Things That Matter

Bernie Sanders Leads Democratic Candidates In Latino Supporters And Donations

The Democratic primary is heating up with the Iowa caucus and the New Hampshire primary now behind us. During the campaign, some candidates have shown their support for the Latino community and it shows in the number of donations the candidates are receiving. The winner of the Latino donations, so far, is Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders.

Latinos have donated more than $23 million to Democratic presidential candidates in 2019.

Credit: Plus Three

The study, done by Plus Three, analyzed Act Blue donation data to determine the Latino donations in the 2020 Democratic primary. The data showed that Bernie Sanders outraised the rest of the candidates in the field with Latino supporters every month in 2019. There were four months where Sanders raised more than $1 million from Latino supporters.

Sen. Sanders earned a majority of the Latino donations.

Of the $23.7 million donated by Latinos to the Democratic presidential candidates, $8.3 million went to the Bernie Sanders campaign. The contributions came from 1,713,678, according to Plus Three.

However, the study also shows that the Democratic Party is lost significant Latino support after two candidates dropped out.

Credit: Plus Three

One of the key factors in the drop in Latino support is a response to Beto O’Rourke and Julián Castro leaving the race. The two candidates received $6.3 million from 315,000 Latino supporters, according to the study. O’Rourke raised $2.6 million dollars from 113,281 contributors while Castro raised $1.8 million dollars from 94,137 contributors.

The loss of Latino supporters signals a lack of Latino voters moving to other candidates as the field narrows. Since the two candidates left the field, Latino donations and contributions dropped 24 percent.

Latinos have become an important and elusive voting bloc.

Credit: Element5 Digital / Unsplash

The Latino voting power is fast-growing. Thirty-two million Latinos will be available to vote in the 2020 general election in November. This will be the first time in history that the Latino voting power will exceed the Black voting power. The trend in voting power is making the Latino community more and more important in elections.

However, Latinos are diverse and complicated as a voting bloc. The Latino community includes all races and religions. Ideology among the Latino community changes based on the voter and their experiences. In California, for example, 39 percent of Latinos identify as liberal, 30 percent consider themselves to moderate, and 31 percent of Latino voters identify as conservative.

Voting habits are also different between generations. In Florida, more and more younger Cubans and Cuban-Americans are registering with the Democrat Party signaling a departure from their conservative parents and grandparents. A study by Florida International University, shows a trend of the Cuban and Cuban-American population in southern Florida trending more liberal.

The FIU study, conducted after the 2018 midterms, Cubans who came to the U.S. before 1980 are 72 percent Republican, 11 percent Democratic, and 17 percent no party affiliation. Meanwhile, Cubans 18 to 39 are 35 percent Republican, 23 percent Democratic, and 40 percent no party affiliation.

Sanders has a commanding lead with Latino voters, and that is the vote that everyone is after.

Super Tuesday is around the corner and the future of the Democratic nomination will really start to take shape.

READ: The Details Of Bernie Sanders Immigration Plan Are Out And Here’s What He Wants To Do

Latino Voters Deliver Bernie Sanders Major Victory In California Primary

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Latino Voters Deliver Bernie Sanders Major Victory In California Primary

berniesanders / joebiden / Instagram

Fourteen states voted on Super Tuesday and Vice President Joe Biden led the pack of Democratic candidates. Bernie Sanders, despite a decisive win in California, now has the second-highest delegate count. Latino voters made their voices heard, especially in California where they delivered Sanders a strong victory.

Sen. Bernie Sanders won the biggest Super Tuesday prize: California.

According to Vox, Latinos in California largely supported Sen. Sanders. Forty-nine percent of Latino voters in the Golden State voted for Sanders with 12 percent voting for Vice President Joe Biden. There was a clear generational divide in support for Sen. Sanders. Seventy-one percent of Latinos 18-29 supported Sen. Sanders while 35 percent of Latinos 45-64 supported the Vermont senator.

Sen. Sanders won more than a million votes in California earning him 135 delegates.

As of noon March 4, 87 percent of precincts were reporting giving Sen. Sanders a commanding 9-point lead over Vice President Biden. Leading up to the election, Sen. Sanders was polling highest among Latino voters and it seems Latinos came out to vote and gave Sen. Sanders the advantage he needed to win California.

However, young voters, Sen. Sanders’s key voters, turned out in smaller numbers during the primary.

The number of young voters in Alabama, South Carolina, and North Carolina was down compared to the 2016 primary elections. In Alabama, 10 percent of voters were 17-29 this year compared to 14 percent in 2016. Young voters are the key demographic for Sen. Sanders and the lack of voting participation from young voters contributed to Sen. Sanders’s lackluster night.

Vice President Biden pulled off an unexpected and impressive performance.

