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These 9 Latina Self-Care Bloggers Are Making Mental Health Practices Accessible To Everyone’s Home During Quarantine

This post was originally published Sept 18, 2018, and updated August 16, 2020.

There’s no doubt that staying at home while governments and world leaders attempt to flatten COVID-19 curve has many of us feeling helpless and out of control. To cope, some of us are taking up hobbies, baking bread and Facetiming but ensuring that we’re keeping in touch with our mental health in other ways is particularly important.

If you need extra motivation to live your healthiest life, look no further than these Latina wellness bloggers:

Celebrating food, language, and community, De Las Mías empowers Latinas to live healthier, more joyful lives.

Founded by mother-daughter duo Ana Consuelo Matiella and Sada Naegelin, De Las Mías is a platform for all Latinas. Built on confianza, De Las Mías believes that a healthy lifestyle is achieved through support from your marinas, comadres y amigas. Besides offering options for healthier eating, motivated movement and clarity, they also offer a free lifestyle app.

Wellness also means maintaining our emotional health and Cosmic Christine is here for it.

Licensed therapist and love addiction coach, Christine Gutierrez runs Cosmic Christine; a site dedicated to cleansing and care. The self-titled diosa even hosts retreats where you can embrace your inner light and become one of her diosas too.

Somos Fit Latinas is a Houston, Texas-based fitness community with members from all over the world.

Focusing on fitness, positive personal growth and balancing our traditions with healthy habits, Somos Fit Latinas is pure wellness goals. And their yearly Taco Run — a marathon during which participants actually get to snack on their fave tacos — is reason enough to want to join!

Reminding us that health is not only about diet and exercise, Cultura Con Wellness stands for the reproductive health of Latinas.

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Hey fam! ⠀ Welcome to HATW where bilingual sex ed empowers people! 👊🏾 ⠀ I’m seeing some fresh faces on here. Some of you might be thinking of the: Who What Why… of this page. ⠀ Who’s behind HATW? And who is it for? ⠀ My name is Cindy, I’m 34 years old. Born and raised in Los Angeles. My preferred gender pronouns are she/her/ella. I’m a ciswoman, bilingual Latina, woman of color and able-bodied. ⠀ I’m the oldest daughter of Central American immigrants. I have a Guatemalan side (mom’s) + a Salvadorian side (dad’s) of my family. Both sides made who I am today. ⠀ I’ve worked in public education in different capacities since 2007. From administrative to clerical roles in schools and districts for low-income families and communities. ⠀ I have a Bachelors in Spanish Language and Literature, specialization in healthcare interpretation and translation, bilingual sex educator and finishing up my Masters in Latin American Studies (<1 month away!) ⠀ I share this with you because I rarely ever saw or see folks in my community openly share their accomplishments. In fact, it seems to be a common thread among women of color to minimize their hard work. ⠀ I’m here to let you know that your hard work is yours, own that sh*t unapologetically. ⠀ Who is this page for? ⠀ This is for anyone with an open mind who wants to break the cycle of sexual shame. Wants to learn about their body to become more confident in who they are because they know about their body. Essentially anyone wanting to move toward bodily autonomy. ⠀ As someone who grew up in the Latinx community, I saw first hand the disadvantages to not receiving sex ed. Latinx culture is interwoven with cisheteropatriarchy, machismo, reproductive oppression, domestic violence, Judeo-Christian doctrine, anti-blackness, homophobia, transphobia, and anti-indigenous thoughts and behaviors. ⠀ It’s A LOT to process. However, there is so much greatness in Latinx culture too. Afro-indigeneity makes our culture rich. Denying it is what white supremacy wants because it stripped our ancestors of their identity. ⠀ (Continues in comments)👇🏾

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L.A. based Cindy Luquin, wants you to feel empowered enough about your body to ask the real questions regarding reproductive health. With regular podcasts about contraception, well-woman issues and general anatomy 101, Culture Con Wellness will teach you a thing or two about your most personal spaces.

Dedicated to women’s wellness, La Saludable Latina offers insights for a more harmonious body and mind.

A podcast and blog hosted by Women’s Wellness coach Lilia Gomez, B.S., MSW, this resource takes health past just exercise and diet. La Saludable Latina focuses on topics like mindful breathing and creating peaceful spaces as well as traditional fitness and health topics.

Full of affirmations and plant-based diet tips, Holistic Samantha knows growth can take many forms.

Run by holistic health practitioner Samantha Otero, the blog encourages the use of natural living for a more organic take on wellness. Nutritional therapy and superfoods are promoted by Holistic Samantha but so is mental healing and reflection.

Healthy Latina Lifestyle will inspire you to be zen AF with its focus on yoga, exercise and cleansing from the inside out.

Dallas-based Veronica Torres Hazley is a yoga boss and sacred self-care workshop coordinator who knows life is better with a little meditation. But Healthy Latina Lifestyle is more than a blog. Events like Taco & Chill, Namaste Lit and her upcoming Hey Chica Summit bring her brand of wellness to the masses.

Food is life-giving and Black Bean Inspiration reminds us that our meals can be healthy AND delicious.

Besides finding yummy noms on Abby Marroquin’s blog, Black Bean Inspiration will also give you tips and tricks on how to food prep to get yourself right for healthy eating the easy way.

Comadre Wellness focuses on the wellness of comadres, families, and communities of color.

Sometimes wellness comes externally from the people who help us in life. The collective of comadres, mothers, and women who make up Comadre Wellness know this to be fact. With that in mind, they offer resources such as a Chicana Mother Networking blog and information on resources like Immigration rights. They also organize community events because everyone knows we Latinas draw strength — and wellness— from each other.

