Culture

11 Delicious Latin American Desserts You Can Totally DIY

All countries have their own culinary traditions and they all enjoy their version of a sweet treat. Latin America is no different and the area boasts some of the best and sweetest desserts in the world, which is no surprise since so much of the world’s cane sugar is grown in the region. Caramel also stars in many of the desserts that are popular in Latin America. With so much going for it, it’s no surprise that dessert reigns in most parts of the area. One of the region’s most revered ingredients is cajeta, which is caramel made from goat’s milk. Other parts of the region love using dulce de leche, which means “milk candy.” Latin America is a pretty large place and the desserts tend to vary a bit depending on whether you’re in Brazil, Argentina or Uruguay, but one thing they all have in common is a mouthwatering deliciousness that will always send you back for seconds.

1. Brigadeiro

Credit: @mirandaquitutes / Instagram

This is a traditional Latin American dessert that you’ll find primarily in Brazil. It was created in 1940 and consists of a delightful blend of condensed milk, cocoa powder and butter. To top things off, this sweet treat is then covered in chocolate sprinkles. Brigadeiros can be enjoyed hot, warm or cold. There are several variations that can change up the flavor, including pistachio, coconut, strawberry and peanut butter.

Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk
Credit: @culinariacriativa_ / Instagram

Directions:

1. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine cocoa, butter and condensed milk. Cook, stirring, until thickened, about 10 minutes.

2. Remove from heat and let rest until cool enough to handle. Form into small balls and eat at once or chill until serving.

Source: All Recipes

2. Churros

 Credit: @ildiariodiale / Instagram

These delicious pieces of fried dough is often dusted with cinnamon and sugar and served with warm melted chocolate for dipping. Most experts will say that the dessert originated in Spain and Portugal, but made its way to Latin America with immigrants where they are often filled with dulce de leche or cajetaIn some parts of Latin America, you can also find them glazed.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup butter or margarine
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3 eggs, beaten
  • Vegetable oil, for frying
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon, optional
Credit: Instagram
Chocolate for dunking:
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 2 cups milk
  • 4 ounces dark chocolate, chopped
  • 1/4 cup sugar

Directions:

  1. To make the churro dough: Combine 1 cup of water with the butter or margarine and the salt in a saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Using a wooden spoon, stir in flour. Reduce the heat to low and stir vigorously until the mixture forms a ball, about 1 minute. Remove the dough from the heat and, while stirring constantly, gradually beat the eggs into the dough.
  2. To make the chocolate for dunking: In a small bowl, dissolve the cornstarch in 1 cup of milk and reserve. Combine the chocolate with the remaining cup of milk in a saucepan. Stirring constantly, melt the chocolate over medium-low heat. Whisk the sugar and the dissolved cornstarch into the melted chocolate mixture. Reduce the heat to low and cook, whisking constantly, until the chocolate is thickened, about 5 minutes. (Add extra cornstarch if it doesn’t start to thicken after 5 minutes.) Remove the pan from the heat and whisk until smooth then reserve in a warm place.
  3. Heat about 2 inches of oil in a heavy, high-sided pot over medium-high heat until the oil reaches 360 degrees F. Mix the sugar with the cinnamon on a plate and reserve.
  4. Meanwhile, spoon the churro dough into a pastry bag fitted with a large tip. Squeeze a 4- inch strip of dough into the hot oil. Repeat, frying 3 or 4 strips at a time. Fry the churros, turning them once, until golden brown, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer the cooked churros to a plate lined with paper towels to drain.
  5. When the churros are just cool enough to handle, roll them in the cinnamon-sugar (in Spain churros are simply rolled in sugar.)
  6. Pour the chocolate into individual bowls or cups. Serve the warm churros with the chocolate dip.

3. Flan

Credit: @arte_culinario / Instagram

Latin American flan is a dense and creamy custard dessert that usually has a smooth, silky texture. It’s most often served in a rich caramel sauce. It’s made with sweetened condensed milk, as is customary with many Latin American desserts. Some people liken it cheesecake, while others say it closely resembled pudding. Either way, the texture and flavor are perfect for each other.

