Culture

Disney’s Gift That Keeps On Giving Is More Of Its Classic Recipes So That We Can Have Them In Quarantine

Updated May 20, 2020.

It’s definitely a marketing ploy and it probably won’t be the same as the real deal, but sí mi gente, some of your favorite dine-out recipes have been shared online!

That’s right, so many of their customers sheltering in place across the globe in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, some of the biggest hospitality brands in the game are releasing their signature recipes. We’ve put them all here in one place for you to check out!

Canadian Cheddar Cheese Soup from EPCOT

Ingredients:

1/2 pound of bacon, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 medium red onion, cut into 1/4-inch pieces
3 celery ribs, cut into 1/4-inch pieces
4 tablespoons butter
1 cup all-purpose flour
3 cups chicken stock
4 cups of milk
1 pound white cheddar cheese, grated
1 tablespoon Tabasco sauce
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
Coarse salt, freshly ground pepper to taste
1/2 cup warm Canadian golden lager or any pale lager-style beer
Chopped scallions or chives, for garnish

Recipe:

“In a 4- or 5-quart Dutch oven, cook bacon, stirring, over medium heat for about 5 minutes, or until lightly browned. Add red onion, celery, and butter and sauté until onion has softened, about 5 minutes. Add flour and cook, stirring constantly, for about 4 minutes over medium heat.  Whisk in chicken stock and bring to boil for 1 minute. Reduce heat to simmer and cook for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add milk and continue to simmer for 15 minutes. Do not boil after milk is added. Remove from heat and add cheese, Tabasco sauce, Worcestershire sauce, salt, and pepper. Blend with immersion blender until cheese is melted and soup is smooth. Stir in warm beer.  If the soup is too thick, thin with some warm milk. Serve the soup hot, garnished with chopped scallions or chives.”

The Grey Stuff

Disney Parks / Youtube

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups cold whole milk
  • 1 (3.4 ounce) package instant vanilla pudding mix
  • 15 chocolate sandwich cookies
  • 1 (8 ounce) container whipped topping, thawed
  • 3 tablespoons instant chocolate pudding mix
  • 12 scalloped sugar cookies
  • Edible sugar pearls

Recipe

“Pour milk into large mixing bowl. Add instant vanilla pudding mix and whisk for 2 minutes until smooth and slightly thickened. Place in the refrigerator for 1-2 hours, until firm. Place chocolate sandwich cookies in food processor and pulse until puréed. Fold puréed cookies into pudding mix. Stir until fully mixed. Add whipped topping and instant chocolate pudding. Stir until fully mixed. Place in refrigerator and chill for one hour. Spoon grey stuff into piping bag fitted with desired tip. Pipe grey stuff onto cookies. Top with sugar pearls.”

The Peanut Butter & Jelly Milk Shake from 50’s Prime Time Café at Disney’s Hollywood Studios

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons peanut butter
  • 2 tablespoons jelly (strawberry or grape)
  • 2 cups vanilla ice cream
  • 1/4 cup milk

Recipe:

“Add all of the ingredients to a blender and blend until smooth.Add plenty of extra peanut butter or jelly to taste.”

Disney’s Cook’s Notes: You can substitute jelly for two cups of sliced strawberries

Tonga Toast at Disney’s Polynesian Village Resort

Ingredients: 

  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon 
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 1/3 cup whole milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon granulated sugar 
  • 1 quart canola oil, for frying
  • 1 loaf sourdough bread (uncut, 12 inches long)
  • 2 large bananas, peeled 

Recipes

Mix the sugar and cinnamon in a medium-sized bowl. Set aside. Then, whip eggs in a medium bowl– beat thoroughly. Add milk, cinnamon, and sugar. Mix well and set aside.   

For Tonga Toast: 

Using caution, preheat oil to 350°F in a large pot or a deep fryer. (If using a large pot, use a candy thermometer to make certain the oil does not get any hotter or it will burn.) 

Slice the bread into four three-inch-thick slices. 

Cut each banana in half crosswise, then each piece lengthwise. 

Place a bread slice flat on the counter and tear out just enough from the middle (do not tear all the way through) to stuff half a banana into; repeat with each bread slice. 

Dip stuffed bread into batter, covering both sides, allowing excess batter to drip off bread and place carefully into hot oil. 

Cook 4-5 minutes until golden brown. If needed, turn toast over after 2 minutes and cook for another 2 minutes on other side. Remove and drain excess oil. 

Roll toast in cinnamon-sugar. Repeat for each piece of toast. 

