Things That Matter

MIT Just Announced Their First Black Woman Student Body President

As a Massachusetts Institute of Technology undergrad, Danielle Geathers has already accomplished so much. And yet, recently she accomplished a feat that is making history. When the college student returns back to her classes at MIT this fall, she will be the first in the school’s 159- year history to do so as a Black female student body president.

Geathers, who is 22 years old, was recently elected by her student body as the president of the Undergraduate Association.

She will take up the torch as president alongside her running mate Yu Jing Chen. Speaking to MIT’s student newspaper The Tech, Geathers explained that it “didn’t surprise me that no black women had been president… Someone asked if the UA president was a figurehead role [during the debate]. I think no, but minimally, a black female in that role will squash every perception that MIT is still mostly white and male… Minimally, the immediate image of that will make MIT a more welcoming and inclusive place.”

Geathers, who is a major in mechanical engineering with a concentration in product design is also working on a minor in African and American diaspora studies.

Last year, Geathers served as the United Association’s diversity officer. Speaking about her initial efforts to run for president, Geathers said that she felt quite a bit of doubt and uncertainty about running. “Who am I to be president?” Geathers told The Tech about her mindset at the time. Fortunately, Geathers decided to run, “I talked to a couple of people who said, ‘That is the problem with America.’ People who care about equity never want to run for the main role because they think they’re not for it.”

Speaking about why her race and the one of her running mate had an important role in her campaign, Geathers said “We try to ignore the communities that people are from, but that’s what’s gonna make them good.”

It’s important to note that 6% of MIT’s undergraduate students are Black, and only 47% are women.

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Willow Smith Calls Out Her Mom Jada Pinkett For Enforcing Machismo While Growing Up With Brother Jaden

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Willow Smith Calls Out Her Mom Jada Pinkett For Enforcing Machismo While Growing Up With Brother Jaden

Jerod Harris / Getty

Machismo.

If you haven’t experienced it, you’ve definitely seen it. Most Latinas have watched it take form beneath the roof of their very own family homes and have experienced it first hand. From being glaringly aware of how much less time their brothers and papas spend in the kitchen to constantly being told to play less aggressively than the boys, most girls see it at a young age.

The children of celebrities are apparently no different.

Speaking about experiencing double standards in her own household, while growing up with her brother Jaden, Willow Smith got real on the Red Table Talk.

On this week’s Red Table Talk, Willow opened up about experiencing machismo with her mother, Jada Pinkett Smith and her grandmother Adrienne Banfield Norris.

“There is a difference between how Black moms treat their daughters and their sons,” Willow said in a clip. Willow went onto share that in her own experience it extended to “something as simple as getting up at the right time” where her mother would hurry her out of the house before school, Meanwhile Jaden was given more leniency.

“It was like, ‘You better get up. You better get dressed.’ I’d be in my room going like, ‘OK, I gotta get…,'” Willow says while acting stressed and hurried. “But then Jaden is there and she’d be like, ‘Uh, so are you ready to uh…’ and he’d be like, ‘Uh, maybe one moment.'”

Willow spoke about how machismo affected her while she would be “ready at the door” for school. While mimicking Jaden’s pace, and noting how slow he was going, Willow explained that he would be “getting his shoes on” with a lot less urgency.

“That’s true,” Jade laughed, “She might have a point. Because I was like she better be on it. You? Nah.”

Likely, Pinkett’s comment refers to her desire to see her daughter pay more attention and work harder in school.

“For me, I knew that she’s gonna have it twice as hard,” the “Girls Trip” star said. “I needed you to be strong because I know what this world is like for us as Black women… My fear for having a Black daughter and what I felt like she needed to be in this world put me in a position to be a little harder on her.”

And in ways, Pinkett’s reasoning comes from a place of well-meaning. After all, a study from The State of Black Women in Corporate America 2020  found that African-American women are repressed beyond belief in the United States underlining that Black women “who seek promotions at the same rate as white men, are only 58 percent as likely to be promoted to a managerial position and only 64 percent as likely to be hired into such positions. At a disadvantage from the beginning of their careers, Black women see the representation gap continue to widen and end up accounting for only 1.6 percent of vice presidents and 1.4 percent of C-suite executives, while white men hold 57 percent and 68 percent of those positions.”

Red Table Talk airs this Tuesdays at 9 a.m. PT/12 p.m. ET on Facebook Watch.

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This 12-Year-Old MENSA Member Is Starting His Sophomore Year of College But Stays Humble— ‘I Just Grasp Information Quickly’

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This 12-Year-Old MENSA Member Is Starting His Sophomore Year of College But Stays Humble— ‘I Just Grasp Information Quickly’

CBS

Twelve-year-old Caleb Anderson has a head on his shoulder that’s steering him towards a bright and brilliant future. Most kids Anderson’s age are diving headfirst into their 7th-grade year, he on the other hand is headed to college.

Back to college that is.

Anderson is currently enrolled at Chattahoochee Technical College as a sophomore.

From Marietta, Georgia, he’s on track to graduate with his bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering in two years. Speaking to CBS News for an interview the pre-treen remains humble and chalks up his success to being quick.

“I’m not really smart,” Caleb explained in his interview with the outlet. “I just grasp information quickly. So, if I learn quicker, then I get ahead faster.”

When it comes to pursuing his education, Anderson has his eyes set on a greater prize than just earning his bachelor’s degree. The 12-year-old is intent on heading off to Georgia Institute of Technology or the Massachusetts Institute for Technology. He’s hoping to eventually wind up with an internship at Tesla working for SpaceX founder Elon Musk.

“When I was like 1, I always wanted to go to space,” Anderson said in a separate interview with USA Today. “I figured that aerospace engineering would be the best path.”

Just twelve and Anderson has made quite a few other accomplishments.

At just 9 months old he learned how to do American Sign Language began reading just a few months later. “I have this distinct memory of going to a first-grade class and learning there, and everyone was way taller than me, because, you know, I was 2,” he explained to USA Today. “I could barely walk!”

According to his interviews, Anderson began solving math equations by the time he reached his second birthday and qualified for MENSA at just 3 years old. MENSA is the largest and oldest high IQ society across the globe. The non-profit organization is open to people who score at the 98th percentile or higher on a standardized intelligence test. Members have included the likes of Geena Davis, Nolan Gould of “Modern Family,” and Joyce Carol Oates.

Explaining what it is like to raise a genius, Anderson’s father Kobi WKYC that he realized his kid was special when he began to speak to other parents.

“As we started to interact with other parents, and had other children, then we started to realize how exceptional this experience was because we had no other frame of reference,” Kobi explained. “He has far surpassed me in math, so I can’t help him anymore. Seriously! He’s in calculus two now!”

When it comes to her son, Anderson’s mother says that she hopes other parents see him as an example and that he inspires other Black children.

“I think people have a negative perspective when it comes to African-American boys,” she explained. “There are many other Calebs out there… African-American boys like him. From being a teacher — I really believe that. But they don’t have the opportunity or the resources.”

Check out Anderson’s interview below!

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