Ingredients:

  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • 2 large eggs plus 5 yolks
  • 1 (14-oz) can sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 (12-oz) can evaporated milk
  • ½ cup whole milk (half-and-half or 2% milk may be substituted but do not use skim milk)
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon Bourbon (see note)
  • ½ teaspoon salt

Credit: @frambuesaycaramelo / Instagram

Directions:

  1. (This recipe should be made at least one day before serving.) Adjust a rack to the middle position and preheat the oven to 300°F.
  2. Stir together the sugar and 1/4 cup water in a medium heavy saucepan until the sugar is completely moistened. Bring to boil over medium-high heat and cook, without stirring, until the mixture begins to turn golden. Gently swirling the pan, continue to cook until sugar is a honey color. Remove from the heat and swirl the pan until the sugar is reddish-amber and fragrant, 15 to 20 seconds. Carefully swirl in 2 tablespoons of warm tap water until incorporated – be careful as the mixture will bubble and steam. This whole process should take less than 10 minutes.
  3. Pour the caramel into an 8½ x 4½-inch loaf pan; do not scrape out the saucepan. Set the loaf pan aside. (To clean the hardened caramel from the saucepan, fill the pan with water and bring it to a boil.)
  4. Whisk the eggs and yolks in large bowl until combined. Add the sweetened condensed milk, evaporated milk, whole milk, vanilla, Bourbon, and salt and whisk until incorporated. Strain the mixture through a fine-mesh strainer into a large bowl to remove any bits of egg; then pour the strained custard into the loaf pan over the caramel.
  5. Place the loaf pan in the center of a 9×13-inch baking or roasting pan (preferably with high sides) to make a water bath. Place the nested pans in the oven; then, using a tea kettle or pitcher, pour hot water around the loaf pan until it reaches about halfway up the sides of the loaf pan. Bake for 75 – 90 minutes, until the custard is set around the edges but still a bit jiggly in the center. (Don’t worry that it seems undercooked. The custard will continue to cook as it cools, and the center will set completely — I promise!) Carefully remove the pans from the oven and leave the flan in the water bath for 1 hour to cool.
  6. Remove the loaf pan from the water bath and wipe the pan dry. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and chill in the fridge overnight or up to 4 days.
  7. To unmold the flan, carefully slide a sharp knife around the edges of the pan. Invert a platter with a raised rim (to contain the liquid caramel) on top of the flan and turn the pan and platter over. If the flan doesn’t release immediately, let it sit inverted for a minute and it should slide out. When the flan is released, remove the loaf pan. Using rubber spatula, scrape the residual caramel onto the platter. You won’t be able to release all of the caramel – that’s okay. Slice the flan and spoon the sauce over individual portions. (Leftover flan may be covered loosely with plastic wrap and refrigerated.)
  8. Note: If you would like to omit the Bourbon, replace with an additional 2 teaspoons of vanilla extract.

Source: Once Upon A Chef

4. Helado

Credit: @dennis_veloz_ec / Instagram

Helado hails from Argentina and is similar to gelato. The traditional flavors are dulce de leche or chocolate, but there are many others to choose from too, including sweet wine and various fruit flavors. In Argentina, people often have their helado delivered, but you’ll also find a shop selling helado on virtually every street corner too.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup of diced strawberries
  • 1 cup of diced mango
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract
Credit: @daiana_ok / Instagram

Directions:

  1. Puree fruit: Puree strawberries with a food processor or a stick blender. Set aside. Mix mango and vanilla extract and with a food processor or a stick blender. Set aside.
  2. Making jars: Pour two tablespoons of strawberry puree in a small glass jar. Cover with mango puree. Continue layering until you reach the top. Freeze until it’s mostly hard. Serve immediately.

