Things That Matter

An ‘Officer Karen’ Broke Into Tears Because She Didn’t Recieve Her McMuffin Fast Enough

A viral video showing a cop breaking down in tears after waiting a little longer than expected for her McDonald’s order has fueled questions about whether we can trust the police.

In a recent clip of an office has gone viral after she expressed nervousness over waiting too long for her order.

The officer named Stacey, who identified herself as a 15-year veteran of the police force, broke out in tears after she was made to wait to pick up her mobile order for a McMuffin, hashbrowns, and coffee at a McDonald’s in Richmond Hill, Georgia. In a video she took of her own choosing, Stacey can be seen crying as she explains her story by starting off by sharing that she put in an order through the mobile app and that she was upset about having to wait.

“And I’m waiting. And I’m waiting. And I’m waiting,” Stacey explained before underlining that she had been feeling hungry for some time. She also shared that after she arrived she was asked to pull over to the side so that an employee could deliver her food. Eventually, an employee came out to serve her but tragically only delivered her coffee order.

“That’s all she hands me is the coffee,” Stacey continued her story, breaking down into tears. “I said, ‘Don’t bother with the food because right now I’m too nervous to take it’ It doesn’t matter how many hours I’ve been up. It doesn’t matter what I’ve done for anyone. Right now, I’m too nervous to take a meal from McDonald’s because I can’t see it being made.” She then went onto ask people to “Please, just give us a break. I don’t know how much more I can take.” She also said that her anxiety is at her mos high and asked people to say “thank you” when they see police officers.

A Twitter user, who identifies as a conservative Trump supporter in her profile, posted the clip which has now been viewed over 11 million times.

Supporters of the officer are suggesting that the delay in her delivery was done in reaction to increasing disgust of police brutality and calls for justice of police victims  Breonna Taylor and George Floyd who were both killed by law enforcement.

Officer Karen’s tearful rant comes after police unions in New York City accused workers at a Shake Shack of poisoning milkshakes ordered by three officers.

Police ultimately determined that the Manhattan fast-food joint had not intentionally tainted the drinks.

“After a thorough investigation by the NYPD’s Manhattan South investigators, it has been determined that there was no criminality by shake shack’s employees,” Chief of Detectives Rodney Harrison wrote in a tweet on Tuesday.

Many have been quick to point out that Officer Stacey’s reaction to her food delay is OTT especially considering that she has no idea what is going on behind the counters of McDonald’s.

“She thinks fast-food workers have time to delay her order intentionally as if they aren’t constantly being micromanaged, or that they can even keep track of who had a single egg McMuffin,” wrote one.

“There’s nothing rational about a cop having delusions that her McMuffin is being poisoned because a McDonald’s crew is running behind. Much like the irrational cops who thought they were poisoned by Shake Shack, she shouldn’t have a gun until she’s independently evaluated,” another user remarked.

And here’s just another reason why we need #policereform.

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She Moved Up The Ranks From Janitor To Nurse Practitioner, Now She’s Viral

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She Moved Up The Ranks From Janitor To Nurse Practitioner, Now She’s Viral

Talk about a dream fulfilled.

For ten years, Jaines Andrades harbored her desire to move up from her custodial position at Baystate Medical Center in Springfield, Massachusetts to nurse. Now, ten years later, as an RN she’s excelled well past her drams.

Andrades worked her way through nursing school while working at Baystate Medical in Springfield, Massachusetts, as a janitor.

Ten years ago, Andrades accepted a position as a custodial staff member at Baystate Medical Center with big dreams of being a nurse. Born to Puerto Rican parents Andrades moved from her family home in Springfield, MA in 2005 when she was 14 years old. From there she and enrolled as a student at Putnam Technical-Vocational Academy with hopes of moving up the ranks as a nurse.

“As I got older and approached graduation I just didn’t see how a little girl like me could ever become a lawyer. I didn’t see it as something that was possible for me, so I got discouraged from the idea,” Andrades explained according to Masslive.com.

That all changed after she struck up a conversation with a nurse during a doctor’s visit for her mother. According to Andrades, the nurse tipped her off on the benefits of nursing. “He told me about the program to become a nurse, and, the more he talked, I just thought, ‘Yeah, I can do this.’ It’s a respectable profession, and I could provide for myself financially, so the idea grew from there.”

Soon after she enrolled at Holyoke Community College, ticked off all of her pre-requisites and a handful of introductory nursing classes. Then, in 2010, she transferred to Elms College.

The same year she transferred, Andrades applied for a job in Baystate’s Environmental Services Department and became a custodian at the hospital.

Facebook

“It’s tough to be the person that cleans. If I had to go back and do it again, I would. It’s so worth it,” Andrades explained in an interview with WBZ-TV.

In a Facebook post, Andrades wrote about her journey from hospital custodian to nurse practitioner and posted a picture of all three of her IDs.

Andrades’ story went viral after she shared her experience to Facebook.

Speaking about her journey from custodian to nurse practitioner, Andrades shared a picture of all three of her IDs.

“Even if it was cleaning, as long as I was near patient care I’d be able to observe things. I thought it was a good idea,” the RN explained in her interview before sharing that her favorite part of being a nurse has been her ability to provide patients with comfort. “I just really love the intimacy with people.”

“Nurses and providers, we get the credit more often but people in environmental and phlebotomy and dietary all of them have such a huge role. I couldn’t do my job without them,” she went onto explain. “I’m so appreciative and like in awe that my story can inspire people,” Andrades told WBZ-TV. “I’m so glad. If I can inspire anyone, that in itself made the journey worth it.”

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Here’s How You Can Help Daunte Wright’s Family After He Was Killed By Police

Things That Matter

Here’s How You Can Help Daunte Wright’s Family After He Was Killed By Police

Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Police have taken another Black man’s life, this time it’s 20-year-old Daunte Wright. Protests have broken out in cities across the country as the nation reacts to the killing of yet another young Black man.

But as the nation reacts to the murder, Wright’s family – his mother and child – need all the support they can get right now and thankfully there are many ways that we can all be better allies while helping support the family that Wright leaves behind.

Daunte Wright is the third high-profile police murder in Minneapolis.

Daunte Wright was driving to his older brother’s house with his girlfriend on Sunday afternoon, when police pulled him over for expired tags. Police said they found an existing warrant for Wright’s arrest and attempted to handcuff him.

Bodycam footage revealed Officer Kim Potter shot Wright when she claimed to be reaching for her taser. He died on the scene, just 10 miles from where former police officer Derek Chauvin is on trial for the death of George Floyd.

According to CNN, Daunte’s death is at least the third high-profile death of a Black man at the hands of police in Minnesota in the last five years. And Daunte Wright’s death comes less than a year after the police killing of George Floyd, which sparked protests around the world.

Daunte Wright leaves behind a family still struggling with such an immense loss.

Daunte’s mother, Katie Wright, spoke out about the fear he experienced before his death. Daunte called her after the police pulled him over, at the suggestion of his older brother. “I know my son was scared. He’s afraid of the police, and I just seen and heard the fear in his voice. But I don’t know why, and it should have never escalated the way it did,” Katie told Good Morning America on April 13.

According to Katie, Daunte believed he was getting pulled over for his hanging air fresheners, then she heard “scuffling” and an officer told him to hang up the phone. “I tried to call back three, four times and the girl that was with him answered the phone and she said that they shot him and he was lying in the driver’s seat unresponsive.”

If you’d like to help support Daunte’s family and demand justice, below are a few resources and action items:

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