Entertainment

New York Radio Host Angie Martinez Is Telling Tekashi 69’s Story In An 8-Part Podcast All About The Rapper

Tekashi 69, also known as Daniel Hernandez, is getting an eight-part documentary podcast series dedicated to telling his life story titled “Infamous: The Tekashi 6ix9ine Story.” The rapper clearly isn’t done with sharing information, and this time he’s sharing everything about himself. The audio series was born from a partnership between Spotify and Complex.

Praised hip-hop journalist and radio host, Angie Martinez, aka the Voice of New York, will narrate the series, which takes a deep dive into the rise and fall of “2018’s biggest rapper.”

“Tekashi has a polarizing personality and his story has taken us on a roller coaster ride like nothing we’ve ever seen in hip-hop,” Martinez said in the release. “So, when Complex reached out with this project, I was excited about the opportunity to help tell this story.”

Just when we thought the rapper was about to quiet down, the Spotify project was announced.

Tekashi 69 is serving his sentence for racketeering, weapons and drug charges connected to his involvement with the Nine Trey Gangsta Bloods. He was sentenced back in December of 2019, to two years in prison after cooperating with federal authorities to reveal crimes committed by his former gang members. He has since requested to serve the remainder of his sentence at home instead of in a private prison, a plea that the judge presiding over his case denied.

“Infamous: The Tekashi 6ix9ine Story” will air weekly episodes starting Jan. 28, 2020 on Spotify.

The podcast’s plotline starts back in 2014 when Tekashi 69 was working behind a Bushwich deli counter and a customer, which ended up being his manager Kifano “Shotti” Jordan, told him he had what it took to become a rapper. The eight-part series will delve into Hernandez’s life from becoming a viral, rainbow-haired personality to a person behind bars for racketeering and firearms charges. 

The fallout from Tekashi 69’s testimony has found him labeled a “snitch.”

His former security will no longer work for him, and he is an outcast from the hip-hop community at large. That didn’t stop him from reportedly signing a $10 million recording contract, although it may cost him more to remain protected than to record and promote the music he allegedly worked on in prison, and there’s no telling who would buy that album anyway.

The Spotify original production tracks back Tekashi’s breakout from Instagram troll to hip-hop’s hottest commodity to cooperating witness in a wide-ranging gang sting that led to the downfall of the Nine Trey Bloods who backed Tekashi 69 in a mutualistic bid for funding and clout. 

The first episode is titled “We Scums, We Not Slimes.”

The episode begins with Tekashi’s infamous interview on the Breakfast Club, where the young rapper declared that he was the “King Of New York.” At this point in his career he had just fired his entire crew, and he felt untouchable. He used the interview as a platform to mock his ex-crew of Nine Trey Gangsta Bloods, live on the morning show. Many fans still credit this moment as the beginning of the end for the rapper. Days after the Breakfast Club interview, Tekashi was arrested on RICO charges, effectively placing his career on hold.

The episode then gets into how Hernandez ended up behind bars.

Martinez recalls an interview she had with the rapper where he emotionally expressed that he’d “wear sneakers out of the garbage” and he “didn’t shower for two months.” She then asked the question could there have been an opportunity for intervention early on in Hernandez’s youth, “especially given the untreated trauma experienced at a young age.”

Tekashi 69 has already landed an over $10 million record deal with his former label, 10K Projects. 

The deal includes two albums: one in English and one in Spanish. Meanwhile, Showtime is already hard at work on “Supervillian,” 6Tekashi 69 documentary, and 50 Cent’s series “Moment in Time” will also have an hour-long episode dedicated to the rapper. He’s the most wanted man in America in more ways than one.

The new episodes in the eight-episode series will drop every Tuesday, exclusively on Spotify. In each episode, listeners will listen to people who helped to shape the problematic artist: the Scumgang members who mentored him, members of the Nine Trey Gangsta Bloods, producers, and the people who encouraged the rapper’s transformation from a Bushwick kid to the multimillionaire, colorful hair rapper, to a convicted felon.

READ: After Tekashi69 Cooperated With Authorities Against His Gang He Now Fears Spending Time In Prison

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Luis Gerardo Méndez Explores The Time Mexico Legalized Drugs In New Podcast

Entertainment

Luis Gerardo Méndez Explores The Time Mexico Legalized Drugs In New Podcast

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In the 1940s, one doctor had the idea of curing addiction by legalizing drugs in Mexico. After six months, and some success, the entire project was abandoned. Luis Gerardo Méndez is digging into where the idea came from and why it was abandoned in a new podcast.

Luis Gerardo Méndez and his friends are exploring the time when Mexico legalized drugs.

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It was 1940 and the Mexican government legalized all drugs. Doctors were able to prescribe their patients drugs in a methodical way to slowly get addicts off of drugs. Dr. Leopoldo Salazar Viniegra is credited with creating the program that showed success during the short time that it was allowed to be.

Gerardo learned about Dr. Salazar only recently and is excited to be able to tell the story of the Mexican doctor. The actor is a little shocked that more people do not know about the doctor who could have changed the course of history had he been allowed to proceed.

“I was immediately hooked on the story because I had no idea that that happened. To be honest with you, 99 percent of the people that I know in Mexico have no idea that drugs were legal in the ‘40s,” Gerardo admits. “It was really interesting for me, not just for the story but I was really intrigued about why we don’t know about this. Why didn’t anyone that I know know about this doctor and the incredible work that he did 80 years ago? He was a doctor who was 80 years ahead of his time and the world.”

Gerardo promises, without revealing spoilers, just how the U.S. managed to undercut the medical program.