Source: Dominican Cooking

5. Dulce de Guayaba

Credit: @comopreparar / Instagram

If you like fruity desserts or you’re in love with a cheese tray, you’re in luck when it comes to dulce de guaybaya. This fantastic creation hails from Paraguay and is surprisingly easy to make. It’s basically just a guava gel, topped with a chunk of hard white cheese. It’s unlike anything you’ve ever had, but you won’t be sorry you gave it a try!

Ingredients:

  • 8 ripe guavas
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 1 quart of water (more if necessary)
  • 1 cup of brown sugar
Credit: @andypipoka / Instagram

Directions:

  1. Wash and peel the guavas. Cut into halves and scoop out the seeds.
  2. In a thick-bottomed pot boil the seeds and the cinnamon sticks in 1 quart [1lt] of water over low heat until the seeds separate and the water is dark. Add more water if it becomes necessary to maintain the same level.
  3. Strain the liquid and eliminate the seeds and cinnamon. Return this liquid to the pot, along with the sugar and guava halves.
  4. Boil until the guava becomes very soft, and the liquid has reduced to about one cup. Cool to room temperature.
  5. Blend the guava and the liquid left from boiling. Return to the pot, cook over medium heat stirring the pot so it doesn’t stick to the bottom or burn. Be careful with splatters!
  6. To make sauce, stop it when it has thickened enough to drizzle. To make it into spreadable jam, stop when it has thickened to the consistency of yoghurt. To make into candy cubes, wait until the paste starts lifting from the bottom, and pour it into an oiled small square mold and let it cool to room temperature. Cut into cubes.

Source: Dominican Cooking

6. Picarones

Credit: @casadeoficios / Instagram

Native to Peru, picarones are a unique blend of tastes that closely resemble a cross between pumpkin pie and doughnut. They’re made from sweet potatoes and squash, and then seasoned with anise, sugar and then deep fried like a doughnut. They are served with a homemade sugar sauce, similar to molasses.

Ingredients:

  • 1pound sweet potatoes
  • 1pound pumpkin
  • 2 teaspoons aniseed
  • 1 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 ¾ tablespoons active dry yeast
  • 1pound all-purpose flour
  • Vegetable oil for frying
  • 4 cups chancaca syrup
  • For the syrup:
  • 2 chancaca pieces
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 6 cloves, 1 fig leaf
  • 2 star anise
  • pineapple peels
  • 1 orange, whole
Credit: @peruanospuntope / Instagram

Directions:

  1. Peel the sweet potatoes and cut in medium sized squares. Peel and chop the pumpkin. Put in a heavy saucepan with the aniseed, add water to cover, and cook over medium-high heat until soft. Drain, reserving the water, and process in the food processor or mash the sweet potatoes and pumpkin to form a soft puree.
  2. Cool the water to lukewarm. In a bowl put one cup cooking water and the sugar; add the active dry yeast, stirring until dissolved. Cover and let rest for 10 minutes in a warm place, until it forms a sponge.
  3. Put the potato and pumpkin puree in a large bowl; add the activated yeast. Add the flour, and mixing with your hands add ½ cup of the cooking water, until the dough is no longer sticky, and feels soft and silky. Cover with a kitchen towel and let rest in a warm and quiet place, until double or triple in volume, at least two hours.
  4. When the dough is ready, heat a good amount of oil in a big saucepan to deep-fry the picarones.
  5. This is a fundamental step and requires skill and training. With practice, you will get there. Have a bowl with cold water nearby; with one wet hand, take a portion of dough, and quickly try to make a ring shape with your thumb while you put it in the hot oil. With a long wooden stick, turn the picarones around (you can use a kitchen fork to do this). Serve drenched with syrup.
  6. For the syrup:
  7. Chop chancaca and put in a saucepan with cinnamon sticks, cloves, fig leaf, star anise, pineapple peels, and orange. Cover with water and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally until the chancaca is dissolved and forms a thick syrup. Strain discarding the solids, cool to room temperature, and put in a jar to have it ready to pour over picarones. You can substitute chancaca with molasses syrup or muscovado sugar.

