consume them at all.

This Coronavirus-Themed Lotería Is The Perfect Kind Of Humor I Needed Right Now And It’s Even Available To Buy

Culture

This Coronavirus-Themed Lotería Is The Perfect Kind Of Humor I Needed Right Now And It’s Even Available To Buy

PINCHE_RAF_ART / Instagram

Coronavirus. Covid-19. Pandemic. Social-distancing. This is all the news we hear these days and as important as it is to stay up to date on what’s happening with the virus and how to stay safe and healthy, forgive me if I don’t want a tiny break from all the seriousness.

So, you can imagine my delight when I was scrolling my Twitter feed and saw tweet after tweet about a Coronavirus-themed lotería. La lotería is a tradition soooo many of us grew up playing so it’s interesting to see it get a 2020 interpretation.

Could this be real? What could the cards for el mano or la botella look like in this Covid-19 reality we’re currently living in? I had to find out.

So I sat down with an artist who’s created his own Coronavirus-themed lotería set to find out more about his inspiration.

Credit: PINCHE_RAF_ART / Instagram

Artist Rafael Gonzales Jr. (on Instagram as @PINCHE_RAF_ART) has created a series of incredibly unique lotería cards that can really thank the current Coronavirus pandemic for their existence: from face masks and hand sanitizer to toilet paper roll, these cards are emblematic of the times we’re living in.

The modern take on the traditional game is called ‘Pandemia Lotería’ and each card (he’s made 31 so far) features a name and image inspired by our new normal of social-distancing, self-isolation, extreme hand-washing, and even the stimulus checks.

What message were you hoping to send about the Coronavirus and our current climate by creating these new cards?

“You know originally this was a very selfish endeavor. I needed a creative outlet for the new experiences we are all going through. It became a project that helped me to connect to others through humor and a childhood game.  Now, I think my message has become one of bringing a lightness to the heaviness of the pandemic. It is a serious global problem, but laughing at our shared experiences is what being human is all about.”

Have you created new interpretations of all 54 cards – or if not, do you plan to create all 54?

Credit: PINCHE_RAF_ART / Instagram

“I have about 31 cards completed and 2 additional specialty cards that won’t be in the game I am putting out soon. My plan for the project is to get as many cards in an art print as possible. I have been a little sidetracked creatively with some of the business side of launching an e-commerce [site] for the game. It has been a whirlwind, but people have responded really well to the cards and my goal from the onset of all this was to try and paint the situation in a light form. To sort of change the heaviness of the news cycle and remind people that better days are coming and those better days often include a game of lotería.”

Are there specific reasons you chose these images to illustrate these titles or what’s your thinking behind them?

Credit: PINCHE_RAF_ART / Instagram

“Visually la Chalupa seems so sincere and serene. I feel it is one of the more complex original illustrations of lotería, so I thought it would be a humorous twist to associate her with fake news and the dolphins in the canals of Venice that were virally shared. The quaran15 was a simple, self-deprecating joke that ran through my head after my wife started to bake more. From banana bread to cookies, I knew I was putting on weight and gonna be built like a barril after all this. I used to see my grandmother’s use Armour manteca all the time to make tortillas and so the coloring became a play on that.”

Are you taking any suggestions? I know people who would love to see Susana Distancia and Los Amuletos (thanks, AMLO!)

“I’ve received a ton of suggestions and I think it has been great. I think part of the reason the cards have been popular is because they are relatable. I sometimes sit with a suggestion and see if it is something I can put my own twist on, while also staying true to my own vision for the project. Some ideas I don’t think I can do justice to or put in the right context so that is why I haven’t taken them on.”

Will it be possible to purchase these loteria cards? Or if it’s already possible, can you point our readers in the right direction?

“The game itself will be printed in a few weeks. Preorders went on April 23 and people can reserve theirs here and other merch like t-shirts can be found on my online store.”

And Rafael isn’t the only one getting in on the game – even Mexico City has its own Coronavirus-themed lotería game.

