Things That Matter

UnidosUS Is Hosting A Free, Online Convention Discussing Issues Facing Latinos

The pandemic is forcing everything to go online and that includes the UnidosUS 2020 Annual Conference. The conference is happening from July 27-28 and will include panels for politicians, activists, and journalists. The Virtual Marketplace will follow July 29-30 to replace the National Latino Family Expo.

The UnidosUS conference is happening and you can take part for free.

Latino leaders will be joining various panels to talk about the things that matter to Latinos. The conference is free and open to anyone with an Internet connection who wants to listen in on the discussions that are touching on subjects and discussion pertinent to the Latino community.

“We did not come to this decision lightly, but it has become clear that, in the face of an unprecedented situation, we needed to make this difficult decision to transition our Annual Conference into a virtual event,” UnidosUS President and CEO Janet Murguía said in a statement when the virtual conference was announced. “Our experience in the past few weeks shows that our community is still looking for an opportunity to connect, even if it is online, and we are confident that this virtual event will allow more people the opportunity to access the largest national convening of Latinos in the country.”

The conference is covering a lot of topics that are pressing for community members.

The conference is bringing together Latino minds and voices to speak on things ranging from the economy to health care to candidates fighting for our community. During two days, the Latino community will have a chance to hear how those leading the community are ready to get things done.

One of the first events is a conversation with Senator Elizabeth Warren.

The U.S. is facing a long road to economic recovery. COVID-19 has been devastating and the financial injuries to the Latino community are big. It is going to take a lot of action and bold leadership to lead that recovery.

Continuing that conversation is “The State of Latinx America.”

Each state has had a different response for COVID-19 because the federal government never developed a national plan. Now, Latinos in different states are facing different consequences. However, one thing is for sure, COVID-19 has done truly devastated us. Latinos are the most impacted population and we have the furthest to go in recovering.

And, of course, some phenomenal Latinas are coming together to show the fierce mujeres out there.

Trailblazers in their field will discuss the road to success. Being Latina comes with the largest pay gap and it is important to know how we can overcome. Let’s teach you how to make things work for you.

READ: A Woman Battled COVID-19 Then Gave Birth On A Ventilator And Died

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Joe Biden And President Donald Trump Are Battling It Out For Florida’s Crucial Latino Vote

Things That Matter

Joe Biden And President Donald Trump Are Battling It Out For Florida’s Crucial Latino Vote

joebiden / Instagram

Florida’s Latino vote is a crucial part of a winning strategy in the Sunshine State. The demographic shifts in recent years because of natural, financial, and governmental disasters has led to a big Puerto Rican diaspora in Florida. President Trump’s handling of the Hurricane Maria recovery has left Puerto Ricans upset with the administration.

Joe Biden and President Donald Trump are battling for Florida’s Latino voters.

Both the Democratic and Republican nominees are making concerted efforts to shore up Latino support in Florida. There are 3.1 million eligible Latino voters in the swing state and make up a crucial voting bloc. While a large number are conservative Cubans and Cuban-Americans, there are also other Latino communities representing different parts of Latin America.

The polling tells a story of two candidates locked in a heated race for the Latino vote in Florida.

Polls, like The Washington Post-ABC News poll, show Biden taking the lead with Latino voters in Florida. According to that poll, Biden is leading Trump 52 percent to 39 percent. However, Hillary Clinton won the Latino vote in Florida 62 percent to 35 percent in 2016. Clinton’s success with the Latino community of Florida shows that the Latino vote is not the only way to clinch the electoral college votes.

On the other hand, President Trump wants everyone to pay attention to one poll. President Trump is sharing a poll by The Washington Post and ABC News that shows him leading in Florida. According to the poll, Trump leads in Florida by 4 points.

The Latino community in southern Florida is being bombarded by a disinformation campaign.

The disinformation is aimed at Florida’s Latino voters and is peddling conspiracy theories against Biden. One of the most prominent examples of this disinformation was the racist and anti-Semitic insert published in a recent edition of the Miami Herald. The insert compared BLM protesters to Nazis but argued that Nazis were nicer since they didn’t steal anything.

Both candidates are pouring money into their campaign efforts in Florida. Both are spending time and money trying to court the Latino vote in an effort to win the key state.

Critics of the president are pointing to the sudden relief package to Puerto Rico is a grab for votes.

President Trump was harshly and fairly criticized after he didn’t respond to the natural disaster in Puerto Rico. The 2017 hurricane devastated the island and left millions without power for weeks. One of the most memorable moments of that time was President Trump throwing paper towels to Puerto Ricans recovering from the disaster.

President Trump, during an election, approved $13 billion in relief funds for Puerto Rico. Puerto Rican voters have not forgotten the three years it took for the president to approve relief funds to help rebuild the island after a devastating storm.

READ: The Miami Herald Apologizes For Including Racist, Anti-Semitic Insert In Newspaper

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New Poll Finds That Young Latino Voters Consider “Racial and Ethnic Social Equality” the Most Important Issue This Election

Things That Matter

New Poll Finds That Young Latino Voters Consider “Racial and Ethnic Social Equality” the Most Important Issue This Election

In a poll of  638 young Latino voters, aged 18-34, conducted by BuzzFeed News in conjunction with Telemundo, the results found that the most pressing topics on the minds of young Latino voters was “racial and ethnic social equality”–an issue that 62.7% of the demographic considers the most urgent this election. And that’s not all.

The illuminating survey revealed that 55.8% of young Latino voters had participated someway in supporting the Black Lives Matter movement.

They expressed their support through physically demonstrating on the streets or other forms of activism like donating or boycotting. According to their responses, it was the fervor and intensity of the Black Lives Matter movement that has fueled their fire to vote. 

Although 60% of young Latino voters have committed to voting for Biden, 19% still say they will support President Trump come November. This response is surprising to some, considering that President Trump is almost universally considered the most anti-Hispanic, anti-immigration U.S. President in recent history. 

via Getty Images

While the passion and social activism of young Latinos is exciting, the lack of enthusiasm for Presidential candidate Joe Biden is cause for concern.

After all, as Univision anchor Jorge Ramos, put it in a New York Times opinion piece: “There is no route to the White House without the support of Latinos.” 

The poll also revealed Latinos’ overwhelming belief that there is no unifying political figure in the Latino community. When asked to name a politician who “goes out of their way to support their community,” the leading response was “Nobody”. Participants then listed Vice President Joe Biden, Senator Bernie Sanders, and Representative Alexandria Ocasio Cortez as second choices, each politician gaining 6% of the participants’ votes. 

“It’s heartbreaking,” said executive director of the group Alliance for Youth Action, Sarah Audelo, to NBC News.

We can’t have so many young Latinos disconnected from the process because they don’t feel part of it.”

Ramos described the tiresome election-year scramble to secure the Latino vote through cringey attempts at speaking Spanish and dropping in on Latino community events as “Christopher Columbus syndrome”. “It’s such an open and flagrant display of opportunism,” he wrote.

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