Source: Perude Lights

7. Dulce de Tres Leches

Credit: @sweetnsalt_ec / Instagram

Made with three kinds of milk and stacked into four delectable layers, dulce de tres leches cake is a soft and spongy masterpiece. It has an incredible caramel flavor that pairs well with the different types of milk and it’s often topped with whipped cream. It’s popular throughout Latin America, but its origins are likely from Nicaragua.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 6 large eggs, separated
  • 1 cup sugar
  • One 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk
  • One 12-ounce can whole evaporated milk
  • 1 1/2 cups heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup light rum
  • Dulce de leche
Credit: @thebakeryside / Instagram

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 325°. Butter a 9-inch square baking pan. In a medium bowl, whisk the flour with the baking powder. In a large bowl, using a handheld electric mixer, beat the egg whites at medium-high speed until stiff peaks form. In another large bowl, beat the egg yolks with the sugar at medium speed until pale and thick, about 3 minutes. Beat the egg whites and the dry ingredients into the egg yolk mixture until smooth.
  2. Scrape the batter into the prepared pan and bake in the center of the oven for 30 minutes, until golden and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Let the cake cool in the pan for 15 minutes, then invert onto a wire rack to cool completely.
  3. In a 13-by-9-inch baking dish, whisk the condensed milk with the evaporated milk, heavy cream and rum. Cut the cake into 3-inch squares and add them to the baking dish, turning gently once or twice. Tilt the dish and spoon the liquid over the squares until well-soaked, about 5 minutes. Pour off all but a thin layer of the liquid and reserve for another use. Cover and refrigerate the cakes overnight.
  4. Carefully transfer the squares to plates. Drizzle with the Dulce de Leche and serve.

Source: Food and Wine

8. Espumillas

Credit: @lanegritasv / Instagram

Hailing from Ecuador, espumillas are meringues served in ice cream cones and can be found sold on the street throughout most cities. The name translates to “little foam” and the dessert is popular among children and it’s often served with blackberry syrup.

Ingredients:

  • 8 ripe guavas or guayabas – if you can’t find fresh guavas you can get them frozen in Latin grocery stores and defrost them
  • 1 – 1 ½ cups sugar, adjust based on your preference, you can start with 1 cup and then taste and add more if needed
  • 2 egg whites
  • Garnishes: Arrope or berry syrup, sprinkles and/or coconut flakes
Credit: @fromnicaragua / Instagram

Directions:

  1. Peel the guavas -they should be very soft and ripe- with a vegetable peeler. Remove the seeds and just keep the meaty flesh parts. Put the guava pieces in a large bowl and mix it with sugar until everything is pureed. You can use a fork or a vegetable masher for this part.
  2. The alternative method is to cut the guavas in halves, place them in the blender (no water), and blend until you have a puree. Then strain the puree and use an electric blender to mix in the sugar.
  3. Add the egg whites to the guava and sugar puree, mix using the electric mixer until you have stiff creamy texture. As mentioned the texture will be coarser if you made the guava puree by hand and smoother if it was done in the blender.
  4. Serve immediately in ice cream bowls or ice cream cones, drizzle with the arrope or berry sauce and sprinkles or coconut flakes.

Source: Laylita

9. Torta De Mil Hojas

Credit: @madrina.gastronomia / Instagram

This huge dessert is commonly served in Chile and is a cake made from a multitude of layers. Sometimes called the “thousand layer cake,” it’s a towering creation (though not really 1,000 layers) that combines crispy layers of puff pastry with a gooey caramel and milky filling. The cake is then covered in frosting and served. Some people like to scatter the frosting with nuts for a great dose of added flavor and crunch.