Credit: @dondeir / Twitter

Like so many other cities around the world, Mexico City is still under a strict stay-at-home order to help flatten the curve. With so many people stuck at home, what’s better than playing a game of an old favorite but with a relevant twist? And as the game’s creators point out – while being reminded of the measures we should all be taking to combat this pandemic.

The Coronavirus Lotería is available as a download to use as a background, you can share it on social media, or you can even play remotely with friends.

And last December, Google commemorated the game with its very own Google Doodle.

Credit: Google

Last December, Google had an online version of the game that replaced some cards for modern talks. The El ApacheEl borrachoEl diablitoEl gorritoLa muerteEl negritoEl soldado, and El valiente cards were replaced with El ajolote (“the axolotl“), El buscador, La conchaEl eloteEl emojiEl gorroEl guacamole, and El xoloitzcuintle (or the Mexican hairless dog.)

A Woman Left Racist Notes On People’s Front Doors Telling Them America Is A ‘Nation Of White People’

Things That Matter

A Woman Left Racist Notes On People’s Front Doors Telling Them America Is A ‘Nation Of White People’

@_dalenaaa / Twitter

Racism never stops in America – no need to look any further than the news headlines from the past 48 hours. From Central Park Karen to the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis by police officers, people of color continue to experience outrageous acts of racism.

During the global Coronavirus pandemic, racism and white supremacy have been used to ignite attacks against communities of color and especially at immigrants. Although the U.S. has the highest number of Covid-19 infections in the world, many Americans ignorantly continue to blame foreigners and immigrants for bringing the virus to the U.S.

A SF Bay Area woman left racist notes containing white supremacist views on doors of homes belonging to immigrants.

A white woman in the Oakland suburb of Dublin has been arrested by police for allegedly leaving handwritten racist messages at several homes, targeting immigrants.

The white supremacist notes suggested that those not native to the United States should leave the country immediately so a ‘white, brave, American’ could live there instead.

“If you are a woman or man and was born in other country, return, go back to your land immediately, fast, with urgency,” the note said. It ended with “One American, white, brave, that serves the Nation or USA is going to live here.”

According to police department news release, the messages were directed towards women and children as well. Officers from the department had investigated a similar incident after a “related note” ordering Asian people to “leave immediately” was found on an information board on a popular hiking trail. Police said they believe the same woman was responsible for that note as well as the others, “messages that instilled fear and intimidation upon those residents.”

Residents targeted by the notes posted the incident to their social media, which helped lead to the woman’s arrest.

One resident gave the officers images captured on his doorbell security camera of a woman taping the note, and the officers soon found her in the area, police said in a statement.

The photo of the note shows text referring to the U.S. Constitution and God, demanding that anyone “born in other country” go back immediately. The note includes white supremacist language. Another note posted to Twitter used similar language, claiming that “in this place no Asian allowed,” and mentioning a May 23 deadline.

The surveillance images shared on social media quickly led police to identify and arrest a suspect, Nancy Arechiga, 52, authorities said. She was “soon located near the community while officers were still in the area,” police said, adding that she was carrying a backpack containing “handwritten notes of the same nature.”

Reports of racist acts directed against Asian people have surged amid the outbreak of COVID-19.

Credit: Steven Senne / Getty

According to Stop AAPI Hate, an organization that’s been tracking self-reported incidents, more than 1,100 physical and verbal attacks against Asian Americans have been documented since late March. 

The high number of reports, which have been submitted over just two weeks, is especially striking since people across the country have predominantly been sheltering in place. The incidents — logged through the Stop AAPI Hate website, which launched on March 19 — are wide-ranging. 

In one, an Asian American child was pushed off her bike by a bystander at a park. In another, a family at a grocery store was spat on and accused of being responsible for the coronavirus. For some, including one Japanese restaurant owner, the harassment has come in the form of vandalism.

In a VOX interview, Manjusha Kulkarni says, “So many of us have experienced it, sometimes for the first time in our lives. It makes it much harder to go to the grocery store, to take a walk, to be outside our homes.”