Things That Matter

Latinos In New York City Face More Layoffs Than Non-Latino Peers

The country is witnessing a high amount of mass layoffs across several industries in the face of the COVID-19 outbreak. Last week, 3.3 million Americans filed for unemployment, the highest number in history. Economists anticipate a 20 percent unemployment rate in the United States and some cities are already feeling the impact of these layoffs. In New York City, Latinos are facing more layoffs than their peers.

Latinos in New York City are facing higher levels of unemployment caused by COVID-19.

MSNBC Legal Analyst Maya Wiley tweeted about the foreseeable disproportionate impact these layoffs would have on minority communities. The tweet is ringing true as 41 percent of Latinos in NYC have been laid off from their jobs in response to the COVID-19 outbreak.

The Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy of the City University of New York conducted a survey with 1,000 participants. The survey found that roughly 4 out of every 10 Latinos in NYC have lost their job or someone in their household lost their job due to the health crisis. The survey found that 24 percent of white and Asian employees and 15 percent of Black employees reported losing jobs.

“It’s likely because the Hispanic community, many are in service jobs like restaurants or hotels,” Professor Scott Ratzan, a senior scholar at CUNY SPH, who led the survey, said in a statement. “We do the survey in English and Spanish, and [job loss is] higher among the Spanish-speaking community.” 

New York is the hardest-hit state in the U.S. with more than 30,000 confirmed cases of the virus.

New York state is facing the most extreme outbreak of the novel coronavirus when compared to the rest of the country. Governor Andrew Cuomo delivers an address to the media every morning and has told New Yorkers to brace for a serious viral outbreak. More than 30,000 New Yorkers have tested positive for COVID-19 and 325 deaths. Around 20,000 of those cases and about 280 of those deaths are in NYC.

Gov. Cuomo shared data that showed how the measures New York has taken to slow the spread is contributing to a slowing hospitalization rate. According to The New York Times, the hospitalization rate in New York state is slowing. On Sunday, the governor shared stat showing the rate doubling every two days. By Thursday, new data shows the hospitalization rate doubling every 4.7 days.

There are resources available for New Yorkers who are losing their jobs during the outbreak.

Some New Yorkers are reporting some delays in getting a hold of people in the unemployment offices. While the waits are long, it is worth being persistent.

According to NYC Emergency Management, there are several options for people who are being laid off during the COVID-19 pandemic. Unemployment assistance is available to everyone in New York state and the state has waived the 7-day wait period to alleviate the added pressures of COVID-19. Employees should know about the Shared Work program offered as an alternative to worker layoffs that provides some income assistance while workers have to work a reduced schedule.

The Office of Nightlife is also asking nightlife employees to fill out a survey about lost income in an attempt to help contractors, performers, workers, and business owners impacted by the closures.

READ: Latinas Are Sharing How They Protect Their Loved Ones From Coronavirus

Summer Is Here And Here’s How You Are Enjoying It Considering Everything Else Going On

Culture

Summer Is Here And Here’s How You Are Enjoying It Considering Everything Else Going On

Spencer Platt / Getty Images

There is no denying that COVID-19 is definitely changing a lot of our summer plans. However, there are a lot of plans this summer that we can still enjoy to the fullest, no matter what is happening in the world. Here are some of the ways you are making summer fun at home.

Nothing like a visit from the paletero.

Credit: yasislas / Giphy

There is nothing more summer than the paletero, according to @kclovesgg. He is the first person many of us fell in love with because he represented pure joy and always made us happy. Hearing that little bell clanking in the distance is enough to still make our hearts race.

On the other end, mami’s unending caldo is a summer staple.

Credit: Campbell’s

Our moms have this theory that it is beneficial for us to eat soup when it is hot outside. It isn’t to boot our immune systems or make us healthier. It is low key a way for them to save on the A/C. While Instagram users like @lulu_hern might remember it fondly, it is important to know that mom thought you would not feel as hot after eating such a hot meal. Therefore, she wouldn’t have to turn on the A/C.

There is something so important about the first carne asada of summer.

Credit: RobertRBlackmon / Giphy

We all know that papi, tío, abuelo, and every Latino man loves to be the carne asada house every summer. Fortunately, this summer, because of *waves frantically* everything, he can be the carne asada house every day. You better buckle up, @carmabelle91. Get ready to eat your family’s cooking all summer.

Some of you think margaritas are a summer drink when they are really acceptable at any time of year.

Literally, there is never a wrong time of year for a refreshing margarita because: tequila. While the freshness of lime juice and the blended ice to make for an exceptionally refreshing beverage for summer, don’t limit yourself. Enjoy your margaritas all year and make a special mix for those hot summer months, @cagirl_72.

The ability to go outdoor got a mention from you all because it’s the little things some times.

Credit: Partizan / Giphy

Being able to walk around outside is just one of the many joys we can enjoy without spending money. Being able to walk around your neighborhood or through nature is vital right now. We have been isolated at home for months and we have had to roll back openings because of spiking cases. Don’t let yourself go stir crazy. Walk around and breathe. @reynadelamiche knows what’s up.

Who doesn’t love a little baseball right now?

Credit: mlb / Giphy

The sporting world was one of the first to respond to COVID-19. All professional sports suspended their seasons when COVID-19 started to spread in the U.S. However, baseball is on its way back in the U.S. Despite the pandemic, the MLB will be restarting the season and taking actions to keep players safe, @riossr.alonso.