The U.S. was not happy with Mexico experimenting with this kind of legaliztion. The host hints at talking about Harry Anslinger, the First Commissioner of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics. He held the position from 1930 to 1962 and, according to Gerardo, he placed some pressure on Mexico to re-evaluate the program.

“You, as the audience, in a way, realize that the legalization in Mexico ended because of the pressure from the U.S.,” Gerardo says. “The U.S. was putting a lot of pressure on Mexico telling them that they can’t do this about the legalization effort. Now, marijuana is legal in the U.S. and in Mexico we are still having this conversation. I’m pissed. Its not cool. I think it is really important to talk about these things.”

Despite the president supporting the measure, it was rolled back after six months.

The program was helping people get medical attention for their addiction issues and started to curb criminal activity around drugs. The cartels were losing business because addicts and drug users could seek proper medical attention from doctors to get their drugs for free.

Part of the program involved slowly weening people off of their drug addiction. It got people back into a healthier lifestyle while getting them back into the job market.

While Gerardo stops short of endorsing legalizing marijuana today, he is interested in showing people all sides of the conversation. The host splits his time between Mexico City and LA and has seen the marijuana industry take off in the U.S. but not in Mexico. He feels frustrated that the conversation in Mexico hasn’t advanced to the same place where the U.S. is.

“The same people doing that work in Mexico are criminals because someone behind a desk is saying what it legal and what’s not. Especially when this system proves that it works in the U.S. It is making millions of dollars in taxes for schools, for public health, and in Mexico we are still thinking about it,” Gerardo says about the difference in the U.S. and Mexico round marijuana legalization. “I think, again, I’m not saying whether I am in favor or not. I’m just saying that it is really important for me to expose these points of view and open a conversation for the mainstream.”

For Gerardo, telling the story is a point of pride in his Mexican heritage.

“The other thing is that sometimes in the world, we have an idea of all of these progressive ideas come from Europe or they come from the U.S.,” Gerardo says. “Yet, this Mexican doctor had this idea, this really really interesting and strong point of view 80 years ago and no one listened. No one listened to him. For me, I feel really proud to share the story of this man because I think he, in a way, is a hero. He was pretty close to stopping the drug cartel war.”

Dr. Salazar was a visionary of his time. His work to legalize drugs and work to treat drug addiction like a mental and physical health issue was promising. We have seen this same stance done in Portugal decades after Mexico tried it with the same positive results.

“It’s so incredible that we are hearing about this doctor, now, 80 years after this extraordinary things. He was one of the most polemic figures in Mexico and in the United Nations because of his way of thinking,” Gerardo says. “What I thought was really interesting and sad is that we are hearing about this guy 80 years later. He made some really powerful people really pissed and they erased him from the story.”

READ: The Controversy Behind Delta-8 THC And Why Shoppers Are Buying It Up

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Lil Uzi Got A $24 Million Diamond Pierced To His Forehead And Twitter Has Thoughts

Entertainment

Lil Uzi Got A $24 Million Diamond Pierced To His Forehead And Twitter Has Thoughts

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While us normies wait in anticipation for our country’s leaders to make up their minds about our stimulus checks, the wealthy aren’t at all bashful about flashing their wealth and riches. From spending tons of money on covid tests to shelling out money for private parties in a pandemic they’re spending it all.

Of course, we know it’s none of our business how people choose to spend their money, still, we can’t help but raise our eyebrows at the latest spending decision one rapper Lil Uzi Vert recently made.

Last week, Rapper Lil Uzi Vert unveiled a brand-new forehead piercing featuring an insane pink diamond.

When Uzi tweeted back on January 30, that he had been saving up for a natural pink stone worth a total of $24 million since 2017 we were of course surprised. At the time, Uzi told fans that he’d been saving up for a diamond that was “10 almost 11 carats.”

Last Wednesday, Uzi shared a video of the new piercing, revealing that he’d put it smack in the middle of his forehead.

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“Beauty is pain,” Uzi posted about the image and fans were quick to note that the forehead piercing looked slightly off-centered.

Uzi was quick to point out that while the diamond may appear to be off-center it always looks that way for now because of swelling. “Y’all keep talking about it’s off, it still has a long bar in it so it can move ‘cause of the swelling,” he explained in a post shared to his Instagram Story. “When it goes down, it gon’ be right there.”

According to an interview with Yahoo and Luis Garcia, the vice president of the Association of Professional Piercers, Uzi did receive a pierce, contrary to the implant theory that some fans have suggested.

“It looks like he has what we would call a vertical bridge piercing, as in the bridge of the nose. That would be an actual piercing with a staple shape barbell that enters at one point, exits at another, and then the big diamond attaches to that bar on the front,” Garcia tells Yahoo Life. “It’s a piercing, while obviously not super common in typical circles, it’s fairly common in piercing circles. …Definitely not with a giant $24 million diamond on it. But it’s something that gets done.”

Garcia says that the style of piercing could cause some problems for the rapper in the future.

“With such a big piece, the weight of it, day to day life like washing your face, sleeping, rolling around, wearing a hoody, it’s just gonna be so easy to get that thing snagged. That’s really where the main concern is,” Garcia told Yahoo. “The chances of it working out are slim.”

So, why didn’t Uzi just put his diamond on a ring?

When asked why he didn’t just put the stone on a ring and call it a day, Uzi said he was “literally tryna turn into a diamond.”

Of course, fans also had jokes to make.

Welp, it’s all To Be Determined on whether or not Lil Uzi’s forehead piercing ends up sticking but here’s hoping it definitely does not get snatched!

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