Culture

Guelaguetza, One Of LA’s Most Iconic Mexican Restaurants, Is Sharing Some Of Their Recipes On Instagram

So many companies are sharing their longheld secret recipes. Disney wants you to make their churros from home while Waffle House is showing us how to make their waffles. In Los Angeles, the iconic and important Guelaguetza is giving people a chance to recreate some Oaxacan classics in their own kitchens.

Guelaguetza has been serving Oaxacan food to Los Angeles since the 1990s.

Guelaguetza was one of the restaurants that famed LA food critic Jonathan Gold reviewed and put on the LA food map. Bricia Lopez, one of the children of the original restaurant owners, has kept the business running with her siblings. Now, they aren’t just running the restaurant. The family has diversified the company to bring the best tastes of Oaxaca right to your kitchen.

Recently, Bricia Lopez and Javier Cabral released “Oaxaca,” a cookbook celebrating the regionally specific dishes.

The cookbook was released in 2019 and gives homecooks a chance to create everything from Oaxacan Adobo to Frijol Blanco con Bacalao Capeado to Chiles Rellenos de Picadillo. Lopez’s family moved to Los Angeles from Oaxaca and her father was the one who decided to open a restaurant that offered Oaxacan food, not general Mexican food. Decades later, the restaurant is a James Beard-award winning institution of Los Angeles.

With so many people at home because of COVID-19, Lopez is sharing recipes from Guelaguetza and the cookbook.

Food is one of the most important things when it comes to cultural representation and identity. There is something transcendent about digging into your favorite dish that you abuela made you all the time growing up. Some foods do far more than nourish your body. They feed the soul and highlight your cultural awareness and pride.

You can learn how to make some Rojo Chicken Nachos.

View this post on Instagram

@bricialopez uploaded this video on her feed a couple of weeks ago and it has become our most replicated mole recipe yet! ⠀ ⠀ If you haven’t ordered your Mole yet, remember we ship ALL OVER THE COUNTRY! 📦 Simple visit : STORE.ILOVEMOLE.COM. ⠀ ⠀ We offer free shipping in orders over $50 ✈️ ⠀ ⠀ FULL RECIPE 👇🏽 :⠀ ⠀ INGREDIENTS:⁣⠀ 1 tsp vegetable oil ⁣⠀ ¼ cup diced onion⁣⠀ 1 tsp cumin⁣⠀ One 14 1/2-ounce can black beans, rinsed and drained ⁣⠀ 2 tablespoons mole paste⁣⠀ ¼ cup chicken broth⁣⠀ ½ teaspoon garlic flakes⁣⠀ Pinch salt⁣⠀ 2 chicken breasts, cooked and shredded⁣⠀ 1 large bag salted tortilla chips, about 14 oz⁣⠀ 24 ounces shredded cheese ⁣⠀ ¾ cup pico de gallo (homemade or store bought)⁣⠀ 1/4 cup Mexican crema⁣⠀ 1 or 2 ripe avocados, cubed⁣ ⠀ ⁣⠀ INSTRUCTIONS:⁣⠀ 1️⃣Preheat oven to 325° F.⁣⠀ Heat a pan over medium heat and heat oil. Saute onions and cumin for 5 minutes until fragrant and translucent. ⁣⠀ ⁣⠀ 2️⃣Add beans. Stir for 5 more minutes and add vegetable broth, garlic flakes and mole paste. Stir mole paste until it’s fully dissolved. ⁣⠀ ⁣⠀ 3️⃣Add shredded chicken and stir to combine. Remove from flames. ⁣⠀ ⁣⠀ 4️⃣On a medium baking pan with a high lip (or another oven-proof casserole dish), spread out a serious layer of tortilla chips. Next, evenly spread half of the chicken and beans mixture over the chips, and then half of the cheese. ⁣⠀ ⁣⠀ 5️⃣Repeat with another layer of chips, the rest of the chicken and beans, and then the remaining cheese.⁣⠀ ⁣⠀ 6️⃣Bake nachos in the oven for about 10 minutes, or until both layers of cheese are melted.⁣⠀ ⁣⠀ 7️⃣Remove nachos from oven and sprinkle with pico de gallo and cubed avocado.⁣⠀ You can also serve it with a side of guacamole.⁣⠀

A post shared by Guelaguetza (@laguelaguetza) on

The recipe uses some of Guelaguetza’s mole, which you can purchase online from the restaurant’s store. This is also a nice chance for people to really give their kitchen some love and attention. Who hasn’t wanted to find a new recipe to learn during this time? Nachos are always a crowd-pleaser and surely these will be a hit with you and anyone you are currently isolating with.

Lopez also shows us how to make some delicious Mole Enchiladas.

There is so much you can do with mole and Lopez wants to show everyone what a little mole can do. Everyone is trying to find ways to save their money and make their food last. One tip Lopez offered in a recipe is that you can save the leftovers of any mole meat you make to create chilaquiles the next morning for breakfast.

Guelaguetza has done more than offer recipes. They have stood with their employees.

The family has made sure that the people who make Guelaguetza the food destination that is are being taken care of at this time. This means that La Guelguetza’s family has delivered grocery kits and has stayed open for curbside pick up fo family meals to give their employees a source of income while mortgages and rents are still due.

If you live in the LA area and want to order some food from Guelaguetza, they are offering curbside family meal pick up Thursday to Sunday.

