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The FBI Is Investigating the ‘Trump Train’ Group With Ties to QAnon That Brigaded Biden’s Campaign Bus

Photo: Getty Images/Scott Olson

Investigative reporters found that the caravan of Trump supporters who blocked Joe Biden’s campaign bus in Texas have ties to QAnon conspiracy theory activity online. The fact-finding website Snopes discovered that the caravan was organized in a Facebook group called “Alamo City Trump Trains,” a group that is “littered with activity” tied to QAnon

According to Snopes, the “Alamo City Trump Trains” Facebook group is comprised of people who post pro-Trump memes and content. The pro-Trump group apparently has many members that frequently post QAnon references and lingo. QAnon flags and merchandise can also be spotted at the group’s events and in their YouTube videos.

The group organized the brigade through posts hash-tagged with #OperationBlockTheBus. Hundreds of the group’s members interacting with the posts, commenting and “liking” them.

As background, a group of Trump-supporters in trucks brigaded Joe Biden’s campaign bus on October 20th while it was on the Interstate 35 in Texas. Video shows trucks decked out in Pro-Trump flags and blocking-in and tailgating the Biden bus as well as the white SUV that was accompanying the bus.

At one point, the SUV attempted to change lanes to remain behind the campaign bus but a Trump truck prevented it from doing so. The footage shows the two cars colliding in a minor fender-bender as the truck blocks the SUV from changing lanes. According to Snopes, extended footage of the accident was even posted inside the private Facebook group. Snopes also reported that the incident is being investigated by the FBI.

The stand-off is notable because it shows the complete lack of civility our country has descended into on the eve of this historic election. Political division are no longer relegated to family arguments and Facebook rants, but have transformed into real-world violence.

QAnon is a dangerous far-right conspiracy theory that alleges that left-leaning politicians and celebrities are actually Satan-worshipping pedophiles who run a global child sex-trafficking ring. Believers are convinced that Trump is fighting against this evil cabal. The claims, needless to say, are completely false, but that hasn’t stopped some Trump supporters from spreading the harmful and inflammatory misinformation online.

And while young people are not immune from falling for these dangerous conspiracy theories, it is older generations who are more likely to believe in them. A recent study conducted by Princeton University found that people aged 65 years and older are seven times more likely to share fake news and misinformation on social media than those aged 18-29. Experts chalk it up to “digital media literacy”–millennials and Gen Z-ers have grown up on the internet, and have thus fine-tuned their radar that separates fact from fiction. Older generations are not as savvy.

Already, both Facebook and Twitter have attempted to reign in the harm of QAnon conspiracy theories, banning mentions of QAnon theories from their platforms. The social media giants have said that they believe the messages could lead to potential real-world violence.

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