Pret A Manger’s beloved chocolate chip cookies

We’ve been inundated with requests for the secret to our Dark Chocolate Chunk Cookies. This recipe is perfect for rookie…

Posted by Pret A Manger on Friday, April 3, 2020

The popular high street chain published the beloved recipe after being “inundated” with requests to publish the recipe since the coronavirus outbreak.

According to Pret, they’ll be releasing more great recipes on their social feeds within the next few days!

McDonald’s sausage and egg McMuffin

There’s nothing like the real deal, but McDonald’s shared its sausage-and-egg McMuffin recipe and so far reviews coming in seem like it could be the real deal!

Ingredients

An English muffin

75g Sausage meat

Eggs

American Cheese Slice 

Potato 

Method

– Toast the English muffin until golden brown. 

– Season with a pinch of salt and pepper then shape into balls. Flatten into patty shapes and cook under a pre-heated grill for six to seven minutes on each side (or as per instructions on packaging).

– Brush the inside of a metal ring with a little oil and place in a small frying pan. Pour in just enough water to cover the base then bring to the boil. Crack the eggs into the rings, cover the pan and cook for two-three minutes.

– Assemble your McMuffin by layering the patty and egg on top of a slice of cheese.

– To make a hash brown, grate the potato into a bowl. Mix in an egg, then season with salt and pepper. Heat a glug of oil in a pan then add spoonfuls of the mix. Flatten and cook until golden brown on both sides.

Disney’s churros.

Disney published the recipe for its beloved churros to give fans of the crunchy tweet a “little taste of Disney magic” while at home.

Disney Parks Churro Bites

You can click here for a print-at-home version of the recipe!

Ingredients

  • 1 cup water
  • 8 tablespoons butter
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon, divided
  • 1 ¼ cups all-purpose flour
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 ½ cups vegetable or canola oil
  • ½ cup sugar

Instructions

  1. Combine water, butter, salt, and ¼ teaspoon cinnamon in 1 ½-quart saucepan over medium heat. Bring pot to rolling boil.
  2. Reduce heat to low.
  3. Add flour and stir vigorously until mix forms a ball. Remove from heat and let rest for 5-7 min.
  4. Add eggs, one at a time, and stir until combined. Set aside.
  5. Heat oil in medium skillet or 1-quart saucepan over medium-high heat or until temperature reaches 350˚.
  6. Spoon dough into piping bag fitted with large star tip. Pipe 1-inch strip of dough over saucepan, cut with knife, and drop into hot oil. Repeat until churro bites fill saucepan with room to fry. 
  7. Fry churro bites until golden brown. Remove with slotted spoon or mesh spider strainer.
  8. Drain churro bites on paper towel.
  9. Mix sugar and ½ teaspoon cinnamon in medium bowl. Toss in churro bites until coated. Place on serving plate and serve with favorite dipping sauce.

Wagamama’s katsu curry

To keep up the spirit, Wagamama launched a cooking channel to share its signature katsu curry recipe.

The Chicken Katsu Curry

the sauce | serves two –
2–3 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 onion, finely chopped
1 garlic clove, crushed
2.5cm piece of ginger, peeled + grated
1 teaspoon turmeric
2 heaped tablespoons mild
curry powder
1 tablespoon plain flour
300ml chicken or veg stock
100ml coconut milk
1 teaspoon light soy sauce
1 teaspoon sugar, to taste

the dish | serves two –
120g rice (any rice will do!)
1 quantity katsu curry sauce
2 skinless chicken breasts
50g plain flour
2 eggs, lightly beaten
100g panko breadcrumbs
75ml vegetable oil, for deep-frying
40g mixed salad leaves

DoubleTree’s chocolate chip cookies

According to Bussiness Wire DoubleTree cookies have a long and passionate following. The sites says that more than 30 million are consumed every year, and “the DoubleTree chocolate chip cookie even became the first food to be baked in orbit during experiments aboard the International Space Station.”

DoubleTree Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe

Makes 26 cookies

½ pound butter, softened (2 sticks)
¾ cup + 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
¾ cup packed light brown sugar
2 large eggs
1 ¼ teaspoons vanilla extract
¼ teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 ¼ cups flour
½ cup rolled oats
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
Pinch cinnamon
2 ⅔ cups Nestle Tollhouse semi-sweet chips chocolate chips
1 ¾ cups chopped walnuts

Waffle House’s waffle mix!

Last week the Waffle House chain revealed it was finally selling bags of its signature waffle mix!

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Cardi B Just Created An Instagram Account For Kulture And It’s The Cutest Thing Ever

Entertainment

Cardi B Just Created An Instagram Account For Kulture And It’s The Cutest Thing Ever

There’s a new influencer in town and her name is Kulture Kiari. 