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups sifted flour
  • 250 grams/ 8 oz unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 3 egg yolk, room temperature
  • ¾ cup milk
  • 1 tablespoon rum or pisco
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • 3 cups of dulce de leche or caramel (available in Latin supermarkets, I like La Lechera brand sold in cans, usually right next to the condensed milk)
  • 2 1/2 cup chopped walnuts
  • ¼ cup powdered sugar
Credit: @flip_in_philly / Instagram

Directions:

  1. Combine the flour and salt in a big bowl. Add butter in chunks, egg yolks, milk and liquor, work to form a dough of medium consistency. Do not work with your hands, use a fork or 2 knives or a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, the important thing is not to use your hands because the body heat will melt the butter and bits of butter remaining in the dough are what gives the crispness to the dough. Wrap in plastic wrap and let stand in the fridge overnight or at least 6 hours.
  2. Preheat oven to 350F or 180C.
  3. Divide the dough into 14 equal portions. Roll each piece on a floured counter until very thin, using a paring knife cut circles of 9″ of diameter, I usually use a cake pan as a guide, pierced the circle of dough with a fork in almost the entire surface and bake for 5-7 minutes until golden, let cool.
  4. Assemble the cake filling in between each layer with dulce de leche, every three layers add ground walnuts also, saved 1 cup for decoration purpose. Cover the whole cake with a thin layer of dulce de leche and sprinkle with a mixture of walnuts, powdered sugar, and crumbs.
  5. Let it rest well cover in the fridge and serve at room temperature.

Source: En Mi Cocina Hoy

10. Tawa Tawas

Credit: Instagram@wysmakowane.pl

Tawa tawas are deep fried dough and are popular throughout Bolivia. They’re easy to make and have such a heavenly flavor and texture that they’ll easily be your new favorite dessert. Similar to a sopapilla, tawa tawas are usually served dusted with powdered sugar and with honey for dipping.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup water or milk
  • 2 cups butter or oil to fry
  • 1 cup cane honey
Credit: @katharos.mk / Instagram

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl, sift flour, baking powder, and salt. Then, add butter and mix well.
  2. Add the eggs, slightly beaten. Then add water or milk, little by little, and mixing very well until getting a smooth dough.
  3. Place the dough on a table, slightly sprinkled with flour, and knead it. Let it rest for ten minutes, covered with a dish cloth or towel.
  4. On the table, place half the dough and stretch it out until it becomes very thin (about a tenth of an inch). Cut the dough into small rhombus-shaped pieces, 11/2 wide. Then cover them with a cloth. Repeat the process with the remaining half of dough.
  5. In a large pan, heat oil at a high temperature. Fry several pieces simultaneously. Once they are golden on one side, turn them over until they are golden on the other side too.
  6. Remove the tawa-tawas from the frying pan, drain them and place them on a paper sheet to absorb oil. Finally, place them in tray and pour cane honey over them. If wanted, sprinkle with fine sugar too.

Source: Bolivia Web

11. Platanos Calados

Credit: @dannabanana123 / Instagram

This dessert might be simple, but it’s packed with flavor and allows a Latin American staple — the plantain — to shine. It’s also a great use for very ripe plantains, which are sugar, water, cloves, cinnamon and lemon juice and simmered. The result is a sweet and spicy dessert that is great on its own, but is often served with a soft white cheese.

Ingredients:

  • 2 large very ripe plantains, peeled and cut into 4 chunks each one
  • ½ cup light brown sugar or grated panela
  • 1 cup of water
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • ½ tablespoon butter
Credit: @nutrirenatachequer / Instagram

Directions:

  1. In a small pot place all the ingredients, cover and cook over medium heat for 15 to 20 minutes.
  2. Transfer to a serving plate and serve with white cheese.

Source: My Colombian Recipes

Does Anybody Really Know What’s Supposed To Happen After You Get The Baby Jesus Figurine In La Rosca De Reyes?

Culture

Does Anybody Really Know What’s Supposed To Happen After You Get The Baby Jesus Figurine In La Rosca De Reyes?

alejandro.munoz.p / Instagram

Remember Día de Reyes when everyone cuts the rosca and hopes to god not to get the little niño Jesus? If you grew up Mexican, you probably know that whoever gets the baby Jesus figurine owes everyone tamales. But when is the tamal party? And most importantly—why? Keep reading to find out what El Día de la Candelaria means, what your abuelitas and tías are actually celebrating and how it originated —spoiler alert: it’s colonization.

