Entertainment

“Riverdale” Production Put To A Stop Over Coronavirus Concerns

Something spooky has come to the town of Riverdale and it ain’t Sabrina Spellman.

Amidst the coronavirus scare the beloved teen drama series has announced that it has halted production.

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According to Variety, “Riverdale” put a pause on production after a member of production — no news yet if it is cast or crew — reportedly came in contact with someone diagnosed with coronavirus. The suspension comes at a time that the series is filming its fourth season and hysteria has shut down various other events. Recently it was announced by Deadline that The Kids’ Choice Awards have been postponed.

“The Kids’ Choice Awards scheduled for March 22, 2020, in Los Angeles is being postponed in consideration of the safety and well-being of every person involved with the show, which is our top priority. We will have further information about a new date in the future,” the statement published by Deadline read. Earlier this week it was announced that the NBA suspended its current season.

Coronavirus is a highly contagious respiratory disease but there are preventative measures you can take to protect yourself.

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Do your part in avoiding spreading the disease and getting sick by heeding the advice of the Centers for Disease Control. Measures for preventative action include washing your hands often for 20 seconds or more, putting distance between yourself and other people, and staying home if you feel sick.

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Peru’s Indigenous Are Turning To Ancestral Medicines To Fight The Coronavirus

Culture

Peru’s Indigenous Are Turning To Ancestral Medicines To Fight The Coronavirus

Joao Laet / Getty Images

With news headlines like “How Covid-19 could destroy indigenous communities”, it’s hard to understate the affect that the Coronavirus has had on Indigenous communities across the world.

Even before the pandemic hit, native populations were already at increased risk of health complications, poor access to medical care, lack of proper education, and even premature death. The pandemic has only exacerbated these issues as government programs and NGOs who delivered aid to far flung communities have grind to a halt.

However, many communities have started taking the matter into their own hands by creating their own impromptu healthcare systems based on ancestral techniques and others have barricaded off their villages from the outside world in an effort to stem the flow of the virus.

In Peru, many Indigenous communities are turning to centuries-old medicines to fight back against the Coronavirus.

The Coronavirus has had a devastating impact on Peru – the country with the world’s highest per capita Covid-19 mortality rate. At particular risk is the nation’s large Indigenous community, who often lack proper access to education efforts and medical care. This has forced many Indigenous groups to find their own remedies.

In the Ucayali region, government rapid response teams deployed to a handful of Indigenous communities have found infection rates as high as 80% through antibody testing. Food and medicine donations have reached only a fraction of the population. Many say the only state presence they have seen is from a group responsible for collecting bodies of the dead.

At least one community, the Indigenous Shipibo from Peru’s Amazon region, have decided to rely on the wisdom of their ancestors. With hospitals far away, doctors stretch too thin and a lack of beds, many have accepted the alternative medicine.

In a report by the Associated Press, one villager, Mery Fasabi, speaks about gathering herbs, steeping them in boiling water and instructing her loved ones to breathe in the vapors. She also makes syrups of onion and ginger to help clear congested airways.

“We had knowledge about these plants, but we didn’t know if they’d really help treat COVID,” the teacher told the AP. “With the pandemic we are discovering new things.”

One of the plants the Shipibo are using is known locally as ‘matico.’ The plant has green leaves and brightly colored flowers. And although Fasabi admits that these ancestral remedies are by no means a cure, the holistic approach is proving successful. She says that “We are giving tranquility to our patients,” through words of encouragement and physical touch.

Even before the Coronavirus, Indigenous communities were at a greater risk for infectious diseases.

Indigenous peoples around the globe tend to be at higher risk from emerging infectious diseases compared to other populations. During the H1N1 pandemic in Canada in 2009, for example, aboriginal Canadians made up 16% of admissions to hospital, despite making up 3.4% of the population.

Covid-19 is no exception. In the US, one in every 2,300 indigenous Americans has died, compared to one in 3,600 white Americans.

Indigenous groups are particularly vulnerable to dying from Covid-19 because they often live days away from professional medical help. As of July 28, the disease had killed 1,108 indigenous people and there had been 27,517 recorded cases, with the majority in Brazil, according to data published by Red Eclesial Panamazonia (Repam).