On Saturday, Cardi B posted a photo of 2-year-old Kulture to her Instagram page, writing: “Follow @KultureKiari new IG…So much cool cute baby stuff coming up.”

The Instagram page Cardi was linking to was a brand new page dedicated to the chart-topping rapper’s daughter, Kulture.

via kulturekiari/Instagram

So far, the page has only thirteen photos posted, but has already racked up over 700,000 followers–and counting. 

A few of the pictures show Kulture in peak-cute form, wearing an adorable plaid skirt and pink cardigan. She also has a big white bow fixed on top of her head. 

The rest of the photos range from Kulture swimming in a pool to experimenting with Snapchat filters. All of the pictures have captions written in first-person, like “I look like mommy here” and “My mom was annoying me but it’s ok cause I look cute.”

The Instagram account even has some #TBT photos of when culture was a baby–one notably cute one where she’s trying mashed potatoes for the first time. 

via iamcardib/Instagram

Naturally, Cardi’s fans are eating up all the extra Kulture content, writing comments like “Kulture is looking all cute” and “She is so freaking beautiful”.

Commenters couldn’t help but exclaim over Kulture’s fashionable outfits, accessories and hairstyles. 

In the past, Cardi has defended her decision to dress Kulture in expensive designer clothing, saying that her child is in the public eye and deserves to be dressed as well as she is.

“If I’m fly and Daddy’s fly, then so is the kid. If I’m wearing Cha-nay-nay, my kid’s having the same, you know what I’m saying,” she said on Instagram. “Because if I was looking like a bad b**ch, expensive b**ch and I have my kid looking like a bum bum, then y’all would be talking s**t.”

via Vogue/Instagram

Kulture’s new Instagram page comes just days after Cardi B filed for divorce from husband of three years, Offset.

While she has largely stayed mum on the topic, she recently broke her silence via Instagram, explaining the reason behind the divorce. Cardi said she was simply “tired of the arguments” and that her and Offset “grew apart”. She also added that she “hasn’t shed one tear” over the dissolution of her marriage.

Interestingly enough, Offset has previously been candid about his desire for Kulture to stay out of the public eye and lead a relatively normal life. “I want my kids to be kids. I don’t like them having Instagram, I don’t want to move to LA, so there won’t be cameras in their face,” he told The Breakfast Club in 2019. “I keep my kids in public school, I don’t want my kid to be spoiled.”

Cardi, it looks like, has other plans.

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‘Vintage Latinas’ Is Hyping Up WOC Entertainers Often Forgotten By Media

Fierce

‘Vintage Latinas’ Is Hyping Up WOC Entertainers Often Forgotten By Media

Amid a life-threatening pandemic, political upheaval and a dawning economic crisis, the future can feel frighteningly uncertain. We’ve all been coping in our own ways: from practicing meditation to trying out new recipes to starting creative projects. For me, joy has come in the form of history. Learning about women, particularly Latinas, who entertained audiences on the silver screen or at cabarets, fought for their countries and communities, and created beauty and fashion trends has brought me bliss at a time when I couldn’t even imagine happiness as a possibility. Realizing how healing the stories of our foremothers have been for me, I decided to create Vintage Latinas, an Instagram account dedicated to the Latina and Latin American women and femmes of yesterday.

Through the online community, I post daily photos and videos of women from the 1900s up until the early 2000s. I accompany each image with a lengthy caption that either introduces followers to former stars they’ve never heard of or shares little-known facts and stories about popular icons. Highlighting women and femmes across Latin America, the Spanish Caribbean and the U.S., the page is sprinkled with popular faces like Celia Cruz, Rita Moreno, Frida Kahlo and Bianca Jagger as well as radiant figures who aren’t as celebrated in popular media today like María Montez, Rosa Luna, Maribel Arrieta and Ajita Wilson. My goal is to commemorate the beauty, style, talent, brilliance and power of these women. To do so, I spotlight everyone from actresses, singers, dancers, models and showgirls to artists, designers, beauty queens, party czars, activists and trendsetters. 

It’s not surprising to me that at a time when I have limited control over the unpredictable future I decided to turn my attention to the past. A lover of history, I often find refuge in the narratives of people from yesterday who fought against powerful people, systems and countries to create change for their communities. This was no different. After losing my job in March and being locked up in quarantine for the months that followed, my mental and spiritual health took hard blows. While addressing the issues I was experiencing and developing a wellness routine, I decided to delve into literature about Julia de Burgos, Lolita Lebrón, Blanca Canales, Iris Morales and Denise Oliver-Velez — some of the Puerto Rican nationalists and revolutionaries I hold dear to my heart.

