Culture

Here Are 5 Ways To Stay Organized And Efficient In 2021

One of the hardest things about accomplishing things is not being organized. Maybe this is something you already excel in. However, maybe you are someone who needs a little help. We got you covered.

Keep A Calendar

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This can be any calendar you want to use. Maybe you want a cheesy fireman of the month calendar to hang on the wall. Maybe you finally use your phone’s calendar to its fullest extent. Either way, using a map is a great way to get really organized with your obligations. It gives you a chance to see everything at a glance. If you put everything on a phone, you can get notifications to make sure that you never forget anything ever again.

Make Lists

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Literally make so many lists. Make daily lists. Make weekly lists. Lists are a good way to keep track of what you have to do on a micro level. Being able to scratch something off the list as you do it is so satisfying.

Create A Plan

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Plan everything out. Make plans for all of that things you have to do. There might be steps to get something done. Don’t jump in without planning it out because that could cost you a lot of time and headache. Be like your mami and always think things all the way through, even if it is annoying. Trust the process.

Buy A Planner

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Reach back into those middle school days and get yourself a planner. Yes. An annoying, daily planner where you write things down and use stickers to highlight different categories. It will be both very helpful and incredibly nostalgic. Get those highlighters ready.

Don’t Overwhelm Yourself

This is the most important tip on staying organized. Do not over extend yourself this year. Commit to what you can handle and schedule. Don’t double book or give yourself crazy long hours. Always make time for self-love and self-care. You are too important to let yourself burn out from doing too much.

READ: These 9 Latina Self-Care Bloggers Are Making Mental Health Practices Accessible To Everyone’s Home During Quarantine

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Trillions Of Cicadas Are Set To Invade The U.S. After 17 Years Of Living Underground

Things That Matter

Trillions Of Cicadas Are Set To Invade The U.S. After 17 Years Of Living Underground

Minasse Wondimu Hailu/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

In what is peak 2021 news, reports are stating that literally trillions of cicadas are set to emerge from their underground lives to invade portions of the United States. The bugs, colloquially but incorrectly known as “locusts,” are expected to appear for the first time since 2004 across 15 states in the Eastern U.S. 

Of course, given the newscycle of 2020 and 2021 we really shouldn’t be surprised but still – yikes!

Scientists say to expect giant swarms of bugs in several U.S. states come the spring.

Trillions of cicadas are set to emerge across 15 U.S. states this spring, as a colony of insects known as Brood 10 awakens from a 17-year-long hibernation. Having spent almost two decades underground in their immature “nymph” state eating tree root sap, the bugs will crawl out in mid-May to late June when soil hits 64 degrees Fahrenheit—likely after a sprinkling of warm rain. Once above ground, the insects will set about mating, the noise of which can hit 100 decibels, and lay their eggs before dying.

Scientists say that Americans across 15 states – Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington, D.C – can expect densities of 1.5 million bugs per acre! That’s a whole lot of bugs, almost biblical. 

The return of the cicadas typically starts around mid-May and runs through late June and is, needless to say, a wild spectacle. Some people view the insect invasion as an annoyance, while others welcome it as a wonder of nature. Some in the latter category even travel around the US to cicada emergence areas to experience the sights and sounds annually.

Experts want to assure everyone that these bugs are harmless and can even be a joy to watch.

Although the idea of swarms of insects appearing from the earth may sound unbearable and frightening, many insect enthusiasts and scientists view this as a wonderful opportunity for millions of people to witness and enjoy a remarkable biological phenomenon in their own backyard that happens nowhere else on the planet.

Experts point out that the bugs are harmless and typically don’t come indoors, though they do gather on outside walls, which let’s be real is pretty gross in its own right. The only way they could get inside is accidentally flying in through an open door or window, or because they had landed on a person who then carried them inside unnoticed.

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11 Books By Latinas And Latinx Coming In 2021 That We Are Stoked About

Fierce

11 Books By Latinas And Latinx Coming In 2021 That We Are Stoked About

The new year has arrived, and it’s stacked with a batch of new books for readers to devour. 

While good reads might not heal us from the pains and losses of 2020 or save us from the uncertainties that remain ahead in 2021, being able to take a break from reality through literary fantasy or illuminating nonfiction can be gratifying (and healthy!).

For those searching for titles to pre-order among the abundance of new works expected in 2021, we have you covered. From debuts by some of our generation’s most brilliant thinkers to anticipated novels you’ll get through in one sitting, here are some exciting books by Latinas and Latinxs you’ll want to add to your reading list.

1. One of the Good Ones by Maika Moulite and Maritza Moulite (January 5, 2021)

Inkyard Press

The highly anticipated novel One of the Good Ones, by Hatian-American sisters Maika Moulite and Maritza Moulite, is a timely read about a teenage activist who is killed under mysterious circumstances after attending a social justice rally and the family that is left reeling after his death. Tackling police violence and sisterhood, the book, published by Inkyard Press on January 5, explores the impact of racism, prejudice and allyship.

