Things That Matter

nurse dies from covid after filming a Heartbreaking Video For His Family

Credit: GoFundMe/Arturo and Antonio Hernandez

A coronavirus vaccine may be on it’s way, but COVID-19 is still tearing apart families and devastating communities. At this point, the emotional toll the pandemic has wreaked upon people is up there with the physical toll of the virus. Recently, a particularly tragic story out of Mexico made national headlines.

28-year-old nurse Sergio Humberto Padilla Hernandez was in the hospital, placed on a ventilator because of COVID-19. According to his friends and family, he had only 90% of his lung function.

Knowing first-hand the unpredictable nature of COVID-19, Padilla Hernandez recorded a video for his friends and family and posted it to Facebook.

Padilla Hernandez’s sister, Dolores, had already died from complications due to COVID-19 in August, so the young nurse wanted to be prepared in case the worst should happen.

“The moment of truth has arrived,” Padilla Hernandez said to the camera. “I will recover, God willing. We will move forward I will see you again, friends, family. I know you will be praying for me and my health, for my well-being. Whatever happens, you will always be looking out for my best interests, always. I love you and you are in my heart.”

Hours after filming the video, Padilla Hernandez passed away. He left behind his wife, Denise, and young son, Sergio III. His family is devastated.

Padilla Hernandez was eulogized on a GoFundMe page set up by his family.

Credit: GoFundMe/Arturo and Antonio Hernandez

“First and foremost, Sergio was a loving father to his son, Sergio III and a loving husband,” says the GoFundMe page. “Sergio lived life to the fullest. He was a devout Catholic and had a passion for helping others. Sergio was a dedicated nurse at the Municipal Hospital in Cuauhtemoc, Chihuahua, Mexico.”

The post went on to describe how Padilla Hernandez “worked tirelessly” to help others during the pandemic, which had “hit his home state of Chihuahua particularly hard.”

The GoFundMe page goes on to describe the “unimaginable hardships” Padilla Hernandez’s family is facing in the wake of his death.

“Unfortunately, his family has received very little assistance financially,” wrote Padilla Hernandez’s cousins. “Having lost their second child in the past 4 months to covid -19, our aunt and uncle are currently facing unimaginable hardships….They have put the family car up for sale and have sold nearly every possession of value leading up to Sergio’s passing.”

According to the GoFundMe page, Padilla Hernandez’s family is being crippled by lingering hospital bills from two family members having been hospitalized, funeral expenses, and general living expenses.

Padilla Hernandez’s passing is especially tragic because it illustrates how random and ruthless coronavirus is.

Despite the virus primarily being deadly to people with pre-existing conditions, once in a while, stories like this one circulate that throw our knowledge about COVID-19 into question.

This story is also tragic because, like many people who are gravely ill with COVID-19, Padilla Hernandez wasn’t able to say goodbye to his family in person. Due to the contagious nature of the virus, he was forced to say his final farewell through technology.

In the end, we hope that Padilla Hernandez’s family gets the closure and support they need from both their community and generous strangers around the world. Now is the time to come together and support one another.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

This Latina Is Making COVID Piñatas So People Can Take Their Pandemic Anger Out In a Fun Way

Fierce

This Latina Is Making COVID Piñatas So People Can Take Their Pandemic Anger Out In a Fun Way

Photo via the_pinata_shop/Instagram

Like many people, Carolina Tolladay Vidal’s COVID-19 hit her business hard. Tolladay Vidal runs a piñata business in Anchorage, Alaska, and with so many fiestas being canceled, her piñata sales were plummeting.

For fun, Carolina Tolladay Vidal created some COVID-virus-shaped piñatas to post to her social media page. And suddenly, orders for the quirky piñatas began to pile up.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Carolina Vidal (@the_pinata_shop)

Around July 4th of last year, Tolladay Vidal posted the following: “We’ve had it with you COVID19! This mama is tired of social distancing, postponing parties, canceling trips, juggling with kids 24/7, and this whole new lifestyle (I won’t lie, love the lazy days too!! So…prepare to die!! [laughing emoji] Want a chance to win this FILLED corona virus piñata? Stay tuned for details tomorrow!”

