Things That Matter

#VoteLikeAMadre Is Committing Latinas To Vote To Save The Planet For Their Children

The 2020 election is heating up. There are a lot of hot button issues at stake from reproductive rights and affordable access to healthcare to climate change and civil rights. The Latino Victory Project is using their resources to get Latinas to commit to voting with the understanding that their children will inherit the world they leave behind. Here’s how.

The #VoteLikeAMadre campaign is just that, voting like a mother.

The campaign is getting people, specifically Latinas, to vote for their children. Climate change is one of the most pressing issues facing people during the 2020 elections. That is why #VoteLikeAMadre is asking for people to pinky promise a better future for their children using their ability to vote.

The campaign hinges on the most important promise you can make to your kids: a pinky promise.

A pinky promise is so important with the children, you know. We all remember making our parents make pinky promises to make things happen for us to to give us things we really wanted. They were unbreakable promises that you constantly reminded your parents of making.

People are already taking the pledge to vote for candidates who have plans to combat climate change.

An estimated 1 billion people live in areas that are being affected by climate change. These people could all become climate refugees by 2050. That is one-seventh of the world’s population being displaced because of climate change. Our actions now can help to mitigate some of the damage that scientists expect.

People of color are among the most vulnerable communities when it comes to the negatives affects of climate change.

Latinos, as well as other communities of color, put a lot of importance on the climate crisis. Environmental justice is an issue that Latinos have been fighting for as our communities are often subjected to negative climate and environmental issues. According to a Yale study on climate change, Latinos are the most concerned about the climate crisis and its impact.

Early voters are already following through with their promises to fight for the climate.

Fighting for the climate is the same as fighting for the children. It is not a surprise that those who are younger will be the ones to inherit and live on the planet longer. Actions now can either ruin or save the planet and its climate for the generations to come.

“Many people assume that the only people who really care about climate change are white, well-educated, upper-middle-income, latte-sipping liberals, and it’s just not true,” Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication told PBS. “Actually, the racial and ethnic group that cares more about climate change than any other is Latinos.”

You can learn more about #VoteLikeAMadre, go to their website.

You can learn more about the campaign and the fight to save the climate here. Share with us about what you want to see most in the next leaders of the U.S. by commenting below.

READ: American Latinos United Launches Committee To Take Down President Trump In 2020

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IWillVote.com Makes It Easier Than Ever to Iron Out All the Details of Your Voting Plan

Things That Matter

IWillVote.com Makes It Easier Than Ever to Iron Out All the Details of Your Voting Plan

Photo by Adam Schultz / Biden for President

It goes without saying that the upcoming election is poised to be the most important election of our time. America’s economy is struggling under Trump’s disastrous handling of the COVID-19 pandemic. Latinos have been on the frontlines as essential workers and have taken the brunt of the pandemic’s negative economic impact. And Americans are more polarized and divided than ever. It’s time to come together. It’s time for a change.

The good news is, we the people have the power to make that change. The general election is on November 3rd and your vote is your voice. If you feel overwhelmed or confused by the voting process, know that there is nothing to fear. The Democratic National Committee has created a website called IWillVote.com that simplifies and streamlines the voting process–no matter where you live, no matter what your voting method of choice is. 

IWillVote.com makes it so it’s never been an easier or more convenient time to make your voice heard. It has tons of useful features that can break down the voting process so anyone can do it. The website covers everything from early to day-of voting, from mail-in ballots to in-person options. And if you prefer to find out information in Spanish, the DNC has a Spanish-language website called VoyAVotar.com. So, all your bases are covered.

IWillVote.com has all the features you need to help you create your perfect voting plan for you. Not sure if you’re registered? IWillVote.com will know–and help you figure it out if you aren’t! Want an absentee ballot? You can request one through IWillVote.com. Wondering where to vote in-person? IWillVote.com keeps its information constantly updated accurately so you can find out where your nearest polling place is. 

IWillVote.com takes all of the confusion out of the voting process so you can focus on helping move our country forward instead of getting bogged down by the logistical details of election day. Not to mention, the website has state-specific pages that break down deadlines and requirements depending on where you live. 

