Things That Matter

These Companies Are Hiring People To Offset The Loss of Income During The Various COVID-19 Lockdowns

There are various companies, both chains and local, that are hiring up extra people for their workforces. As the world sees more and more countries and cities go on lockdown, delivery companies, grocery stores, and restaurants are needing to hire more people to meet the growing demand. Here are some of the companies looking to hire people to wait out the COVID-19 pandemic that is currently sweeping the country.

Amazon is looking to bring in thousands of new employees across its operations.

Amazon wants to hire 100,000 more people to work in their warehouses, distribution centers, and Whole Foods grocery stores. According to a statement by Jeff Bezos, Amazon is hoping to be the place people who have recently lost their jobs can find temporary work as the world works to combat COVID-19. You can apply to Amazon here.

Dollar General is staying open to serve their customers throughout the crisis.

Dollar General is also stepping up to give those who recently lost their jobs a chance to generate some income. The company needs to hire people for its distribution center, private fleet networks, and store associates across the country. You can apply for jobs with Dollar General by clicking here.

Dollar Tree and Family Dollar are looking to hire people to ease economic constrictions from job lay offs.

The company currently has 25,000 positions across the country that need to be filled. The two chains, Dollar Tree and Family Dollar, are hoping to fill the positions as soon as possible to offer a lifeline to those who have been impacted by shutdowns. You can apply to Dollar Tree here and Family Dollar here.

Kroger, a parent company of grocery store chains, is working to get people back to work.

Credit: krogerco / Instagram

Kroger is working to maintain the same store hours but some are having to shift. In Atlanta, the stores are shifting to an 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. schedule to give the stores a chance to restock and get ready for customers. You can look for Kroger jobs here.

Pharmacies, like Walgreens, are also giving people a chance to bridge the financial gap caused by COVID-19.

Walgreens is looking to fill around 9,500 people for roles across the country. Walgreens has also joined a number of stores in implementing senior citizen shopping hours and guidelines. These hours give the population most vulnerable to the worst of the coronavirus a chance to shopping peacefully. You can look for Walgreens jobs here.

GE Healthcare is trying to increase its output of medical equipment.

GE Healthcare is looking to fill positions so that the company can create, distribute, and provide necessary medical equipment to people. You can check out GE Healthcare jobs here.

Walmart is taking steps to hire people who are facing layoffs right now.

Walmart is looking to hiring 150,000 people in sales, fulfillment centers, distribution centers, and clubs by the end of May. The largest employer in the world is staying open to cater to people during the COVID-19 crisis. You can check out Walmart jobs here.

READ: Cuban Doctors Arrive In Italy To Combat The Coronavirus– Demonstrate History Of Global Humanitarian Commitment

Street Food Vending And Playing With Are Two Ways To Make Some Extra Cash If You Need Some

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Street Food Vending And Playing With Are Two Ways To Make Some Extra Cash If You Need Some

mitú

Side hustles are the lifeline for some of our friends and family. If you think about it hard enough. You will be able to think of someone in your life who makes most of their money from their side hustle. Well, mitú wanted to know more so we went to the streets to talk to people about their various side hustles.

Who knew that fire dancing was something people would consider a side hustle?

So far, “Side Hustle” co-hosts Sasha Merci and David Alvare have explored a few side hustles that were unexpected. There was the luchador who add some comedy to his costume to stand out. There was also the professional cuddler that we still can’t stop thinking about. She makes $120 an hour just cuddling.

Now, Merci and Alvarez are talking with two more entrepreneurs about their own side hustles that will leave some of you speechless. One of them has to do with food and the other has to do with fire.

Luis Jauregui turned his love for food into the food cart known as Jauregui’s Cravings.

“Nobody was really selling this at all,” Jauregui tells Alvarez. “Anywhere that you see this, you’re not going to see a food cart that’s mobile on the sidewalks. I saw that everyone was selling that (tacos and tamales). If you go here, there are like 5 tamaleros selling tamales. On the other street, there’s like two more.”

Jaurgeui adds: “Nobody was supporting me. It was only her since the very beginning. To be honest, I thought she was going to make fun of me or be like, ‘Nah. Don’t worry about. Just go get a job or something.’ But she was like, ‘If that’s your dream and you chase it, just got for it.'”

Andres Trevino is using his courage to play with fire.

“I had gone to this crazy party in the desert,” Trevino explains to Merci. “I was seeing these crazy people and they were spinning fire and I immediately wanted to do it. I walked up to a guy and I asked him if he would teach me. He was like, ‘Here. Play with it. Nobody taught me. Just go on YouTube.’”

Trevino adds: “It’s trial and error. Well, you know, if you play with fire you do get burned. There’s no shocker there. But, you want to take it very seriously. But, yeah. I’ve burned myself a couple of times.”

READ: ‘Side Hustle’ Episode 2: Nude Modeling And Friend Rentals

Covid-19 Cases Surge In Meat-Processing Plants As COVID-19 Spreads In Rural America

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Covid-19 Cases Surge In Meat-Processing Plants As COVID-19 Spreads In Rural America

David Ryder / Getty Images

Meat processing plants have been at the center of the COVID-19 response conversation. The plants, many located in the Midwest, are crucial to the food supply chain to feed the country but outbreaks at these facilities have threatened that supply chain. Some closed to save the health of their employees but an executive order, with limited power, allowed for these plants to stay open.

The meat-processing industry is surprisingly small with 4 plants providing 80 percent of the meat in the U.S.

Workers at meat-processing plants have been testing positive for COVID-19 in April. The spread was quick and some plants began to shut down in late April and early May to avoid massive outbreaks in their plants. In early May, several plants closed to handle the outbreaks, including Tyson Foods, one of the largest pork-processing companies in the U.S.

New data shows that coronavirus cases are increasing in the U.S. meat processing plants. The numbers have tripled to 15,000 with 63 meat plant workers dying from the virus. Within a month, Tyson Foods, the country’s largest meat processing company, saw its number of coronavirus cases jump from 1,600 to 7,000.

The number of cases has spiked within meat-processing plants that have reopened.

In late April, President Trump signed an executive order that some people misinterpreted as ordering meatpacking and processing plants to remain open. What President Trump did was to order that meat and poultry plants are essential according to the Defense Protection Act of 1950. The DPA is used to compel manufactures to create “scarce and critical material essential to the national defense.”

The second thing the order did was to give the authority to Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue. Perdue is responsible for keeping the meat processing and packing plants running during the pandemic. He has to adhere to guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

As with some states, there are discrepancies showing in the data being released by the meat plants.

In North Carolina, the Smithfield meat-packing plant in Tar Heel is being elusive with their number of positive coronavirus cases. They are being assisted in the lack of transparency by state and local officials, according to The New York Times.

“There has been a stigma associated with the virus,” Teresa Duncan, the director of the health department in Bladen County, where the Smithfield plant is located, told The New York Times. “So we’re trying to protect privacy.”

A poultry plant in Arkansas was the cause of an outbreak in a Latino community.

In Arkansas, a community saw a spike in cases within the Latino community. The cases were coming from employees, their families, and their social circles. The one poultry plant resulted in 151 new cases in the Latino community of Dardanelle, Arkansas.

READ: Another Man Has Died Of Covid-19 In ICE Custody And The Agency Still Lacks Any Plan To Prevent More Deaths