Things That Matter

Roger Ailes Allegedly Asked Megyn Kelly To Twirl And She Said ‘God Help Me, I Did It’

There’s no denying that the new Jay Roach movie “Bombshell” is controversial. The film, which zooms in on the lead up to the events that led the women of Fox News to take down Roger Ailes. Already on the conveyor belt of Oscar’s buzz, the film’s depictions, of which includes a stand out performance by Charlize Theron as Megan Kelly, “Bombshell” is not without its disappointments.  The film works to promote a world in which Kelly is a tell-it-like-it-is journalist who puts powerful people in the hot seat– that is when Ailes is not at the helm. However it overlooks the ways in which the former host of The Kelly File used her prosecutorial experience to argue for racist conspiracy theories and cram down white ideals of Jesus and Santa. Miserably, it forgets, how in her years after her experiences at Fox, Kelly was ultimately pushed out of her position at ABC after defending the use of Blackface. 

The film, however, does do its part in lighting up the toxic work environment in which Roger Ailes promoted during his reign at Fox Network and which Kelly not only endured but ultimately her part in bringing him down from his thrown. Speaking out about her experiences with Ailes and her depiction in the film, Kelly recently sat down with a handful of other Ailes’ alleged victims for a roundtable discussion. 

The former Fox News anchor sat down with Aile’s alleged victim and talked about “Bombshell.”

‘Bombshell” / Lionsgate

In a video posted to her youtube channel, Kelly sat down for a roundtable interview with Juliet Huddy (former host of Fox News’ The Morning Show with Mike and Juliet), Rudi Bakhtiar (former Fox News reporter) and Julie Zann (former associate producer of Fox News Live). 

In a teaser clip of the interview, Kelly talks about  “the infamous spin inside of Ailes’ office” depicted in a scene starring Margot Robbie. In it, Ailes instructs Robbie’s character to “twirl” for him so that he can have a better look at her body. The scene is cringe-worthy and absolutely stomach-turning at best. The scene is reportedly an accurate depiction of a method Ailes would use to harass his employees. 

During her interview, Kelly asks the former Fox News hosts whether or not Ailes made them spin.

Most of the woman replied that he did, while the others say there were other forms of harassment. But when Kelly is asked by one of the women if she’d been told to do the twirl, the former ABC hosts replies  “I was asked to do the spin and God help me, I did. I know people think it’s like, ‘Oh yeah, you spin around.’ But I remember feeling like, ‘I put myself through school; I was offered partnership at Jones/Day, one of the best law firms in the world; I argued at federal courts of appeal all over the nation; I came here, I’m covering the United States Supreme Court; I graduated with honors in all of my programs and now he wants me to twirl?’ And I did it.” “It was like, if you don’t get how demeaning that is, I can’t help you.”

Zann, Bakhtiar and Huddy all said that they had similar interactions with Ailes to the one depicted onscreen while they worked at Fox News. 

Speaking in the interview Huddy said, “he never did the twirl thing to me. He would just say, ‘Turn around and let me see your ass. You’re too skinny, gain some weight.’ That kind of stuff.”  Meanwhile, Zann recalled that she was “was asked to twirl, and I did it.” 

 Bakhtiar also admitted that Ailes had asked her “to get up and turn around, and I didn’t do it. I didn’t get up and turn around, but he did ask me.” 

Speaking about the culture of sexual harassment at Fox, each of the women explained that they had worked with Ailes because they were fearful of losing their positions.

“This was the way it worked, everyone would tell you, ‘Don’t complain about sexual harassment because you’ll lose your job,’ ” Bakhtiar said in her trailer.

Last month, in response to the trailer, Kelly admitted the release of the film was particularly emotional for her. 

“Watching this picture was an incredibly emotional experience for me, and for those with whom I saw it,” Kelly wrote on Instagram “Sexual harassment is pervasive in this country; it can leave scars that do not heal. My heart goes out to those who’ve gone through it, who I hope might find some comfort in this story.” 

Watch the full trailer for “Bombshell” starring Charlize Theron here.

Transcripts Of George Floyd’s Death Find He Told Cops He Couldn’t Breathe More Than 20 Times: “Tell my kids I love them”

Things That Matter

Transcripts Of George Floyd’s Death Find He Told Cops He Couldn’t Breathe More Than 20 Times: “Tell my kids I love them”

Stephen Maturen / Getty

Over a month has passed since the death of George Floyd and while the aftermath of it seemed to spark a reaction that rattled those of us left behind to our cores, outrage over his death has slowed down. Likely you’re hearing less calls to end police brutality, seeing fewer signs that Black Lives Matter and most of your friends’ Instagram pages have likely returned to their usual blissfully ignorant states. Still, the fight for justice for George Floyd carries on and newly released transcripts of body camera footage show that Floyd had pled for his life and told officers at least 27 times that he couldn’t breathe before his death.