But unlike my experiences in the past, while rereading these works I began imagining the periods in which these women lived — the early- and mid-twentieth century — outside the political and social battles they were fighting.

Immediately, I found myself researching artists and actresses my heroines might have listened to and admired, expanding my interest in these eras beyond struggle and protests.

Soon, guarachas and boleros from artists like Myrta Silva, Carmen Delia Dipini, Lucecita Benitez and Toña la Negra were booming from my speakers more than my favorite reggaetoneros. I was spending my weekends happy that I was forced to stay home because that gave me the chance to search and watch Old Hollywood classics. Obsessed with the makeup and style of the women I was watching, I started repurposing the clothes in my closet to look like outfits inspired by some of my ‘60s and ‘70s fashion inspirations, like Lola Falana, Raquel Welch and Tina Aumont.

I was balancing news of a scary future with the stories and aesthetics of erstwhile powerful Latinas who resisted, lived and loved during similarly turbulent times.

When I started Vintage Latinas a month ago, I simply wanted to create a space where I could honor all the women who were positively influencing my life. For me, it was a hobby, something fun and joyful to do between freelance writing gigs and trying to land a full-time job amid a pandemic. But within days, the page grew into something more. Very quickly, people began following Vintage Latinas, commenting on the posts and sharing the content with their audiences. They even encouraged others to follow the page and called it their favorite account on Instagram. I knew that the dynamic personalities and enduring influence of these sensational women were as healing — or at least as captivating — to others as they were to me. By week one, the page went from a personal hobby to a creative project and online community where people from all over the world are remembering and discovering our Latina and Latin American heroines. 

As I embark on Vintage Latinas’ second month, I have several exciting plans I will begin executing. In addition to my daily posts about historic stars, I’ll be utilizing original and user-generated content to create a browsing experience I hope will excite followers. I’ll be creating activities, like trivia-style quizzes, polls and “Finish the Lyrics” games, featuring vintage images of the everyday matriarchs of the community and conducting interviews through Instagram Live with historians and modern-day Latinas who dress in vintage and pinup, among several other undertakings.

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Puerto Rican singer and politician Ruth Fernández is considered one of the most powerful women and barrier-breakers in Puerto Rican history. Born in Ponce, Puerto Rico in 1919, Fernández began singing publicly as a teenager, performing at age 14 on local radio stations for 50 cents a day. Heard by Mingo, a famous bandleader, she was invited to join the group in 1940, becoming the first woman to sing in a Puerto Rican orchestra. Performing in nightclubs, dances and casinos, Fernández became a star on the archipelago. However, celebrity didn't save her from experiencing anti-blackness. In 1944 when her band was contracted to perform at the Condado Vanderbilt Hotel for a benefit concert for the American Red Cross, she was told she had to enter the building through the kitchen door because of the color of her skin. But on the day of the show, Fernández ignored the racist protocol and entered through the main entrance. When asked years later about that night, she responded: "Me llamaron negra. ¿Negra? ¿Y qué?" From then on, she began referring to herself as "La Negra de Ponce." In 1972, Fernández was elected to Puerto Rico's Senate, representing the district of Ponce as a member of the Partido Popular Democrático de Puerto Rico until 1980. As a legislator, she sought reforms and better working conditions for artists and also considered the needs of Puerto Ricans living in the contiguous U.S. In her honor, a tenement in the Bronx — the Ruth Fernández Apartments — is named after her. Fernández has received awards from several countries in Latin America, while many cities in the U.S. — including Washington, D.C., New York and Los Angeles — have official "Ruth Fernández Days." She passed away in 2012 of a septic shock and pneumonia at the age of 92. Here she performs "Soy la que soy" in the 1960s. #ruthfernandez #puertorican #1960s #latinasdeayer #vintagelatina #vintage #vintagestyle #vintagefashion #vintagebeauty #retrostyle #blackbeauty #blackvintage

A post shared by Vintage Latinas (@vintage.latinas) on

The stories of our foremothers, who thrived or continued luchando despite racist systems, colonialism and state-instituted violence, are inspiring and must be preserved. Through Vintage Latinas, I aim to ensure their vibrant lives and contributions to culture and social justice aren’t forgotten. Instead, I want our barrier-breaking predecessors to be celebrated, and I hope you’ll join me in this digital rave that is equal parts history, culture, glam and community. 

Follow Vintage Latinas on Instagram.

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