Latinos are now the largest ethnic minority group in the United States. We can’t let our community be left behind by failing to make our voice heard. We get to decide the future–all we have to do is vote it into existence. Once you decide your voting plan, make sure to help your friends and family make one too, because every vote matters. And with so much at stake, we can’t afford to sit this one out. The future is on the ballot. 

Go to IWillVote.com and text VOTE to 30330 to learn what choices you have to vote in your community and get information on where and when to vote.

¿Buscas información en español? Visita la pagina web VoyAVotar.com

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Voting 101: Top Tips For First Time Voters Or Those Just A Little Out Of Practice

Things That Matter

Voting 101: Top Tips For First Time Voters Or Those Just A Little Out Of Practice

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The election heat is on, and you might be totally new to the whole affair. There are a whole lot of things to figure out if it’s your first time voting, including whether you’re eligible, as well as questions about timing, logistics, candidates, and more. No worries, though, because here are some tips for first-time voters as well as people who may be a little out of practice.

And with the Coronavirus pandemic and Republican attacks on voting rights and access, it’s more important than ever that you vote with as much knowledge as possible.

Below, see everything you need to know about being a first-time voter, from registration to placing an absentee ballot to what items you’ll need to be prepared when you head to your polling place.

Make sure you’re registered to vote!

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The first step in preparing to vote is to make sure that you’ve registered to vote before the cut-off date, which varies from state to state.

If you won’t be in town, you can cast your vote via an absentee ballot, which is often referred to as mail-in voting. (Note: some states will let you vote by mail even if you will be in town.) VOTE411.org has all the information you need to know about how to get registered and request an absentee ballot in your state. Be extra careful to note the deadline, since absentee ballots often have a due date before the actual election, and the United States Postal Service is likely to get overburdened as Election Day gets closer. Check out Teen Vogue‘s explainer on voting by mail if you want to learn more about the pros and cons of going this route.

Learn more about the candidates and referendums.

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Some people may want to vote — but don’t know who to vote for. You can check out voter guides related to your state, as well from organizations that are offering comprehensive information on which candidate is running for which office in your state. Plus, there’s Ballot Ready for learning about the issues candidates stand against or in favor of.

Actually showing up to vote…

Most states will send you a voter card to confirm that you are registered. This piece of mail will likely include your designated polling place. If it doesn’t have that information or you misplaced your card, you can look it up online. Here’s an easy tool that will point you in the right direction. You won’t need to bring your voter card with you, but your state may require a valid photo ID.

Most polling places open between 6 and 9 a.m. and stay open until around 7 to 9 p.m., but double check with yours just to make sure (this will probably be listed online or via your local news media). Show up in the morning if possible to beat the crowds. Many states hold early voting periods in the lead-up to Election Day, which are a great way to avoid long lines and ensure your ballot is counted.

What should you expect at the polling station?

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If you’re curious to know what it is like to be at a polling station, just search for “voting machines” along with your state’s name on Google. This should give you ample material on the equipment at the station and how you’re expected to use it. If you don’t have the time, you can simply ask a poll worker who should help you navigate the station

Can you vote early?

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The option to vote early ends a few days before the Election Day, depending on your state. So head on over here to find out if you can vote early.

Can you leave work or school to vote?

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If you work or need to attend classes, you should tell your management or administration about your plans so you can take time off. Find out your state’s laws about leaving work early to vote.

Can you take a selfie to show off your pride in democracy?

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You may also be tempted to take a selfie with your ballot to share your experience on social media. However, make sure to be careful of your state’s laws when it comes to taking photos at a polling station. According to USA Today, some states strictly forbid taking photos, although many states still have unclear guidelines. If you are unsure of what your state allows, it’s probably a safer bet to not post that selfie.

What should you do if you feel like your rights were violated?

In the event that you suspect your voting rights were violated (for example, if you think your voter registration was removed or you were turned away from a polling station for a suspicious reason) contact the number for ACLU’s Election Protection: (866) 687-8683. The website provides detailed information for contacting officials in your own state.

What should you do if there are intimidating political groups or others protesting outside your polling place?

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Nearly every state in America prohibits people from political campaigning within 100 feet of the voting station. If you are aggressively accosted by someone attempting to persuade or dissuade your voting choice, alert a polling official.

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