New transcripts from body camera footage of Floyd’s death have been filed in court.

Floyd (a truck driver, security guard, and father of five) told Minneapolis police officers over 27 times that he couldn’t breathe before he died. “I’m scared as fuck, man,” Floyd told the officers while they restrained them. “Tell my kids I love them. I’m dead.”

Transcripts of body camera footage show that Floyd told officers at least 27 times that he couldn’t breathe before passing out and dying.

“I can’t breathe for nothing, man,” Floyd told officers. “This is cold-blooded, man.” Ignoring Floyd’s cry for help, officer Derek Chauvin continued to pin Floyd down with his knee on his neck.

In the transcript, Chauvin can be heard saying to Floyd “Then stop talking. Stop yelling. It takes a heck of a lot of oxygen to talk.”

“I can’t breathe. I can’t breathe,” Floyd continued. “I’ll probably just die this way.”

The transcripts were filed by former Minneapolis police officer Thomas Lane in a move to have charges against him dropped.

Lane is one of four former police officers to be charged in Floyd’s death. Chauvin, Alexander Kueng, and Tou Thao are also being charged. Lane, Kueng, and Thao have been charged with aiding and abetting Chauvin in Floyd’s death. Meanwhile, Chauvin faces second-degree murder charges.

According to BuzzFeed, “In the motion looking to have charges against Lane dropped, attorneys argue he was a new officer on the force and following the cues from Chauvin.” At the time of Floyd’s death, Chauvin was not Lane’s field training officer. He had however been one in Lane’s precinct and had provided the Chauvin with instructions on how to deal with calls. Attorneys have pointed out that in the transcripts Lane called paramedics to the scene and asked if they should roll Floyd on his side while he was holding onto his legs.

In the transcript, Chauvin says “No, he’s staying put where we got him.”

According to transcripts, after Chauvin passed out bystanders pointed out Floyd was unresponsive. Still, Chauvin pinned him to the ground.

The Band Lady A Filed A Lawsuit Against Black Singer Who Used ‘Lady A’ Before Them After They Realized ‘Antebellum’ Was Racist

Entertainment

The Band Lady A Filed A Lawsuit Against Black Singer Who Used ‘Lady A’ Before Them After They Realized ‘Antebellum’ Was Racist

Terry Wyatt / Getty

In early July, the American country music group formerly known as Lady Antebellum announced that they would be dropping the name Antebellum as a response to the ongoing Black Lives Matter movement. They said the change was meant to also be a step towards bringing about inclusivity.

Now they’re being ridiculed for disrupting another Black woman’s art.

Now, as Lady A, the country music band has filed a lawsuit against a Black singer who has performed as Lady A for years.

On Wednesday, the Grammy-winning group raised the brows of many after expressing these sentiments when it was revealed that they had filed a lawsuit in federal court after negotiations with Anita White broke down. According to the Hollywood Reporter, “the band is seeking a ruling that their use of the trademark ‘Lady A’ does not infringe on White’s alleged trademark rights of the same name. The band is not seeking monetary damages.”

The group whose line up includes Hillary Scott, Charles Kelley, and Dave Haywood said last month that they regretted not having taken into consideration how the word antebellum relates to slavery.

White, who has performed as Lady A, complained publicly that the band never reached out to her before making the name change. White is a singer of blues and soul music for years.

The day after the band’s announcement, White who lives in Seattle, told Rolling Stone that she felt blindsided by the news. “This is my life. Lady A is my brand, I’ve used it for over 20 years, and I’m proud of what I’ve done… They’re using the name because of a Black Lives Matter incident that, for them, is just a moment in time… It shouldn’t have taken George Floyd to die for them to realize that their name had a slave reference to it.”

According to the lawsuit, the band applied for trademarks for the name “Lady A” back in 2010.

The lawsuits says that the trademark, had been submitted for the use of entertainment services and for use on clothing and no oppositions were filed by any person or entity.

“Today we are sad to share that our sincere hope to join together with Anita White in unity and common purpose has ended,” the group said in a statement. “She and her team have demanded a $10 million payment, so reluctantly we have come to the conclusion that we need to ask a court to affirm our right to continue to use the name Lady A, a trademark we have held for many years.”

According to Billboard, the band isn’t asking for money in the suit, only a court declaration that they can lawfully use the Lady A trademark as well as that its use of the trademark does not infringe on any rights White may have under state or federal law.