READ: 7 Latinas Share Their First Period Stories And They’re Backed With All The Jajajas

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Brazil Just Passed a Bill That Will Allow Rich Corporations to ‘Skip the Line’ for COVID-19 Vaccines

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Brazil Just Passed a Bill That Will Allow Rich Corporations to ‘Skip the Line’ for COVID-19 Vaccines

Photo via Getty Images

Currently, Brazil is one of the world’s epicenters of the coronavirus. In March 2021, Brazil saw 66,573 COVID-19-related deaths. That means 1 in every 3 COVID-related deaths worldwide are occuring in Brazil.

And it doesn’t appear that the numbers will be slowing down anytime soon. While the United States is making strides in their COVID-19 vaccine distribution, Brazil is lagging far behind. And things are about to get a lot more complicated.

On Tuesday, Brazil passed a bill that would allow corporations to buy up as many vaccines as they can get their hands on, and privately distribute them to their employees first.

Elected officials in Brazil are arguing that the country has become so desperate to vaccinate its citizens, that it doesn’t matter who gets the vaccines first at this point.

The country, once renowned for having one of the most robust and efficient public vaccine-distribution programs in the world, has failed to make strides towards getting their citizens vaccinated.

“We are at war,” said the leader of the chamber, Arthur Lira. “And in war, anything goes to save lives.” We don’t know about you, but usually when it comes to war, we’ve heard that soldiers prioritize the health and safety of young, the weak, and the elderly before their own? We digress…

Brazil’s plan to privatize the vaccine rollout has brought up moral and ethical questions.

From the beginning, the World Health Organization has asked countries to first prioritize essential health workers and then high-risk populations when distributing the vaccine.

Anything other than that would promote a pay-to-play schemes in which the rich could protect their lives before poor people could. And poor people are more likely to die from COVID-19 in the first place.

As Alison Buttenheim, behavioral scientist and expert on the equitable allocation of the COVID-19 vaccine said, vaccine distribution should not “exacerbate disparities and inequities in health care,” but instead address them. Brazil’s vaccine rollout plan would fail to do any of the above.

If countries begin to allow the rich to prioritize their own interests during the vaccine rollout, the consequences could be disastrous.

In a time when the world is stoked by fear and uncertainty, the worst thing that can happen is for rich companies to exacerbate inequalities by effectively choosing who lives or dies.

As the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization said at the beginning of the global vaccine rollout: “any distribution of vaccines should advance human well-being and honor global equity, national equity, reciprocity, and legitimacy.”

Poor Brazilians should not be left to fend for themselves against COVID-19 simply because they are poor.

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Mother And Teen Daughter Endured Ten Years Of Separation, A Dramatic Border, And A Covid Hospitalization To Be Together

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Mother And Teen Daughter Endured Ten Years Of Separation, A Dramatic Border, And A Covid Hospitalization To Be Together

Lucas Uebel / Getty

Separated from her mother for a decade, seventeen-year-old Cindy (who is only being identified by her first name) took a chance last month to see her. Despite her age, a raging pandemic, and the risks of crossing the Mexico–United States border she journeyed from Honduras to see her mother in New York. Her love for her mother was so deep, she was willing to risk everything.

In her mission, Cindy wound up in U.S. immigration facilities where she contracted Covid-19. After three days in a hospital bed in California, Cindy was finally able to contact her mother who had not learned of her daughter’s hospitalization.

Thanks to the help of a doctor who lent her their phone Cindy was able to make the call to her mother, Maria Ana.

“There are backlogs and delays in communication that are really unacceptable,” Maria Ana’s immigration lawyer Kate Goldfinch, who is also the president of the nonprofit Vecina, explained to NBC.

After learning about her daughter’s COVID-19 hospitalization, Maria Ana feared the worst. “Following weeks of anguish and uncertainty, Maria Ana spent most of her nights painting the bedroom she has fixed for Cindy, just ‘waiting for my girl,'” she explained to NBC.

Last Wednesday night, Maria Ana flew to San Diego to be with her daughter after she’d finally recovered from Covid.

At the emotional mother-daughter reunion, Maria Ana assured her daughter “no one else is going to hurt you.”

After Cindy crossed the border, she spent several days in a detention facility in Texas in the custody of Customs and Border Protection. According to NBC “On any given night, Cindy said, she would share two mattresses with about eight other girls. She could shower only every five days in one of the eight showers the facility had to serve 700 girls.”

“It was really bad,” Cindy told the outlet..

Cindy was among almost 13,350 unaccompanied children left in the care and custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement at HHS. This last year has seen over 3,715 unaccompanied children at these facilities diagnosed with Covid-19. Worse, there are currently 528 unaccompanied children who have tested positive for Covid-19 and put in medical isolation.

Now, immigration advocates and families are pressing the U.S. government to pick up reunions of children and their families in the United States. Over 80 percent of unaccompanied minors currently in federal custody have family living in the states. According to Goldfinch, “40 percent have parents in the U.S.”

“So we would think that it would be fairly quick and simple to release a child to their own parent. But because of the chaos of the system, the reunification of these kids with their parents is really frustrating and backlogged,” Goldfinch explained, “most frustrating, of course, for the actual children and their parents.”

While Cindy was in the custody of the Department of Health and Human Services, no one managed to notify Ana Maria that her daughter was in the hospital according to Goldfinch

“I don’t know why my daughter has to be suffering this way, because it’s not fair. It’s something very sad for me,” Maria Ana explained to NBC

“I’ve already been through a lot,” Cindy went onto share. “But I hope it’s all worth it.”

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