Supporting your local businesses is one way you can help to keep your local economy going during this unprecedented shutdown. We are all in this together and we will make it through this time.

READ: This Is How This Mexican Mom From Oaxaca Is Running Successful Mole And Michelada Businesses

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Mexican Politician Accused Of Rape Vows To Block Elections Unless He’s Allowed To Run

Things That Matter

Mexican Politician Accused Of Rape Vows To Block Elections Unless He’s Allowed To Run

FRANCISCO ROBLES/AFP via Getty Images

It’s an election year in Mexico and that means that things are heating up as candidates fight for the top spot. At the same time, Mexico is experiencing a burgeoning fight for women’s rights that demands accountability and justice. Despite all the marches and protests and civil disobedience by hundreds of thousands of Mexicans, it remains to be seen how much change will happen and when. 

Case in point: Félix Salgado, a candidate for governor of Guerrero who has been accused of rape and sexual assault but maintains the support of President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO). Now, after being disqualified from the race because of undisclosed campaign finances, the candidate is vowing to block any elections from taking place unless he is allowed to continue his campaign. 

A disqualified candidate is vowing to block elections unless he’s allowed to run.

Félix Salgado was running to be governor of the Mexican state of Guerrero when he was faced with allegations of rape and sexual assault. The commission that selects party candidates allowed him to remain in the race and he continues to maintain the support of President AMLO – who is of the same political party, Morena. 

However, in late March, election regulators ordered that Salgado be taken off the ballot due to a failure to report campaign spending, according to the AP. Mexico’s electoral court ordered the Federal Electoral Institute (FEI) to reconsider their decision last week. Salgado is already threatening to throw the election process into chaos.

“If we are on the ballot, there will be elections,” Salgado told supporters in Guerrero after leading a caravan of protestors to the FEI’s office in Mexico City on Sunday. “If we are not on the ballot, there will not be any elections,” Salgado said.

The AP notes that Salgado is not making an empty threat. Guerrero is an embattled state overrun with violence and drug gangs and many elections have been previously disrupted. Past governors have been forced out of office before finishing their terms. Salgado was previously filmed getting into a confrontation with police in 2000.

It was just weeks ago that the ruling party allowed Salgado’s candidacy to move forward.

In mid-March, Morena confirmed that Félix Salgado would be its candidate for governor in Guerrero after completing a new selection process in which the former senator was reportedly pitted against four women.

Morena polled citizens in Guerrero last weekend to determine levels of support for five different possible candidates, according to media reports. Among the four women who were included in the process were Acapulco Mayor Adela Román and Senator Nestora Salgado.

Félix Salgado was the clear winner of the survey, even coming out on top when those polled were asked to opine on the potential candidates’ respect for the rights of women. He also prevailed in all other categories including honesty and knowledge of the municipality in which the poll respondents lived.

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

PEDRO PARDO/AFP via Getty Images

Mexico City is the oldest surviving capital city in all of the Americas. It also is one of only two that actually served as capitals of their Indigenous communities – the other being Quito, Ecuador. But much of that incredible history is washed over in history books, tourism advertisements, and the everyday hustle and bustle of a city of 21 million people.

Recently, city residents voted on a non-binding resolution that could see the city’s name changed back to it’s pre-Hispanic origin to help shine a light on its rich Indigenous history.

Mexico City could soon be renamed in honor of its pre-Hispanic identity.

A recent poll shows that 54% of chilangos (as residents of Mexico City are called) are in favor of changing the city’s official name from Ciudad de México to México-Tenochtitlán. In contrast, 42% of respondents said they didn’t support a name change while 4% said they they didn’t know.

Conducted earlier this month as Mexico City gears up to mark the 500th anniversary of the fall of the Aztec empire capital with a series of cultural events, the poll also asked respondents if they identified more as Mexicas, as Aztec people were also known, Spanish or mestizo (mixed indigenous and Spanish blood).

Mestizo was the most popular response, with 55% of respondents saying they identified as such while 37% saw themselves more as Mexicas. Only 4% identified as Spaniards and the same percentage said they didn’t know with whom they identified most.

The poll also touched on the city’s history.

The ancient city of Tenochtitlán.

The same poll also asked people if they thought that the 500th anniversary of the Spanish conquest of Tenochtitlán by Spanish conquistadoresshould be commemorated or forgotten, 80% chose the former option while just 16% opted for the latter.

Three-quarters of respondents said they preferred areas of the the capital where colonial-era architecture predominates, such as the historic center, while 24% said that they favored zones with modern architecture.

There are also numerous examples of pre-Hispanic architecture in Mexico City including the Templo Mayor, Tlatelolco and Cuicuilco archaeological sites.

Tenochtitlán was one of the world’s most advanced cities when the Spanish arrived.

Tenochtitlán, which means “place where prickly pears abound” in Náhuatl, was founded by the Mexica people in 1325 on an island located on Lake Texcoco. The legend goes that they decided to build a city on the island because they saw the omen they were seeking: an eagle devouring a snake while perched on a nopal.

At its peak, it was the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. It subsequently became a cabecera of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. Today, the ruins of Tenochtitlán are in the historic center of the Mexican capital. The World Heritage Site of Xochimilco contains what remains of the geography (water, boats, floating gardens) of the Mexica capital.

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