Things That Matter

Mijente Is Petitioning For Univision And Telemundo To Change Their Bias Approach To The BLM Protests

Update: The Black Lives Matter protests aren’t going anywhere. Cities and states are listening and bowing to pressure from protesters demanding a radical change to policing. Yet, while the rest of the country watches the peaceful protests, Univisión and Telemundo are being called out for perpetuating racial bias in their coverage. Mijente is demanding some change.

Mijente is calling on Univisión and Telemundo to do better with their BLM coverage.

The Latino community is plagued with anti-Black racism and sentiment. We all heard it while we were growing up from our parents and grandparents. It was in the form of microaggressions of the “mejorar la raza” variety. Well, now it is 2020 and it is time to hold our community accountable for their words against the Black community. Some are taking their fight to Univisión and Telemundo accusing them of perpetuating the same anti-Black racism in their coverage of the BLM protests.

“These two networks are the main source of information for millions of Latino households,” reads the petition demanding that Telemundo and Univisión do better in their reporting. “By producing news programming and content that focuses on negative depictions of protesters, that fails to cover the systematic causes of anti-Black police violence, and that makes no effort at centering the voices of Black people in their coverage the networks have contributed to the Latino community’s skewed and incomplete understanding of the current crisis. Their coverage feeds into anti-Black stereotypes that have historically existed in the Latino community, which in the extreme can and have been used as justification for anti-Black violence and which serves to further divide us.”

If you want to sign the petition, you can click here.

Original: In the wake of videos showing the arrest and death of George Floyd, protests have erupted across the country.

The video capturing Floyd’s death shows the 46-year-old African-American struggling to breathe under the harsh restrained of a police officer who used his knee to keep Floyd pinned to the ground by his neck. As Floyd struggled, bystanders pled with the arresting police officers to allow him to breathe.

Along with the protests and various outcries from political figures and celebrities across the country, media outlets have been thorough in their reports of the protests. Coverage has ranged from reports directly at the scene of protests as well as interviews with protestors and Black Lives Matter advocates and allies. Over the weekend, many outlets have also focused on the ways in which the protests have taken shape across the country with a small percentage of participants looting stores and being forced to battle against police who have resorted to using tear gas and violence to combat rioters.

Unfortunately, outlets like Telemundo and Univision have chosen to cover the events taking place by sensationalizing the violence taking place.

The two outlets, known for their coverage of Latino-related news, also have a common history of juggling racial issues along with biases within its newsrooms. It turns out, in a time when their Black audiences need them most, the two media outlets have failed once again. Over the weekend, users on Twitter were quick to call out both Telemundo and Univision for their fear-inducing coverage of the protests that have taken place over the weekend.

Speaking about the biased coverage one users’ post to Twitter sparked thousands of comments and retweets.

“I find it interesting that hispanic media like Univision & Telemundo are so selective on whats broadcasted in regards to the protests and riots going on knowing thats where the majority of our latin/hispanic parents depend on 4 info,” a user by the name of @valeriabty_wrote. “Turn that shit off n teach ur parents instead!”

Others were quick to point out the coverage is pretty par for the course when it comes to the Latinidad.

“I am a black Puerto Rican and I could not agree more, we Afro Latinos have little to no visibility within the Latino community. Colorism is alive and kicking in the community,” another user wrote.

Here’s hoping Telemundo and Univision find a way to change their approach to coverage and support the Black community.

A Black Transgender Woman Was Killed On The Last Day Of Pride

Things That Matter

A Black Transgender Woman Was Killed On The Last Day Of Pride

@astoldbymelly/ Twitter

We’re now almost halfway through 2020 and the statistics tallying the number of murders that have occurred this year in the trans community are alarming. Sadly when it came to the sacred month of Pride the trans community did not receive a break in these numbers, unfortunately.

A community in Dallas, Texas is currently coming to terms with the death of 22-year-old Merci Mack a Black transg woman whose body was discovered in Dallas on the final day of Pride.

Mack, whose body was discovered in a parking lot, is at least the 18th trans person to be killed in 2020.

According to reports, Mack’s body was discovered at 6:15 a.m and had sustained gunshot wounds. She was found in a parking lot of the Rosemont Apartments located in South Dallas. After her body was discovered, residents at the apartment claimed to police that they heard shots fired an hour beforehand. According to the Dallas Police Department, they never received a 911 about the incident. By the time an emergency response team came to the scene, Mack was dead.