Vice President Biden won 10 of the 14 states during Super Tuesday, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s home state Massachusetts. Black voters in the southern states came out in huge numbers to cast their ballots for Vice President Biden. Six states are voting in their primaries next week and there are 352 more delegates up for grabs that week. A candidate needs 1,991 candidates to secure the nomination outright before the convention. So far, Vice President Biden leads with 566 delegates and Sen. Sanders is a close second with 501.

READ: Bernie Sanders Leads Democratic Candidates In Latino Supporters And Donations

Bernie Sanders Faces Backlash For Saying That Not ‘Everything Is Bad’ In Castro’s Cuba

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Bernie Sanders Faces Backlash For Saying That Not ‘Everything Is Bad’ In Castro’s Cuba

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Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is once again touting what he sees as the benefits of Fidel Castro’s Cuba. The Vermont senator first made comments praising parts of Castro’s Cuba in a 1985 interview. Now, 15 years later, Sen. Sanders is standing behind his idea that not everything is bad in Cuba in a 60 Minutes interview.

Senator Bernie Sanders is facing backlash from critics after his 60 Minutes interview because of his comments on Fidel Castro’s Cuba.

In the 1980s, Sen. Sanders was caught on camera more than once praising parts of the Castro regime in Cuba. He points to the health care and education systems as parts of the government that works for Cuban people. The comments resurfaced in 2019 and caused a backlash against the senator in the Cuban diaspora, whose pains are still fresh from the overthrow of the government.

Now, in a “60 Minutes” interview, the Vermont senator has doubled down on his comments that some of the Cuban government is good.

Anderson Cooper – “What is Democratic Socialism?”

Bernie Sanders – “When Donald Trump was a private businessman in New York, he got $800 million in tax breaks and subsidies to build luxury housing. That’s called Socialism. What Democratic Socialism is about is saying, ‘Let’s use the federal government to protect the interest of working families.’”

BS – “We’re very opposed to the authoritarian nature of Cuba. But, you know, it’s simply unfair to say that everything is bad. You know, when Fidel Castro came into office, you know what he did? He had a massive literacy program. Is that a bad thing, even though Fidel Castro did it?”

AC – “There were a lot of dissidents imprisoned in Cuba.”

BS – “That’s right and we condemn that. Unlike Donald Trump, let’s be clear. I do not think that Kim Jung Un is a good friend. I don’t trade love letters with a murdering dictator. Vladimir Putin, not a great friend of mine.”

The comments have sparked some backlash on social media from Cubans and Cuban-Americans.

Credit: @marcorubio / Twitter

Senator Marco Rubio, who is Cuban-American, has been a vocal opponent of Socialism. He has used the crisis in Venezuela to solidify his point about the dangers of the government system he believes Sen. Sanders wants to start in the U.S. Yet, Sen. Sanders’s point is not that the Castro regime is good. In the “60 Minutes” interview, the senator made it clear that he does not support the Castro regime and the brutality it caused for the Cuban people. However, he does believe there are things we can learn from the Caribbean island about offering health care and education to the population.

One point of contention with the senator’s comments is that the Cuban people didn’t fight back because of the new programs.

Credit: @DebbieforFL / Twitter

The Castro regime is known to have oppressed dissidents and political opponents. Speaking out against the authoritarian regime was not safe. People were jailed, killed, and exiled for standing up to Castro’s rise to power. Families fled the island and settled around the world to escape what they saw as a justifiable threat to their lives and sovereignty.

Some people are sharing personal stories of their families’ treatment under the Castro regime.

Credit: @GiancarloSopo / Twitter

The generational trauma created by the Castro regime is still felt today. Some people used Sen. Sanders’s comments as a chance to tell a fuller story of the government some have praised for their social services.

A clip of President Barack Obama speaking on the same social issues in Cuba is also circulating.

President Obama worked tirelessly to reopen relations between the U.S. and Cuba. He was the first sitting president to visit the island when it was announced that diplomatic ties were reopened between the two countries. Part of being able to open those relations was eliminating the “wet foot, dry foot” policy that allowed Cuban nationals to stay in the U.S. after migrating. This allowed Cubans to be deported back to Cuba, something that hadn’t happened since Cubans first started to flee their homeland. In response, Cubans illegally in the U.S. have been subjected to ICE raids and detention for the first time because of President Donald Trump’s increasing escalation against the immigrant community.

There is a lot of concern from Democratic supporters that the comment could cost the party Florida in the general election if Sen. Sanders is nominated.

Credit: @IvanBrandon / Twitter

The Cuban and Cuban-American population in Florida is a key demographic to win the state in general elections. His comments cherry-picking what is and is not good about the Cuban government is having a resonating effect in Florida. Cuban Democrats and Republicans in the state are untied in rebuking the senator’s comments as glossing over the true victimization and terror millions faced.

READ: Bernie Sanders Praises Fidel Castro And His Revolution In Cuba During Resurfaced Interview From 1985