Things That Matter

28-Year-Old Nurse Dies From COVID-19 Hours After Filming a Heartbreaking Video For His Family

Credit: GoFundMe/Arturo and Antonio Hernandez

A coronavirus vaccine may be on it’s way, but COVID-19 is still tearing apart families and devastating communities. At this point, the emotional toll the pandemic has wreaked upon people is up there with the physical toll of the virus. Recently, a particularly tragic story out of Mexico made national headlines.

28-year-old nurse Sergio Humberto Padilla Hernandez was in the hospital, placed on a ventilator because of COVID-19. According to his friends and family, he had only 90% of his lung function.

Knowing first-hand the unpredictable nature of COVID-19, Padilla Hernandez recorded a video for his friends and family and posted it to Facebook.

Padilla Hernandez’s sister, Dolores, had already died from complications due to COVID-19 in August, so the young nurse wanted to be prepared in case the worst should happen.

“The moment of truth has arrived,” Padilla Hernandez said to the camera. “I will recover, God willing. We will move forward I will see you again, friends, family. I know you will be praying for me and my health, for my well-being. Whatever happens, you will always be looking out for my best interests, always. I love you and you are in my heart.”

Hours after filming the video, Padilla Hernandez passed away. He left behind his wife, Denise, and young son, Sergio III. His family is devastated.

Padilla Hernandez was eulogized on a GoFundMe page set up by his family.

Credit: GoFundMe/Arturo and Antonio Hernandez

“First and foremost, Sergio was a loving father to his son, Sergio III and a loving husband,” says the GoFundMe page. “Sergio lived life to the fullest. He was a devout Catholic and had a passion for helping others. Sergio was a dedicated nurse at the Municipal Hospital in Cuauhtemoc, Chihuahua, Mexico.”

The post went on to describe how Padilla Hernandez “worked tirelessly” to help others during the pandemic, which had “hit his home state of Chihuahua particularly hard.”

The GoFundMe page goes on to describe the “unimaginable hardships” Padilla Hernandez’s family is facing in the wake of his death.

“Unfortunately, his family has received very little assistance financially,” wrote Padilla Hernandez’s cousins. “Having lost their second child in the past 4 months to covid -19, our aunt and uncle are currently facing unimaginable hardships….They have put the family car up for sale and have sold nearly every possession of value leading up to Sergio’s passing.”

According to the GoFundMe page, Padilla Hernandez’s family is being crippled by lingering hospital bills from two family members having been hospitalized, funeral expenses, and general living expenses.

Padilla Hernandez’s passing is especially tragic because it illustrates how random and ruthless coronavirus is.

Despite the virus primarily being deadly to people with pre-existing conditions, once in a while, stories like this one circulate that throw our knowledge about COVID-19 into question.

This story is also tragic because, like many people who are gravely ill with COVID-19, Padilla Hernandez wasn’t able to say goodbye to his family in person. Due to the contagious nature of the virus, he was forced to say his final farewell through technology.

In the end, we hope that Padilla Hernandez’s family gets the closure and support they need from both their community and generous strangers around the world. Now is the time to come together and support one another.

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Comedian Joe ‘El Cholo’ Luna Dies From COVID-19 Just Days After He Posts a Video Describing His ‘Journey’ on Instagram

Things That Matter

Comedian Joe ‘El Cholo’ Luna Dies From COVID-19 Just Days After He Posts a Video Describing His ‘Journey’ on Instagram

Photo: joeelcholo/Instagram

Another day, another tragic COVID-19 related death. On November 3rd, a Los Angeles comedian Joe “El Cholo” Luna passed away from the coronavirus.

Throughout his battle with COVID-19, Luna documented his struggle through social media.

Just two days before he passed away, Luna posted a video on Instagram chronicling his COVID-19 journey. He shared the video with his followers for “educational purposes”. In the video, Luna got extremely candid about the realities of the deadly illness.

“Let me tell you, man, when I would hear people talk about what COVID did to them, I always said to myself, ‘You know what? I doubt it’s that bad’,” he says in the video. “I’ll tell you guys right now, I’ve been putting up a fight. I’ve been fighting for my life for the last week or so, man. This COVID shit is no joke.”

Luna described his symptoms: losing his taste and smell, fainting, having trouble breathing, fevers, chills, chest pains. He also contracted pneumonia. At one point, he even lost consciousness.

Luna explained that he had been discharged from the hospital a few days ago simply to be taken back to the hospital via an ambulance. “I ended up passing out,” he said in the clip.