Some communities are turning inward to survive COVID-19, barricading villages and growing their own food.

Despite the immense threat they face, Indigenous communities are fighting back.

“I am amazed to see the ways that indigenous peoples are stepping up to provide support where governments have not,” Tauli-Corpuz, a teacher at Mexico’s UNAM, told The Conversation. “They are providing PPE and sanitation, making their own masks, and ensuring that information on Covid-19 is available in local languages, and are distributing food and other necessities.”

They are also choosing to isolate. In Ecuador’s Siekopai nation, about 45 Indigenous elders, adults and children traveled deep into the forest to their ancestral heartland of Lagartococha to escape exposure to the Coronavirus, says the nation’s president Justino Piaguaje.

Despite their best efforts, many experts are extremely concerned for the survival of many Indigenous communities.

Credit: Ginebra Peña / Amazonian Alliance

They are already facing the ‘tipping point’ of ecological collapse due to increased threats of deforestation, fires, industrial extraction, agribusiness expansion and climate change,” Amazon Watch executive director Leila Salazar-Lopez told UNESCO of Amazonian Indigenous groups.

“Now, the pandemic has created one more crisis, and as each day passes, the risk of ethnocide becomes more real.”

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NBC Is Giving ‘The Golden Girls’ A Black Reboot Starring Tracee Ellis Ross

Entertainment

NBC Is Giving ‘The Golden Girls’ A Black Reboot Starring Tracee Ellis Ross

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From 1985 to 1992 fans of Betty White and Beatrice Arthur tuned in once a week to watch a group of senior citizen roomies living in Miami on a show called “The Golden Girls.” The Emmy- nominated sitcom became a beloved series that won popularity in syndication amongst fans young and old. And that includes fans of color.

Now, the dedicated audiences of “The Golden Girls” is getting a reboot and this time it’s gonna be super Black.

“The Golden Girls” is getting an all-Black cast for one night.

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Over the weekend, actress Tracee Ellis Ross shared a video on her Instagram account which revealed the big news. The video shows the old cast replaced with the new onerevealing who is taking on which role. According to the video, Ross will take on the role of Rose Nylund which was originated by White, King will replace Arthur’s role of Dorothy Zbornak, Lathan will take on McClanahan’s role as Blanche Devereaux, and Woodward will fill in Getty’s role of Sophia Petrillo.

Woodard, Ross, Lathan, and King will star in the re-imagining of the hit 1980s comedy series which will air tonight for a Zoom Where It Happened virtual watch party.

“In an effort to further engage our community and drive change, all you need to do to enjoy this evening is sign up to receive messages about how you can make a change during this election!” says the page for the event. “This event is in partnership with Zoom, and the first episode is spotlighting and supporting Color of Change – the nation’s largest online racial justice organization.

“The Golden Girls” reboot isn’t the only show revamped virtually for charity.

Earlier this summer NBC brought the cast from the beloved “Parks and Recreation” series together for a reunion. Actors Amy Poehler, Rashida Jones, Aziz Ansari, Nick Offerman, Aubrey Plaza, Chris Pratt, Adam Scott, Rob Lowe, Jim O’Heir, and Retta all took part in the reunion alongside a group of guest stars from the Pawnee world.

“Like a lot of other people, we were looking for ways to help and felt that bringing these characters back for a night could raise some money,” the show’s executive producer Michael Schur said in a statement. “I sent a hopeful email to the cast and they all got back to me within 45 minutes. Our old ‘Parks and Rec’ team has put together one more 30-minute slice of (quarantined) Pawnee life and we hope everyone enjoys it. And donates!”

The show works to raise funds for families in need during the time of the pandemic.

“In such uncertain times, we can’t think of anyone better than Leslie Knope to unite our country with her unbridled enthusiasm and compassion,” Lisa Katz and Tracey Pakosta, co-presidents of scripted programming at NBC Entertainment also explained in a statement. “A huge thank you to Mike Schur and the cast of ‘Parks and Recreation’ for putting this wonderful special together and bringing a smile to all our faces while raising money for such a worthwhile cause.”

“The Golden Girls” special airs tonight at 9 p.m. EST/6 p.m. PST. The show will be directed by Gina Prince-Bythewood and hosted by actress Lena Waithe.

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