Her followers, dying to have a chance to unleash their pandemic-related anger in a fun way, immediately connected with her new product. “You are a creative genius!” wrote one of her followers. Another wrote: “Ja jajjajaja buenísima!!! [clapping hands emojis]”.

via the_pinata_shop/Instagram

Carolina Tolladay Vidal said that her inspiration for the COVID piñatas came from her own frustration at the way COVID has negatively impacted her life. “Many of the projects I had were moved to other dates,” she told Alaska Public Media. “Many were canceled.”

Tolladay Vidal explained that hitting the COVID piñatas was both fun and cathartic. “I think you really smash them and break them and hit them with meaning because it has been tough for everybody,” she said.

She also acknowledged how smashing the COVID piñatas was “bittersweet”–the sweetness from the piñata, of course. The bitterness from, well…being in a pandemic for over a year.

Carolina Tolladay Vidal learned the craft of piñata-making from her abuela when she was growing up in Mexico.

via the_pinata_shop/Instagram

“I have a memory of my grandma setting up all the grandchildren and helping her make a couple star pinatas with the seven points,” she told Alaska Public Media.

She created her own business, The Piñata Shop, when her daughter requested a very specific piñata for her birthday that CTV couldn’t find in stores. ““I had looked in the stores in town. I looked online, and I didn’t find anything,” she said. “And I thought, ‘Well, you know, it shouldn’t be so hard to make up a piñata.’”

A true jefa, Carolina Tolladay Vidal also runs an artisanal online jewelry store designing and selling Talavera jewelry called Folksy Bonitas. Creative genius, indeed!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Mexico Wins International Award For $100 Peso Note Featuring 17th-Century Nun Sor Juana

Culture

Mexico Wins International Award For $100 Peso Note Featuring 17th-Century Nun Sor Juana

Bank of Mexico

Over the last few years, Mexico has been updated its currency to make it more secure from counterfeiters and to highlight the country’s diverse history. One of the country’s newest bills is a $100 peso note featuring a 17th-Century female historical figure and it’s winning major international awards for its design and history.

Mexico’s $100-peso bill has been named banknote of the year for 2020 by the International Bank Note Society (IBNS). As printer and issuer of the note, the Bank of México beat 24 other nominees to the award, and the Sor Juana bill led the way from the start of the voting process.

The note features national heroine Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, with the monarch butterfly biosphere reserve on its reverse.

In its announcement the IBNS wrote: “Mexico’s award-winning entry may provide a template as other countries reconsider how they design and promote new banknotes.  The successful design in eye-pleasing red combines Hispanic architecture, a famous female Hispanic literary figure and a tribute to the world’s fragile ecosystem.”

Past bank note of the year recipients include Aruba, Canada, Uganda, the Faroe Islands, two time winner Switzerland and three time winner Kazakhstan, among others.

So who was Sor Juana and why was she important to Mexico?

Born in 1651, Sor Juana was a self-educated nun and intellectual renowned for her poetry, writing and political activism, who criticized the misogyny of colonial Mexico.

Beginning her studies at a young age, Sor Juana was fluent in Latin and also wrote in Nahuatl, and became known for her philosophy in her teens. Sor Juana educated herself in her own library, which was mostly inherited from her grandfather. After joining a nunnery in 1667, Sor Juana began writing poetry and prose dealing with such topics as love, feminism, and religion.

Mexico was up against 24 other countries in the nomination process.

In second place was Kate Cranston who appears on the Bank of Scotland’s 20 pound note. The businesswoman appears on the obverse and she is recognized for being the owner of the famous tea rooms inaugurated in 1903 and that today are a tourist attraction.

In third place there was a triple tie between the 20 pound note of the Ulster Bank of Northern Ireland whose design features flora and buskers. The one from the Bahamas of 5 dollars with the image of the junkanoo dancer, and the one of 50 dollars from Fiji.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com