Culture

Charro And Mariachi Nike Cortez Concept Is Something We Didn’t Know That We Needed

The Nike Cortez has a long and storied history in the Latino community. They are something that every Latino can identify because we have all seen them many times. One company has taken them and given them a whole new feel and people need them made.

Paisa Boys are teasing everyone with a Charro/Mariachi-inspired Nike Cortez.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CAEnnqHl_CS/

The design is pretty amazing. The Paisa Boys brand is unapologetic about who they are and what they want to do. They are using clothing to tell the story of the Chicano experience. The brand does not hold back and the products include the intricate and incredible designs from Mexican and Chicano culture.

Their website says they are sold out so it is worth paying attention when they start mentioning stuff.

https://www.instagram.com/p/B99rfy9FwHs/

Over the years, the brand has been giving the Chicano experience a voice through fashion. “Gringos Ilegales!” and “Fierro” are some of the terms that the Paisa Boys have used to bring some fashion choices that will definitely catch everyone’s attention.

The shoes are really something to behold.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CAIxgYOHjZw/

That amount of detail is wonderful and not trying too hard. It is a well-done expression of Mexican and Chicano culture. Not to mention the physical manifestation of the experience of people who lives in the U.S., LA specifically, and spent time in Mexico with family. An American classic elevated and refined with a Mexican and Chicano lens.

People are already lining up to buy these shoes.

nike cortez
Credit: ek.prz / Instagram

We just need to know how much and how do we pay. Guarantee that these shoes would be a massive hit. Companies have given us culturally relevant shoes before and they are beloved.

Legit, people just are ready for this kind of heat.

nike cortez
Credit: pajarito_biz / Instagram

No one is ready for this kind of fire. There is no way to know that these were shoes that we needed. We never realized how amazing shoes like this could be and now that we’ve seen them, we can’t unsee it. How do we get these done? Do we petition? What are the steps?

Not being able to get these shoes is already bumming people out.

nike cortez
Credit: bunkhomie / Instagram

Like, for real. Feelings are already getting hurt. We need to be able to make these part of our wardrobe. What will it take, Nike?

READ: The Swoosh Gets The Latino Treatment: Nike Launches Limited-Edition ‘Día De Muertos’ Collection Complete With Calaveras And Papel Picado Designs

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Nike Gets Temporary Restraining Order Against Lil Nas X’s ‘Satan Shoes’

Fierce

Nike Gets Temporary Restraining Order Against Lil Nas X’s ‘Satan Shoes’

JOHANNES EISELE / Getty

Updated April 1, 2021

Rapper and singer Lil Nas X jumped headfirst into the pool controversy this week. After setting the internet on fire recently with his latest single, the rapper ramped up the heat with a new shoe line called Satan Shoes. Featuring a bronze pentagram, an inverted cross, and a drop of real human blood, the shoes by Lil Nas sold out almost immediately.

It also launched a wave of comments and criticism.

The black and red sneakers came from a collaboration with Lil Nas X and New York-based art collective MSCHF.

The shoes were made with Nike Air Max 97s. Since the release, however, Nike has come forth to distance itself from the limited-edition design which dropped 666 pairs sold out in less than a minute. The shoes were priced at $1,018 a number that refers to the Bible passage Luke 10:18 which reads “I saw Satan fall like lightning from heaven.”

Each shoe has an air bubble sole that contains 60 cubic centimeters (2.03 fluid ounces) of red ink and according to MSCHF “one drop” of human blood. According to MSCHF spokesperson, the blood was provided by members of the art collective. “We love to sacrifice for our art,” he stated.

In a statement about the shoes, Nike said it was not involved in producing the modified sneakers.

“We do not have a relationship with Lil Nas or MSCHF,” the company said in an email to CNN. “Nike did not design or release these shoes and we do not endorse them.”

In response to the shoes, Nike requested a temporary restraining order.

On Thursday, a judge sided with Nike’s request for our temporary restraining order against the unofficial sneakers. 

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Nike is accusing the “Satan shoes” of damaging the company’s professional reputation. In reaction to the shoes, many consumers who believed them to be an official release threatened to boycott the company. While Nike did not sue the art collective over their “Jesus shoe” which was another unofficial Nike Air Max 97 shoe according to THR “Nike has left open the possibility of amending its complaint to include a claim over Jesus shoes too.” 

Of course it didn’t take long for the shoes to spark outrage online.

Political and religious figures, like South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem and the evangelical pastor Mark Burns, were quick to chime in with their opinions about the shoes. In a tweet about the shoes, Burns called them “evil” and “heresy.”

Many fans of Lil Nas meanwhile, tweeted their support, however.

In response to the backlash around the shoe Lil Nas posted a video to his official YouTube account titled “Lil Nas X Apologizes for Satan Shoe.” The video has already been viewed over 1.8 million times and after a few seconds the “apology” cuts to a scene from the rapper’s latest music video, “Montero (Call Me By Your Name).” The video shows him dancing with a devil character. At one point the rapper snaps the devil’s neck and taking his horned crown for himself to wear.

Lil Nas X responded to the backlash over the music video’s rebellious religious imagery stating “I spent my entire teenage years hating myself because of the s**t y’all preached would happen to me because i was gay… So i hope u are mad, stay mad, feel the same anger you teach us to have towards ourselves.”

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This Artist Has Been Breaking Barriers As A Non-Traditional Mariachi

Entertainment

This Artist Has Been Breaking Barriers As A Non-Traditional Mariachi

Courtesy of Timothy Pollard

On a recent episode of ABC’s game show To Tell The Truth, three celebrity panelists were tasked to uncover the identity of a real mariachi singer.