Despite being an openly trans woman, reports by law enforcement and the local media deadnamed her.

The lack of support in using the deadnames of trans people has earned the ire of The Associated Press Stylebook  GLAAD and the Human Rights Campaign (HRC). AP urges reporters to use “use the name by which a transgender person now lives” and HRC has published trans reporting guidelines for police and members of the media. In a statement to BuzzFeed News, a spokesperson for the department has said that their “hearts go out to the grieving family who are trying to cope with the loss of their love one… Our detectives, as with all murders, are working diligently to find the perpetrator to this horrible crime.”

In response to Mack’s tragic death, LGBTQ+ groups have released statements honoring her life and legacy.

“Another Black transgender woman has had her life stolen from her,” Tori Cooper, a director of community engagement for HRC’s Transgender Justice Initiative stated an interview. “We cannot become numb to the fact that our community has learned of more killings of transgender and gender non-conforming people in the past few weeks than HRC has ever tracked in the past seven years.”

Mack is at least the 11th trans person to die since 2017 in Texas because of violence. Almost all of them have been Black women. Most recently, in May of this year, Helle Jae O’Regan was stabbed to death while at a barbershop in San Antonio.

Latinas talk “Imposter Syndrome”

Entertainment

Latinas talk “Imposter Syndrome”

Oli Scarff / Getty

Imposter syndrome. It may happen when you finally got accepted to college and have found yourself overwhelmed by the student body, or when you accepted that dream job, or even while doing your job. It can happen in relationships, in friendships. Basically anywhere and amongst us Latinas too. Even despite our hard work and much-earned credentials.

We wanted to talk about Imposter’s Syndrome and how to deal with it, so we reached out to our FIERCE audience on Instagram for their thoughts.

Latinas got real with their responses about feeling as if they were undeserving.

Check them out below!

Remind yourself that you’ve worked hard and are deserving.

“Thank you for posting this! I actually just got hired on as a school counselor and I’m feeling this intensely right now. I have to keep reminding myself that I worked so hard for this and that I AM WORTH IT!” – adelitafamania

Understand that anything can trigger it.

“It happens to me every single day on so many levels. It’s been holding me back my whole life and I keep pushing against it, some days it gets the better of me but I won’t give up on myself even when I really feel I’m not capable. I get so stressed all the time thinking someone is going to discover that I’m not smart, or fun, or whatever it is at that moment that I shut down. It’s so good to openly discuss it with friends or even professional help.” – pinatapink

And it can lead to social anxiety.

“This is so hard, I feel like this nearly every day. Lately, it’s been getting in the way of my entire purpose and whether or not I want to work hard at all. I tend to think, “Like for what? I don’t deserve to have the things I want because I didn’t work hard enough.” Yet, I did. Probably more than anyone else in my programs, jobs, teams, even my friend group. This is so tough and often it leads to my social anxiety which affects a whole multitude of behavioral patterns like procrastination and chronic lateness.” –curlsofroses

But you can battle it by not shrugging off your achievements.

“Happens to me all the time. And when people give me praise I tend to say “oh it’s not a big deal.” But I’m trying to remember that I’m enough and hell yeah I’m a big deal.” – erika_kiks18

Because it can happen to brain surgeons and Fortune 500 CEOs too.

“Our country and our community has been through a lot since the middle of March. Now more than ever is the time to nourish our goals and inspirations. In my podcast, I bring together some of the highest achieving Latinos that our country has to offer: Dr. Quinoñes-Hinojosa: who went from migrant farm worker to a world-renowned brain surgeon
Hector Ruiz: one of the very few Latinos to be a Fortune 500 CEO of an American Company Louis Barajas: the #1 financial Latino expert in the USA. (He is most likely your favorite Reggaeton artist’s to-go financial guy.)
Cesar Garcia: an actor who has seen. dozens of times in music videos, shows, and movies. He’s known for his roles in Fast and Furious and Breaking Bad. Chef Aarón Sánchez: The most well-known Latin Chef in the country. Find an episode that catches your attention or share an episode to a friend of loved one that would like to hear from other Latinos on how they achieved their dreams and goals.” – trailblazinglatinospodcast

And you can cure it by not reminding yourself to not give weight to other people’s thoughts.

“I cured mine by not giving a fck! The enemy is a LIEEEE.” –stephaniesaraii

And last but not least, know that it can be hard to defeat but you ARE worthy.

“This was me on the first day after I transferred to University. The feeling still follows me sometimes. It hard to defeat.” – dianalajandre