A big thing you want, according to IG comments, is justice for Breonna Taylor.

Several of you commented that you want to see justice for Breonna Taylor who was killed by police in Louisville, Kentucky. Her case has drawn a lot of attention because the police officers executed a no-knock warrant and entered the wrong address.

Taylor was shot and killed in her home and the police who killed the innocent woman have not been arrested. People have demonstrated across the country demanding justice for Breonna Taylor. Though the police have not been arrested, Breonna’s Law was passed by Louisville eliminating no-knock warrants.

READ: LGBTQ+ Swimwear To Rock This Summer If You’re Sick Of Being Constrained To One Look

This Is What Mexico Looks Like As It Reopens During A Global Pandemic

Things That Matter

This Is What Mexico Looks Like As It Reopens During A Global Pandemic

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Step outside into Mexico’s capital (home to more than 20 million people) and you’d be forgiven for not realizing we’re still in the midst of a global pandemic that’s killed more than half a million people.

As of this week, several Mexican states have entered the initial phase of reopening and Mexicans are taking full advantage of the newly found sense of ‘freedom’ – visiting restaurants, cafés and shops in droves. However, experts warn that Mexico will likely follow the dangerous path of the United States – which opened prematurely and is now having to shut down businesses once again as cases reach record levels.

Here’s an inside look into the daily reality of Chilangos (as residents of Mexico City are called) and what the future holds for the country amid Coronavirus.

Mexico City – along with 17 other states – have entered the first phase of a gradual reopening.

Despite being home to the largest number of active cases across Mexico, the capital joined 17 other states in a phased reopening this week. Mexico City lowered its contagion risk from a level red (the most extreme) to level orange, which permits some businesses to reopen.

However, Mexico City – on the day of the reopening – saw a record 5,432 new cases and 638 confirmed deaths. Mayor Sheinbaum said that the switch to orange was possible because hospital occupancy levels are at 59% and trending downwards. But to many, the government is prioritizing the economy over public safety and health. Several government officials insisted that it was safe to proceed to the reduced warning level but health experts disagreed.

The mayor stressed that if hospital occupancy levels go above 65% again, red light restrictions will be reinstated. She urged residents to continue to take precautions to reduce the risk of infection. People should continue to stay at home as much as possible and the use of face masks in public places remains mandatory.

Along with Mexico City, 17 other states moved into the orange phase of reopening – including tourist hotspots of Jalisco, Veracruz, Quintana Roo, and Yucatan.

The federal government instituted a traffic light system to simplify the risk management of Covid-19

Credit: omgitsjustintime/ Instagram

Shortly after the Coronavirus outbreak began, the federal government instituted a color-coded risk management system to simplify its messaging. With red being the highest risk level and green being the lowest, every state until June 15th was still in the red level.

As of July 1, 18 states are now in the orange level. This means that restaurants, cafés, and shops can begin to reopen with reduced capacity. Hotels and markets will also be allowed to resume service, meaning that tourism will likely begin to pick up again very soon.

President AMLO has been eager to get the economy reopened after it was reported that at least one million formal jobs have been lost and the country’s economy is expected to shrink by 8.8% this year.

On the first day of reopening, shops in Mexico City’s historic center were jammed full of shoppers.

Credit: Raul Hidalgo / Getty Images

The city’s historical center is a hub of economic activity. You can literally find pretty much anything you could ever want in these cobblestones streets. The district is home to more than 27,000 businesses and as of this week they’re now permitted to open once again. And resident wasted no time in hitting the shops.

Long lines formed outside shops with few people wearing masks and most stores not truly enforcing social distancing requirements. Some offered antibacterial gel and took people’s temperatures before allowing them to enter.

Officially, shops and businesses with an odd street number are permitted to open three days a week, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, whereas even-numbered shops can open Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.

In order to prevent crowds from accumulating and promote social distancing, 31 streets were converted into pedestrian-only zones.

Restaurants, cafés, and shopping centers are all open for business – with some protective measurements in place.

Credit: omgitsjustintime/ Instagram

Even before the official change to semáforo naranja, several restaurants and cafés were already offering dine-in service. But now restaurants are officially allowed to operate at limited capacity, while staff are required to wear masks and shields, and restaurants are’s allowed to play music or issue reusable menus.

Street markets, known as tianguis, will also be allowed to restart which will help many of the city’s informal workers. And the following week, department stores and shopping malls will also be allowed to reopen at 30% capacity and with limited hours.

Mexico is hardly finished with the Coronavirus threat – in fact, cases have been reaching record levels.

Credit: Covid.gob.mx

Although not yet at the levels seen in the U.S. or Brazil, Mexico has been struggling with its response to the Coronavirus pandemic. As of July 1, the country has had more than 225,000 confirmed cases and almost 28,000 deaths, with Mexico City being the epicenter of the nation’s outbreak.

And the worst doesn’t appear to be over. In a Covid-19 situation report published Monday, the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security noted that Mexico had reported a decreasing daily incidence for three consecutive days.

“However, Mexico does not yet appear to have reached its peak,” the report said. “Based on recent trends, we expect Mexico to report increasing daily incidence over the coming days. Mexico is currently No. 6 globally in terms of daily incidence,” it added.