Each contender embodied “non-traditional” attributes of mariachi culture either through physical appearance or language barriers, leaving the panelists stumped.

When it came time for the big reveal, with a humble smile 53-year-old Timoteo “El Charro Negro” stood up wowing everyone. Marveled by his talents, Timoteo was asked to perform unveiling his smooth baritone voice.

While not a household name in the U.S., his career spans over 25 years thriving on the catharsis of music.

Timoteo “El Charro Negro” performing “Chiquilla Linda” on Dante Night Show in 2017.

Originally from Dallas, Texas, Timoteo, born Timothy Pollard, moved to Long Beach, California with his family when he was eight years old. The move to California exposed Pollard to Latin culture, as the only Black family in a Mexican neighborhood.

As a child, he recalled watching Cantinflas because he reminded him of comedian Jerry Lewis, but musically he “got exposed to the legends by chance.”

“I was bombarded by all the 1960s, ’70s, and ’50s ranchera music,” Timoteo recalls to mitú.

The unequivocal passion mariachi artists like Javier Solis and Vicente Fernandez possessed heavily resonated with him.

“[The neighbors] always played nostalgic music, oldies but goodies, and that’s one thing I noticed about Mexicans,” Timoteo says. “They can be in their 20s but because they’ve grown up listening to the oldies it’s still very dear to them. That’s how they party.”

For as long as he can remember, Pollard “was born with the genetic disposition to love music,” knowing that his future would align with the arts.

After hearing Vicente Fernandez sing “Lástima Que Seas Ajena,” an awakening occurred in Pollard. While genres like hip-hop and rap were on the rise, Pollard’s passion for ranchera music grew. It was a moment when he realized that this genre best suited his big voice.

Enamored, Pollard began to pursue a career as a Spanish-language vocalist.

El Charro Negro
Photo courtesy of Timothy Pollard.

At 28, Timoteo began learning Spanish by listening and singing along to those artists he adored in his youth.

“When I decided that I wanted to be a mariachi, I didn’t think it was fair to exploit the culture and not understand the language,” he says. “If I’m going to sing, I need to be able to communicate with my audience and engage with them. I need to understand what I’m saying because it was about honor and respect.”

Pollard began performing local gigs after picking up the language in a matter of months. He soon attracted the attention of “Big Boy” Radio that adorned him the name Timoteo “El Charro Negro.”

Embellishing his sound to highlight his Black heritage, Pollard included African instruments like congas and bongos in his orchestra. Faintly putting his own spin on a niche genre, Pollard avoided over-saturating the genre’s sound early in his career.

Embraced by his community as a beloved mariachi, “El Charro Negro” still encountered race-related obstacles as a Black man in the genre.

“There are those [in the industry] who are not in the least bit thrilled to this day. They won’t answer my phone calls, my emails, my text messages I’ve sent,” he says. “The public at large hasn’t a problem with it, but a lot of the time it’s those at the helm of decision making who want to keep [the genre] exclusively Mexican.”

“El Charro Negro” persisted, slowly attracting fans worldwide while promoting a message of harmony through his music.

In 2007, 12 years into his career, Pollard received a golden ticket opportunity.

El Charro Negro
Pollard (left) seen with legendary Mexican artist Vicente Fernandez (right) in 2007. Photo courtesy of Timothy Pollard.

In a by-chance encounter with a stagehand working on Fernandez’s tour, Pollard was offered the chance to perform onstage. The singer was skeptical that the offer was legit. After all, what are the chances?

The next day Pollard went to his day job at the time and said, “a voice in my head, which I believe was God said, ‘wear your blue velvet traje tonight.'”

That evening Pollard went to a sold-out Stockton Area where he met his idol. As he walked on the stage, Pollard recalls Fernandez insisting that he use his personal mic and band to perform “De Que Manera Te Olvido.”

“[Fernandez] said he did not even want to join me,” he recollects about the show. “He just was kind and generous enough to let me sing that song on his stage with his audience.”

The crowd applauded thunderously, which for Pollard was a sign of good things to come.

El Charro Negro
Timoteo “El Charro Negro” with Don Francisco on Don Francisco Presenta in 2011. Photo courtesy of Timothy Pollard.

In 2010, he released his debut album “Me Regalo Contigo.” In perfect Spanish, Pollard sings with great conviction replicating the soft tones of old-school boleros.

Unraveling the rollercoaster of relationships, heart-wrenchingly beautiful ballads like “Me Regalo Contigo” and “Celos” are his most streamed songs. One hidden gem that has caught the listener’s attention is “El Medio Morir.”

As soon as the track begins it is unlike the others. Timoteo delivers a ’90s R&B love ballad in Spanish, singing with gumption as his riffs and belts encapsulate his unique sound and story.

Having appeared on shows like Sabado Gigante, Don Francisco Presenta, and Caso Cerrado in 2011, Timoteo’s career prospered.

Timoteo hasn’t released an album since 2010 but he keeps his passion alive. The singer has continued to perform, even during the Covid pandemic. He has high hopes for future success and original releases, choosing to not slow down from his destined musical journey.

“If God is with me, who can be against me? It may not happen in a quick period of time, but God will make my enemies my footstool,” he said.

“I’ve continued to be successful and do some of the things I want to do; maybe not in a particular way or in particular events, but I live in a very happy and fulfilled existence.”

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