He also revealed that his mother, his girlfriend, and his children had tested positive for the virus. His mother was also hospitalized with COVID-19 and pneumonia.

Luna was a diabetic and had previously lost both of his legs due to the disease. According to him, COVID-19 hit him especially hard due to his preexisting conditions.

Luna’s family and community mourn the loss of a vibrant man who had been full of humor and light when he was alive.

“We are currently all mourning him because not only was he a great son, dad, hubby but also a best friend to many of us,” wrote Blanca Castro on his GoFundMe page.

She continued: “He fought hard after losing both legs to stay ok. He fought hard with the everyday pain. He was my comedian superhero. Even when he was hurting he managed to put a smile on our faces.”

Because of his father’s bright spirit, his family insists on celebrating his death the way he would have wanted: with humor. “For his funeral, he doesn’t want anyone crying so we’re going to put together a show because that’s what he would have wanted,” said his son, Jose Talavera, to Fox 11 News. “He wanted people to be laughing and having fun,” said Talavera.

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Topo Chico Just Released Its Alcoholic Hard Seltzer Lineup And It’s Already On People’s Shopping Lists

Culture

Topo Chico Just Released Its Alcoholic Hard Seltzer Lineup And It’s Already On People’s Shopping Lists

Topo Chico / Coca Cola Company

It’s safe to say that pretty much anything sparkly is having a moment. What started off as the sparkling water craze a few years ago with brands like LaCroix and Bubly, has now moved onto hard seltzer.

With all the commotion it’s hard not to miss the fizzy drink sensation taking over our mini-fridges and supermercados across the country. Now, Coca Cola (which owns iconic the iconic Mexican brand, Topo Chico) is getting in on the trend with its own Topo Chico hard seltzer.

And although I’m not one to usually follow trends, this one seems like one that many of us will want to get behind.

Topo Chico is stepping it up with a new line of alcoholic hard seltzers.

Following in the footsteps of hard seltzer mega weights like White Claw and Truly, Topo Chico is hoping to capitalize on its cult like status with the release of its new hard seltzer lineup.

The iconic Mexican brand (based out of Monterrey but now owned by Coca Cola Co.) has officially launched its debut line of hard seltzer drinks in several countries around the world.

It’s also worth noting because this marks the first time time in years that Coca Cola will be selling alcoholic beverages. The soda giant sold off its wine business in 1983, per the Wall Street Journal. This will be the first time in decades that the beverage giant sells alcohol in the U.S. — and what a fitting time to do so.

So far, the hard seltzer is available in Brazil and Mexico and will hit U.S. shelves in early 2021.

Rightfully so, Topo Chico is initially rolling out the product in Latin America with Mexico City, Puebla, Acapulco, Tijuana, Guadalajara and Monterrey getting the product in Mexico; while Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo will get it in Brazil.

As far as flavors, we’re looking forward to three gluten-free ones, including Tangy Lemon Lime, Strawberry Guava, and Pineapple Twist. The packaging is cool too: the hard seltzer ships in sleep aluminum cans.

And the new drinks are expected to live up to their namesake with a 4.7% alcohol by volume (which is higher than most beers) and just 100 calories per can.

A Coca Cola spokesperson said in a statement that “Topo Chico Hard Seltzer will appeal to drinkers who are looking for a refreshing, lighter alternative to other higher-calorie, higher-sugar alcoholic beverages. Most hard seltzer fans are migrating from beer, so this growth will be incremental to our business.”

Topo Chico only just recently expanded across the U.S. but it’s long been a favorite in Mexico.

Topo Chico has long been a popular water brand across Mexico and in a handful of U.S. states. It’s already carved out a niche market that has made it a cult favorite in places like Austin, TX. Popular for it’s “throwback image” and cool design, Topo Chico has seen massive growth, over the last year U.S. sales jumped 39 percent to nearly $130 million, according to data from IRI, a Chicago-based market research firm.

The secret behind Topo Chico is its mythical origins. The water is sourced from a limestone spring concealed under a mountain in northeastern Mexico. The drink was built on a legend of the thermal waters of the Cerro del Topo Chico, which is where the drink got its name. The story goes that the hidden spring water cured an Aztec princess’ illness. While there’s no way to verify the myth, Topo Chico indeed does come from the same underground spring since 1895.

And as the brand gains recognition across the U.S., it seems only natural that the company would start to add more products to its lineup. In fact, recently the company also released a “lemon-lime” version of its water that’s very much like a limonada.

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