February 2nd may be Groundhog Day in the United States, but in Mexico, and for many Latinos outside of Mexico, there is a completely different celebration on this date.

The religious holiday is known as Día de la Candelaria (or Candlemas in English). And on this day of the year, people get together with family and friends to eat tamales, as a continuation of the festivities of Three Kings’ Day on January 6. 

This is why your abuelita dresses up her niño Jesús in extravagant outfits.

For Día de la Candelaria it’s customary for celebrants to dress up figures of the Christ Child in special outfits and take them to the church to be blessed. Día de la Candelaria is traditionally a religious and family celebration, but in some places, such as Tlacotalpan, in the state of Veracruz, it is a major fiesta with fairs and parades.

February 2nd is exactly forty days after Christmas and is celebrated by the Catholic church as the Feast of the Purification of the Virgin.

Alternatively, this day also counts as the Presentation of Jesus at the Temple. The origin of this religious feast day comes from ancient Jewish tradition. According to Jewish law, a woman was considered unclean for 40 days after giving birth, and it was customary to bring a baby to the temple after that period of time had passed. So the idea is that Mary and Joseph would have taken Jesus to the temple to be blessed on February second, forty days after his birth on December 25.

The tradition goes back to around the 11th Century in Europe.

People typically took candles to the church to be blessed as part of the celebration. This tradition was based on the biblical passage of Luke 2:22-39 which recounts how when Mary and Joseph took Jesus to the temple, a particularly devout man named Simeon embraced the child and prayed the Canticle of Simeon: “Now thou dost dismiss thy servant, O Lord, according to thy word in peace; Because my eyes have seen thy salvation, Which thou hast prepared before the face of all peoples: A light to the revelation of the Gentiles, and the glory of thy people Israel.” The reference to the light inspired the celebration of the blessing of the candles.

In Mexico Día de la Candelaria is a follow-up to the festivities of Three Kings Day on January 6th.

On Día De Reyes, when children receive gifts, families and friends gather together to eat Rosca de Reyes, a special sweet bread with figurines of a baby (representing the Child Jesus) hidden inside. The person (or people) who received the figurines on Three Kings Day are supposed to host the party on Candlemas Day. Tamales are the food of choice.

This tradition also carries Pre-Hispanic roots.

After the Spanish conquistadors introduced the Catholic religion and masked indigenous traditions with their own, to help spread evangelization, many villagers picked up the tradition of taking their corn to the church in order to get their crops blessed after planting their seeds for the new agricultural cycle that was starting. They did this on February 2, which was the eleventh day of the first month on the Aztec calendar —which coincidentally fell on the same day as the Candelaria celebration. It’s believed that this is why, to this day, the celebratory feast on February 2 is all corn-based —atole and tamales.

This date is special for other reasons too… 

February 2, marks the halfway point between the winter solstice and the spring equinox, which aligns with the pagan holiday of Imbolc. Since ancient times, this date was thought to be a marker or predictor of the weather to come, which is why it is also celebrated as Groundhog Day in the United States. There was an old English saying that went “if Candlemas be fair and bright, Winter has another flight. If Candlemas brings clouds and rain, Winter will not come again.” In many places, this is traditionally seen as the best time to prepare the earth for spring planting.

In Perú the Fiesta de la Candelaria is a festival in honor of the Virgin of Candelaria, patron saint of the city of Puno and it is one of the biggest festivals of culture, music, and dancing in the country.

The huge festival brings together the Catholic faith and Andean religion in homage to the Virgin of Candelaria. The Virgin represents fertility and purity. She is the patron saint of the city and is strongly associated with the Andean deity of ‘Pachamama’ (‘mother earth’). It is this common factor of both religions that brings them together for the festival. In 2014, UNESCO declared the festival an Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. The main dates of ‘Fiesta de la Candelaria’ are February 2nd – 12th.