2. We Are Here: Visionaries of Color Transforming the Art World by Jasmin Hernandez (February 2, 2021)

ABRAMS

In We Are Here: Visionaries of Color Transforming the Art World, Dominican-American Jasmin Hernandez profiles 50 artists and art entrepreneurs of color who are challenging the status quo in the art world. Hernandez, founder of Gallery Gurls, interviews queer, trans, non-binary, Black and brown visionaries influencing communities from New York to Los Angeles, talking with them about their creative process and how they are creating a radically inclusive world across the entire art ecosystem. The book, which features stunning portraits of each artist, will publish on February 2.

3. Fat Chance, Charlie Vega by Crystal Maldonado (February 2, 2021)

Holiday House

Puerto Rican author Crystal Maldonado’s Fat Chance, Charlie Vega is an exciting new addition to YA. The coming-of-age novel centers on a fat Latina girl living in a fatphobic white Connecticut suburb. Her mom wants her to lose weight. Society doesn’t love her brown skin. And her crush might be into her best friend. The book, which will be published by Penguin Random House on February 2, has been described as funny, charming and raw. 

4. Infinite Country by Patricia Engel (March 2, 2021)

Avid Reader Press / Simon & Schuster

Patricia Engel’s Infinite Country is a novel about a divided Colombian family. The book, which has been called “powerful” and “breathtaking,” tells the tale of Talia, a teen being held at a correctional facility for adolescent girls in Colombia, and a U.S.-based family fighting to be reunited with her. The novel, which will hit bookshelves on February 23, deals with yearning, family, belonging and sacrifice. 

5. What’s Mine and Yours by Naima Coster (March 2, 2021)

Grand Central Publishing

Naima Coster, the Afro-Dominican author of Halsey Street, has another anticipated novel in What’s Mine and Yours. The book, dealing with issues of race, identity, family and legacy, centers on two families, one Black and one white, and how their lives become integrated and messy when a county initiative draws students from a largely Black town into predominantly white high schools. The book, set to publish by Grand Central Publishing on March 2, covers a span of 20 years, and it explores the ways families break apart and come back together.

6. The Soul of a Woman by Isabel Allende (March 2, 2021)

Random House Publishing Group

Award-winning author Isabel Allende returns in 2021 with The Soul of a Woman, a reflection on feminism, power and family rooted in the Chilean writer’s upbringing and experiences. The autobiographical work seeks to answer the question: What feeds the soul of feminists – and all women – today? For her, it’s safety, value, peace, resources, connection, autonomy and love, but these battles haven’t all yet been won. The inspirational read, which will be published by Ballantine Books on March 2, aims to ignite a fire in younger generations to continue to carry the work of feminism forward.

7. The Mirror Season by Anna-Marie McLemore (March 16, 2021)

Feiwel & Friends

In Mexican-American author Anna-Marie McLemore’s latest piece of YA magical realism, The Mirror Season, they tell the story of a young girl, Graciela, and boy, Lock, who were both assaulted at the same party. When Lock appears at Graciela’s school, she realizes he has no idea what happened to them. The pair develop a cautious friendship through her family’s possibly-magical pastelería, but Graciela, hoping to keep them both safe, hides the truth from her new friend – a secret that could tear them apart. The Mirror Season will be available at book shops on March 16.

8. Of Women and Salt by Gabriela Garcia (March 31, 2021)

Flatiron Books

Cuban-Mexican author Gabriela Garcia’s debut Of Women and Salt, slated to release on March 31, has already got a lot of people excited. The novel takes place in present-day Miami, where Jeanette, who is battling addiction, seeks to learn more about her family history from her Cuban mother, Carmen, who is still wrestling with her own trauma of displacement. Hungry to understand, Jeanette travels to Cuba, where conversations with her grandmother force her to reckon with secrets from the past.

9. For Brown Girls with Sharp Edges and Tender Hearts: A Love Letter to Women of Color by Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodriguez (September 2021)

Seal Press

Nashville-based Nicaraguan writer and speaker Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodriguez is among the most brilliant Latina thinkers of our generation. In For Brown Girls with Sharp Edges and Tender Hearts: A Love Letter to Women of Color, a forthcoming book inspired by a 2016 essay, the founder of Latina Rebels explores the inequalities of race, class and gender, discussing issues of code-switching, colorism, intersectional feminism, decolonization and more. The book, which will be published by Seal Press, is expected to hit bookstores in September.

10. When We Make It by Elisabet Velasquez (Fall 2021)

Penguin Random House

Nuyorican poet and author Elisabet Velasquez’s YA debut When We Make It is a timely novel-in-verse that explores mental health, the war on drugs, gentrification, poverty and racism. Set in 1990s Bushwick, Brooklyn, the novel centers on Sarai, a first-generation Puerto Rican eighth-grader, who navigates the strain of mental illness, family trauma, toxic masculinity and housing insecurity while living with determination and love. When We Make It, published by Penguin Random House and expected to release in the fall, is a love letter to girls of color who were made to believe they would never make it.

11. Dreaming of You by Melissa Lozada-Oliva (Fall 2021)

Colombian-Guatemalan poet and author Melissa Lozada-Oliva’s Dreaming of You is a genre-bending verse novel about a young Latinx poet grappling with loneliness and heartache. The novel, which sees the teen bringing the Queen of Tejano Music Selena Quintanilla back to life through a seance, is an uncanny tale that interrogates Latinx identity, womanhood, obsession, disillusion and what it means to be seen. The book, coming from Astra House, is set to publish in the fall.

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