Things That Matter

People Are Astonished That This Little Girl Survived 5 Days Lost In The Brazilian Rainforest

After five days of search and rescue, a 4-year-old Brazilian girl was found alive a mile from her home in the rainforest. Her family had last seen her with her 8-year-old sister in a canoe, prompting family and search and rescue to assume the girl drowned in the river. That means that folks were scouring the nearby river instead of the nearby rainforest to find the girl. It was her 8-year-old cousin that eventually found her a mile away from their home, sitting on a tree trunk. Little Ana Vitoria Soares Cardosa survived without any adult supervision and without care for five days because of her reliance on tropical fruits and stream water. When she was found, she wasn’t able to walk and was dehydrated but has since been treated at a local hospital.

Meanwhile, her family is relieved that she was found alive and the rest of us have questions about how a 4-year-old passed the days and nights lost in a jungle without another human being nearby.

Officials say that Ana Vitoria Soares Cardosa is lucky to have been found alive.

CREDIT: @MAOSOO3H / TWITTER

Fire Chief Rosivaldo Andrede told local media that the young girl “went through tremendous difficulty.” She had to survive the elements — cold exposure at night, insects and parasites, infected scrapes and bruises, contaminated water, and finding means to nourish herself all on her own. “There were no dangerous animals in the area to attack, but this does not change the risk the forest poses, from cutting yourself, tripping, scrapes, the risk of the water, the cold, infections,” Andrede told reporters. 

Fire Chief Andrede had initially sent search and rescue to scour the river for her body.

CREDIT: MAP DATA ©2020 GOOGLE

“From December 30 to January 1 we searched without resting on the river, where the child’s body could be. The information given by her relatives made us believe that she could have died and that she could have not gone to the forest,” Andrede told local reporters. That’s because she was last seen in a canoe with her 8-year-old sister. She went missing soon after, prompting the family to believe the worst. Little Soares Cardosa doesn’t know how to swim. On December 29, the day she went missing, her family called emergency services. Soares Cardosa is one of nine children who live in the Rio Maniva community, a rural part of northern Brazil.

Thankfully, their worst fears were not realized. Instead of finding the drowned body of the young girl, she was found alive and well, considering the circumstances.

Soares Cardosa was found sitting on a tree trunk, unable to walk, on Jan. 2.

Credit: Chloe Benko-Prieur / Unsplash

Her 8-year-old cousin was walking through the nearby rainforest when she found the young girl, covered in scrapes and bruises, sitting on a trunk. The girl’s mother, Rosilete de Souza Soares, told reporters, “She was sitting on a trunk, but she was unable to walk. A cousin found her.” She also added that her resilient daughter survived by “eating fruit and drinking from a stream.” While the rest of us drop hundreds of dollars at REI to purchase all the necessary equipment to comfortably survive in the backcountry, conduct extensive research on which water filter is the best and most lightweight, this young girl only had her basic survival instincts to live off of. 

The entire story has folks both marveling at the human instinct to survive that lives within each of us, even from as young an age as 4-years-old, and lamenting that this young girl was without any human contact, comfort or care for five days, let alone in the wild. 

The girl didn’t sustain any major injuries and was only treated for dehydration at the hospital.

Credit: Marco Marques / Unsplash

The world continues to be in shock and awe that this young girl managed to survive for as long as she did without any major injuries. There are no reports as to why she was unable to walk at the time that she was found, but we imagine exhaustion would be perfectly reasonable. 

The young girl is still recovering in their neighboring state, Amapa, in a local hospital in the town of Santana. She’s expected to make a full recovery and has been photographed playing with a variety of balloons with a bandage going from her forearm up to her right bicep.

READ: Grandfather Of Toddler Who Fell To Her Death From A Cruise Ship Window Has Been Charged With Homicide

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Brazil is Fining Apple $2 Million For Selling the iPhone 12 Without A Charger, And We’re Not Mad About It

Things That Matter

Brazil is Fining Apple $2 Million For Selling the iPhone 12 Without A Charger, And We’re Not Mad About It

Photo via Getty Images

It seems like every new product rollout, Apple gets stingier and stingier with what they include with each purchase. And while Brazil has recently been in the headlines for controversial news, this time, they have the public opinion on their side. Standing up for consumers, Brazil is fining Apple for alleged “false advertising”.

On Friday, a consumer watchdog agency announced that Brazil is fining Apple for $2 million. The reason? Not including a charger with the iPhone 12.

According to Procon, the São Paulo-based consumer protection agency, Apple’s decision not to include a charger with the iPhone 12 amounts to “false advertising”. Procon also accused Apple of selling “defective products”, creating unfair contracts for consumers, and failing to repair products that are still under warranty.

Per Brazilian media, Procon contacted Apple last year to ask them why they were now excluding chargers and earbuds. However, the company “never offered a convincing explanation” to the Brazilian agency.

“Apple needs to understand that in Brazil there are solid laws and institutions for consumer protection,” said Procon executive Fernando Capez, explaining why Brazil is fining Apple. “It needs to respect these laws and these institutions.” 

