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Latinas Talk: Therapy Hangovers

For all of the societal issues and pressures that Latinas are currently dealing with today, no doubt it’s important for us to have access to mental health tools. Seeing a psychiatrist or therapist can help with managing the strange times we are currently experiencing or, at the very least, help us to cope with them. But diving deep into personal traumas and issues can have different effects for different people. For some, the period after a session can be brutal, like a therapy hangover. For others, it can be insightful and empowering.

Recently, in an effort to normalize therapy, we asked Latinas how they typically feel right after a session and the responses were pretty insightful.

Check them out below.

The period after the session can be emotional.

“Once a week! There is always work to be done on myself and navigating that with the right therapist makes a huge difference. As someone with depression and anxiety, I have to protect myself in these emotional times while also have a space to heal from past traumas.” – carina.s.cruz

It can make some people feel on top of the world.

“I don’t talk to a therapist anymore but I remember feeling so good after my sessions, my therapist was amazing and some days I miss having those sessions.” – lxandreaa

Sometimes it can feel like its the best part of the week.

“I used to do biweekly, but now I switched it to weekly. It’s honestly the best part of my week. I can let me guard down and I don’t have to pretend that everything is ok. It’s nice to have an hour to openly process my grief and get valuable insight that leaves me feeling stronger and empowered.” – alexis.eileennn

So helpful that sometimes it’s worth doubling up on sessions.

“Weekly! And if she plans a two-week vacation, two times a week! 😆 I’ve been going to her for five years. I can’t imagine my life without her rn.” – likekatiebutwithanh

But ultimately for many Latinas, the period after a session can be empowering.

“Every two weeks! I feel empowered. I feel lighter. I feel like I have a solid compass in hand helping me on my journey. It helped to find someone who understood BIPOC trauma and generational racism so that I didn’t have to validate my experiences at the onset. My only regret is that I didn’t do therapy earlier in my life.” – feliciagonzalezbrown 

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Latinas Share Why They Wanted To Teach Their Children Their Native Language

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Latinas Share Why They Wanted To Teach Their Children Their Native Language

Stephen Dunn / Getty

In a world with so much rising intersectionality and access to language tools, many still feel that passing along the traditions of their languages is necessary. Studies have shown for decades that children who grow up in an environment where they’re exposed to different languages have a pathway ahead of them that is full of promise. Particularly when it comes to education and career opportunities.

But why else do some parents find it essential to teach their children their family’s native languages?

Recently, we asked Latinas why learning their native language is important to them.

Check out the answer below!

“So they can be a voice for others in their community .” –_saryna_


“Besides the fact that bilingual kids use more of their brains. I’d like to teach my baby my native language so they can feel closer to our roots and be able to communicate/connect with our community not just in the US, but in Latin America too.” –shidume

“So that when the opportunity arises they can pursue their endeavors with nothing holding them back!” –candymtz13


“It not only helps them be multilingual, but also reminded them of their ancestry. Their roots. It builds a certain connection that cannot be broken.”-yeimi_herc


“So they can communicate with their grandparents, so they have double the opportunities growing up so they know their roots. So many reasons.”
elizabethm_herrera

“Know where you came from, being bilingual for more job opportunities later, being able to communicate with family members.”- panabori25

“I don’t have children but I think a language is tied to the culture. For me Spanish is a direct representation of how romantic and dramatic and over the top in the most beautiful way latin culture is. Also I’m Dominican and we just blend and make up words which really represents how crazy my family is.” –karenmarie15


“If I don’t and they lose ties to their people meaning my family who only speaks Spanish and Italian than I myself am harming them. As a preschool teacher I always tell parents English will happen eventually that’s the universal language but teach them their home home language the one that grandma/pa and the rest of the family speaks. They lose their identity. Sure they make up their own eventually but they must never forget where they come from.” –ta_ta1009


“So he doesn’t lose the connection to his grandmother and great grandfather who only speak spanish. So if he ever hears someone struggling to communicate he can help and feel a sense of pride in his roots/culture. 🇸🇻 plus 🤞🤞 I want him to pick up a 3rd language too!” –cardcrafted

“To give them more opportunities in life. I feel that some stories can only be told with authenticity when they’re in their native language. If you have the opportunity to do so, please do.” –titanyashigh

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Women Are Sharing Why Gut Instincts Made Them Turn Down A Dream Job

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Women Are Sharing Why Gut Instincts Made Them Turn Down A Dream Job

FPG / Getty

We’re all familiar with the phrase “trust your gut.” Of course, while the ability to suss out a situation based on instinct might not always lead us down the easiest path, for the most part, many people believe that relying on our gut can help us get through even the hardest life experiences and oftentimes avoid them. In fact, according to research, the belief of trusting in one’s gut is upheld by over half of people living in the United States. But what about when your gut-instinct leads you away from something you might really want?

Recently, a post shared to Instagram about gut instinct caught our attention.

The post served as a reminder to us that its imperative to truly weigh what matters to you when considering a new job or promotion. Still, we couldn’t help but wonder what Latinas think. So we asked and got a whole heck of a lot of advice and answers.

Check them out below!

gverseukYessss! We need to be able to say no to a job with an organisation that we don’t think is right for us. However, this often isn’t an option for many of us, particularly womxn. 😩2d8 likesReply

meeze_82This is goals for me. To get my girls to where they can decline jobs offers becuase they’re smart and strong enough to know they can do better. 👏1d3 likesReply

theresalwayzplanzI took a job that paid more money but i didnt know what the work environment would be like. It was awesome making more money, but it was the first time i felt my mental health be in danger. I left. It was the best thing i did.1d2 likesReply

bellabelicenaAbsolutely! Prioritizing your mental wellness always comes first.♥️2dReply

jojajessI declined a job offer 2 wks ago during an interview. It was so awkward, but I was NOT feeling it. I flat out told her that I needed my job to contribute as much to me as I do to it.

“I ignored my gut for a job with a really significant pay increase in an upper management position. I regretted my decision the first few days I was there, the company culture was horrible, and the work hours were horrendous (11 hour days were seen as “normal”, you weren’t seen as a hard worker / dedicated employee unless you put in 70 hours or more.)” – TrifectaLoser

“I met a gentleman who said he always walks with the boss through the office. If the workers change their demeanor, for example stop smiling and talking and start looking busy, he won’t work there. Your thing looks similar, see how the employees interact and maybe even ask.” reidmrdotcom

“I may be stuck in my ways, but I won’t even go for an interview if I’m going to struggle commuting there, never mind moving to a new city etc just to take the job. But that said, definitely trust your gut.” –johnbarrymore2013

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