El Chapo’s Daughter Is Using His Name And Face to Launch A Beer Brand After She Launched A Fashion Line

Culture

El Chapo’s Daughter Is Using His Name And Face to Launch A Beer Brand After She Launched A Fashion Line

elchapo701 / Instagram

It seems like everybody today is trying to get in on the alcohol business. Whether it’s The Rock with a new tequila brand or Ryan Reynolds buying a gin company, it seems to be all the rage right now that even “El Chapo” is getting his own line of beers. 

Say hello to the “El Chapo 701” brand run by Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman’s daughter Alejandrina Guzman Salazar, who also is behind a fashion and lifestyle company built around her jailed father’s brand. The new line of beer, called El Chapo Mexican Lager, was unveiled for the first time to the public on Jan. 14 at a fashion trade show in Guadalajara, Mexico. 

“It hasn’t been released for sale to the public yet. I just brought some to display,” spokeswoman Adriana Ituarte told AFP, as the beer line is currently still waiting on government approval to sell beer in Mexico. The alcohol displayed at the trade showed brown, black and white labeled craft beer bottles with the Sinaloa cartel leader’s infamous mustache face adorned on them. 

Alejandrina Guzman Salazar’s company is banking on the idea that people will want to buy craft beer, labeled and named after her infamous father, at bars and markets in Mexico. 

Beer lovers won’t have to break the bank either when it comes to purchasing the new line of beer which comes in at 70.10 pesos, or about $3.73, for a 355 ml bottle. There is also the name of the brand, “El Chapo 701” which has an interesting meaning behind it. The “701” is a reference to El Chapo’s place on the 2009 list of the world’s richest persons from Forbes magazine (estimated at $1 billion). 

The “El Chapo” beer is expected to have a large fan base due to the notoriety of the imprisoned drug cartel leader and a growing market for collectible celebrity alcoholic beverages like these. The company is hoping that, besides just the name and branding of the beer, fans will actually enjoy the drink and keep coming back to it.

“I don’t know if we take the label off and the beer is good if it’s going to sell,’  Ituarte told the Daily Mail. “But obviously the brand gives the plus of sale, we continue with the idea that we are selling and as long as the product is good, people buy it and like it.”

Ituarte said at the trade show that the product will be sold at bars throughout Mexico that also sell stock craft beer, a market that has flourished in Mexico City in recent years due to the growth of microbreweries. The lager was produced by La Chingonería, a Mexico City-based brewery company. 

“This is an artisanal beer, with 4 percent alcohol. This prototype is a lager, and it’s made up of malt, rice, and honey so it’s good,” Ituarte told Daily Mail. “And the idea is for it to be sold at bars that stock craft beer.”

This is not the first time that “El Chapo” has seen his name being cashed in on by his family. There has been a clothing and accessories line made in tribute of Guzman.

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@granexpoventa @lalalaladyboss701 @tulum

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Salazar’s company has already cashed in on her father’s name with a line of T items such as t-shirts, belts, purses, and jackets all adorned with imagery of Guzman and the 701 logo. The brand has been quite successful in under a year of going public which shows the power of “El Chapo’s” name. 

Salazar isn’t the only one getting in on the drug lord’s name. Last March Guzmán’s wife, Emma Coronel, launched a fashion and leisurewear line, licensed by her husband. “I’m very excited to start this project, which was based on ideas and concepts that my husband and I had years ago,” Coronel told CNN in a statement at the time of the launch. “It is a project dedicated to our daughters.”

These dedicated “El Chapo” brands show the notoriety and the power of his name when it comes to marketing. If this new beer line is anything like the clothing and accessories already released under his name, there is sure to be a market for this too. 

Guzman is currently serving a life sentence at a supermax prison in Colorado after being convicted on drug trafficking and weapons charges in 2019. El Chapo was forced to forfeit $12.6 billion as part of his punishment.

READ: California Man Is Using His Culture To Create Hilarious And Super Relevant Mexican Greet Cards