In October of 2020, Apple announced that it would no longer include chargers or earbuds in their iPhone boxes. The company cited “environmental concerns”.

But savvy consumers couldn’t help but be skeptical of Apple’s explanation. Some people thought that Apple’s “environmental decision” was simply a pretense. In reality, they thought it might be a gimmick to take more money from customers under the pretense of environmentalism.

For one, we fail to see how including chargers and earbuds in an iPhone package would help the environment. Wouldn’t individual boxes for each product simply contribute to more waste? We digress….

In general, consumers across the globe can’t help but…agree with Procon.

Anyone who is an Apple devotee (read: prisoner) knows that you can end up feeling trapped as a customer. You become roped into an endless cycle of buying products that seem to be diminishing in quality every year. Not only that, but every year, the iPhone becomes more expensive while customers get less bang for their buck.

But at some point, you feel like you have to buy Apple products. Because of how Apple designs their products, all of the technology you own (laptops, tablets, chargers, etc.) only works with Apple products.

Starting to buy a different brand would be akin to throwing away hundreds (if not thousands) of dollars you’ve already invested in Apple tech. To be an Apple customer is to be stuck in a vicious cycle.

Hopefully, other governments will follow suit. After all, big tech has been taking advantage of consumers for too long.

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All The Truly Surprising Starbucks Menu Items From Around Latin America

Culture

All The Truly Surprising Starbucks Menu Items From Around Latin America

Starbucks

There are some things you can count on at any American Starbucks location, like the uniform flavor of Pike Place Roast, a sub-par bagel, or the baristas’ inability to spell Jennypher correctly. Outside of the U.S., however, the chain must make some menu adjustments based on local tastes.

Although the term “unusual” is certainly relative, here’s a glimpse of Starbucks’ best international offerings.

Maracuya Frappuccino – Mexico

Transport yourself to the Riviera Maya with this one. The people of Mexico can taste the exotic fruity flavor of passionfruit (aka maracuya) in their frappuccinos and save themselves from an actual trip to the beach.

Ponche Navideño – Mexico

Starbucks México on Twitter: "Recárgate de buenos deseos con una bebida de  temporada (pst, nosotros te invitamos la segunda 😁). Del 20 al 24 de  noviembre de 3 a 5 p. m.… https://t.co/hB3ziwEuDp"

Although most of us think as ponche as being just a seasonal option, several Starbucks locations in Mexico carry the traditional tasty treat all year long.

Banana Split Frappuccino – Mexico

You can take this one with or without coffee. It has all the banana and chocolate flavor of the beloved dessert and is topped with crushed waffle cones.

Envuelto Poblano – Mexico

Starbucks México | Envuelto poblano, el sabor de México en Starbucks -  YouTube

Lucuma Crème Frappuccino – Peru

Too bad they don’t serve it in the United States but I can understand why. This frappuccino is made with Lucuma, which is a tropical fruit from Peru, so it would be problematic to export it to different parts of the world. On the other hand, it makes the drink exclusive and adds one more reason to go to Peruvian Starbucks.

The taste of the fruit can be compared to maple flavor or butterscotch and this frappuccino itself is creamy and sweet as a Peruvian treat should be.

Barrita Nuez – Chile

Meet the famous humble cookie with a Chilean spin. You can taste the Barrita Nuez in Chile and enjoy the stuffing which consists of dulce de leche, nougat and walnuts.

Brigadeiro Frappuccino – Brazil

This frappuccino was born to honor the love of dulce de leche flavored ice creams which all Brazilians share. Dulce de leche is a traditional Latin American dessert that is prepared by slowly heating sweetened milk until it changes its color and gets a flavor similar to caramel.

Mini Donuts Nutella – Brazil

18 International Starbucks Items You'll Want To Travel For

Mini fried donuts filled with Nutella. Why are there no Nutella-filled treats at an American Starbucks?!

Pão de Queijo – Brazil

Brazil is often associated with skewers of meat, but there’s certainly a lot more cuisine variation. The fluffy balls of gluten-free cheese bread known as pão de queijo is a good example. The use of sour cassava starch dates back to the 1600s, before cheese was even in the picture, but today they’re available everywhere you turn in Brazil, from beachside stands to grandmothers’ kitchens to the Starbucks pastry case.

Dulce de Leche Frappuccino – Argentina

This creamy Frappuccino flavored with dulce de leche is pretty much what dreams are made of.

Cafe Tinto – Colombia

Starbucks coffee couldn’t be further than the working-class style of Colombian coffee called tinto, but as part of an effort to blend into its surroundings, the chain sells short cups of the stuff. It’s served black, and has a slightly thicker consistency than your average joe.

Churro Frappuccino – Latin America

Churro Frappuccino served at Starbucks all over Latin America includes cinnamon sprinkling, whipped cream, white mocha syrup, and a churro. 

What’s your favorite Starbucks items from across Latin America?

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