Things That Matter

TikTok’s ‘Check Your Privilege’ Challenge Will You Give You A Much Needed Reality Check

Among demanding justice for victims like George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, protestors and activists across the globe are demanding awareness of the privileges that protect non-Black people A new challenge trending on TikTok is pressing users to do just this and it’s worth your participation.

A TikTok user by the name of @boss_bigmamma recently asked users to examine their privileges, and the prejudices they may face due to their race.

Flipping the platform’s popular “put a finger down” game on its head, @boss_bigmamma (whose name is Kenya) used the game to show the discriminations she’s unjustly experienced as a black woman. She then asked other TikTokers to do the same.

Speaking with BuzzFeed News about the now-viral challenge, Kenya said “I know discrimination happens for many reasons, which is why I labeled it ‘check your privilege’ instead of ‘white privilege.” Kenya also said that people who have participated have said that they found the “Check Your Privilege” challenge relatable when it came to instances related to their religion and socioeconomic status.

Kenya’s “put a finger down” experiences as listed in the video are below.

– Put a finger down if you have been called a racial slur.

– Put a finger down if you’ve been followed in a store unnecessarily.

– Put a finger down if someone has crossed the street in order to avoid passing you.

– Put a finger down if you’ve had someone clench their purse in an elevator with you.

– Put a finger down if you’ve had someone step off of an elevator to keep from riding with you.

– Put a finger down if you’ve been accused of not being able to afford something expensive.

– Put a finger down if you’ve had fear in your heart when being stopped by the police.

– Put a finger down if you’ve never been given a pass on a citation you deserved.

– Put a finger down if you have been stopped or detained by police for no valid reason.

– Put a finger down if you have been bullied solely because of your race.

– Put a finger down if you’ve been denied service solely because of the color of your skin.

– Put a finger down if you’ve ever had to teach your children how not to get killed by the police.

Fortunately, quite a few people who are not of color have shared the results of their challenge.

Interracial couples are also highlighting their experiences as well.

Interracial couple Allison Holker and her husband Stephen ‘tWitch’ Boss shared the differences they experience due to the color of their skin.   

A Muslim Teen Has Filed A Discrimination Claim After A Starbucks Put “ISIS” On Her Cup

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A Muslim Teen Has Filed A Discrimination Claim After A Starbucks Put “ISIS” On Her Cup

KSTP / Via Facebook: watch

After enduring quite a bit of pain over receiving a cup with the word “ISIS” instead of her name, a Muslim teenager has filed a human rights complaint. According to the teenager whose name (as reported by Buzzfeed) is Aishah, on July 1 she and a friend went to a Starbucks located inside of a Target in St. Paul, Minnesota.

The 19-year-old said that a barista asked her to repeat her name when taking her order, but she was shocked by what she saw when she first received it.

Aishah says that she feels as if the incident happened because she was wearing a hijab and a face mask.

“I felt a lot of emotions, and shock was the main one because I actually couldn’t believe this was happening,” Aishah told BuzzFeed News.

Speaking about the incident, the deputy director of the Minnesota chapter of Council on American–Islamic Relations, Mohamed Ibrahim said “This is a reminder that Islamophobia is alive and present in our communities.” In an effort to address the issue, the group has made efforts to help Aishah file a complaint with the Minnesota Department of Human Rights.

In her interview with Buzzfeed, Aishah said the barista said that “ISIS” had been put on a cup because they hadn’t heard her name correctly. According to Buzzfeed, the Target employee who served Aishah said “they did not hear her name.”

When a manager attempted to explain to Aishah that people’s names are frequently misspelled on cups, she said that the explanations were “not credible or acceptable.”

“When somebody orders a drink at Starbucks — if the barista can’t spell the name, then they ask you to spell it,” Aishah explained in her interview that such a mistake had never happened with her order.

Aishah’s human rights complaint, claims a manager offered her a free drink and a $25 gift card for her troubles and had her escorted out by security.

Target, which oversees the Starbucks location where the incident happened, told BuzzFeed in a statement that it’s “very sorry for this guest’s experience at our store and immediately apologized to her when she made our store leaders aware of the situation.”

A spokesperson also explained that an internal investigation found “it was not a deliberate act but an unfortunate mistake” and that the company will offer additional training to the barista. According to Aishah, she has yet to hear from Target since she called the company to complain. She also has not heard from CAIR-MN.

Jaylani Hussein, the executive director of CAIR-MN, is calling for the barista and manager in question to be fired and for Target and Starbucks to reinvest in training for their employees. “We are hoping that bringing light to this incident will actually transform how Target and Starbucks and many other companies deal with such incidents,” Hussein said.

Unfortunately, it’s not the first time Starbucks has received such a complaint.

In August of last year, a man told a barista at a Philadelphia Starbucks that his name was Aziz. He was soon given a drink with the term “ISIS.”

“The barista mistakenly spelled it incorrectly,” a Starbucks spokesperson told NBC News at the time.

St. Louis Protesters Return To The Area Where A White Couple Drew Guns At Activists

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St. Louis Protesters Return To The Area Where A White Couple Drew Guns At Activists

Michael B. Thomas / Getty

In another display of a peaceful protests, activists returned the site of a St. Louis mansion owned by the white couple who drew out their guns during a calm demonstration last month. On Friday, chanting protesters returned to the home of Patricia and Mark McClosky, stopping just outside of their gate to protest for nearly 15 minutes.

During the peaceful protest over a dozen men in plain clothes walked the area inside of the gate.

According to Time Magazine, “One protester briefly straddled an iron gate as if he was going to jump over, but did not. No one threw anything and no one behind the gates showed aggression. One man on the McCloskeys’ balcony clapped along with the chanting protesters.” The crowd of protesters included a racially diverse crowd carrying signs calling to “Defund the Police” and underlining that “Black Lives Matter” and “No Justice, No Peace.” Chants included calls like “when Black lives are under attack, what do we do? Stand up, fight back,” and “this is what democracy looks like.”

According to reports, it is unknown if the McCloskeys were home. Soon after, the protestors left and marched to Interstate 64. Police had closed off the roads to traffic in both directions to allow protestors to march onto the highway. There the protestors sat on the highway for several minutes to honor the life of George Floyd who died on May 25 after a white police officer pressed his knee to his neck for over eight minutes.

The recent rally was organized by the group Expect Us and is among various demonstrations in St. Louis that have taken place in the weeks since George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis.

The McCloskeys first came to national attention in mid-June after they had been spotted aiming guns at protesters outside their home in St. Louis. Soon after the images of them began circulating Twitter dubbed them “Ken and Karen” and the stars of the “Mr. and Mrs. Smith” remake no one asked for. The incident occurred as protesters marched their way towards the home of Mayor Lyda Krewson who declared in a Facebook post that she would not support rising calls to defund the police. She also reportedly shared activists’ full names and addresses while reading off suggestions on how to better spend the city’s funds. After users ridiculed her online, Krewson apologized for her actions saying “Never did I intend to harm anyone or cause distress,” Krewson tweeted. “The update is removed and again, I apologize.”