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Colombian DJ Sinego on His Potent Mix of Latin EDM and Boleros in “Veneno”

Colombian DJ and producer Sinego is kicking off 2021 with his new single “Veneno.” The rising star is helping put Latin EDM on the map while forging his own path in that scene. As evidenced by the intoxicating “Veneno,” he uniquely blends house music with a bolero influence. In an exclusive interview, Sinego talked with Latido Music about working with hit songwriter Dani Blau, his musical philosophy, and how he will go the distance for his art.

Sinego serves EDM with emotion.

“The best music is the music that makes you feel nostalgic, but also makes you dance,” Sinego tells mitú. “I already had that sad part, that nostalgic part [with the bolero influence] and I needed electronic music from the future that makes you dance and actually move. I think my music is like the perfect marriage of the future and the past.”

That sadness is apparent in Sinego’s past hits with titles like “Duele,” “Verte Triste” and “Nada.” In December, he adapted Argentine singer Facundo Cabral’s “No Soy De Aquí” into a wistful yet sensual dance track with Robby East.

Sinego studied classical music at the Conservatorium of Music and there was a time when he was in a punk rock band. All of those elements, that complexity of classical music, that punk angst, and the touch of his electronic mystique, are present in his work now.

“In electronic music, you can morph what’s being said so much with synthesizers and everything that’s electronic, going really deep into every single sound,” he says. “You can actually convey greater messages.”

He’s worked with acts like Bomba Estéreo and Sofi Tukker.

Like the artists who inspire him, Sinego doesn’t want his music just be played. He wants his music to connect and do something for his listeners. Sinego was fortunate to collaborate with both of his dream bands for his remix of their song “Playa Grande.”

“I get inspired by people who are doing something interesting socially,” he says. “Bomba Estéreo, I love that they were able to go mainstream internationally with music that wasn’t mainstream. Sofi Tukker, they’re collaborating with people in Latin America and empowering them. I love those acts that empower Latin artists to go further.”

He helped highlight more Latin EDM acts with the “100 Producers Project.”

Last year, Sinego was also able to embody that pay-it-forward philosophy for other Latin EDM artists. He teamed up with Mexican DJs Broz Rodriguez and Alex Berserker for the “100 Latin Producers” project, where they put together a song made by 100 DJs from Latin America, the U.S., Spain, and Portugal.

“If it’s difficult for people to work with one producer and one singer, just think about having 100 of them,” Sinego says with a laugh. “It was very complex because we had to marry [the work of] 100 producers. I’m really happy about it because in the end a lot of people connected through that project. A lot of bookings happened, so a lot of artists were able to travel to other locations and do gigs and go into Spotify and go into playlists because of that project, so it actually grew the industry.”

His co-writer Dani Blau sings on “Veneno.”

With “Veneno,” Sinego is now showcasing his co-writer, Dani Blau. After starting out as an artist, the Costa Rican singer shifted into songwriting full-time for pop stars like Danna Paola, Sebastián Yatra, and TINI. Her smoky vocals that are usually on demos get to glide over Sinego’s haunting melody.

“As a producer, I think you get the purest form of art with the songwriter singing the actual track,” Sinego says. “The songwriter gave it the feeling. That’s the person who actually felt the track.” Blau adds, “It brings back the genuine, cool feeling of writing music and being able to put it out yourself so that people can hear it.”

The song is melancholic yet alluring. In Spanish and English, Blau sings about being in the throes of a toxic romance. She can’t shake this person that’s no good for her. Sinego admits that he was getting out of a bad relationship when he started producing “Veneno.”

“We always want to write something that has a dark feeling when we write together,” Blau says. “I let the beats and the instruments give me a feeling and we took it from there. The song is a vibe. It doesn’t really matter what language I’m speaking. It carries the vibe.”

That toxicity carried through to the artwork.

@Ricardoenc & @dardomx 

Sinego embraced that toxic vibe down to the single’s artwork. Next to his piercing green eyes are two bright blue Phyllobates Terribilis, the most poisonous frogs in the world. He borrowed the frogs from Dardo, a non-profit that protects amphibians around the world. The org will receive all the profits from the song.

“I was like, ‘Ok, the song’s talking about poison, so I shall get the most poisonous thing on my face, and if I die for the artwork, I die,'” Sinego laughs. Blau adds, “Sinego has to be like the most 360-degree creative being I have ever met. He takes it to a whole other level.”

As for what’s next, Sinego is extending his reach to Spain with an upcoming collaboration with Delaporte. “There’s more videos and music, but that are more politically and socially-connected,” he says. “It’s going to be saying a message against what’s happening in the world. More boleros coming from Mexico and Colombia. And more complex musical concepts.”

Read: 10 Rising Latin Music Stars to Watch For in 2021

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Exclusive: Maluma Talks Sun Collab “Rumba,” Working with The Weeknd, J.Lo And More

Latidomusic

Exclusive: Maluma Talks Sun Collab “Rumba,” Working with The Weeknd, J.Lo And More

CESAR PIMIENTA

Maluma is teaming up with the biggest star in the solar system for his new single “Rumba (Puro Oro Anthem).” As part of an Earth Day campaign with Michelob ULTRA Pure Gold, the Colombian superstar joined forces with the sun. He’s also coming on a decade in the music industry. In an exclusive interview with Latido Music, Maluma talked about the inspiration behind “Rumba” and the hottest collaborations of his career.

“Rumba” is part of Maluma’s campaign with Michelob.

“Collaborating with the sun was great,” Maluma tells mitú. “Maybe I’m the only artist in the world who has the opportunity. It’s a big thing for me. I enjoyed the process. I also enjoyed working with Michelob ULTRA Pure Gold. They love the same things that I love like helping the world. I feel grateful.”

Maluma recorded “Rumba (Puro Oro Anthem)” for Michelob to celebrate the beer brand’s ULTRA Pure Gold lager that’s brewed with 100 percent renewable electricity from the sun. The warm reggaeton track was recorded featuring sounds from the actual sun. Maluma wrote it with Keityn and Edgar Berrera, who also composed “Hawái” with him.

“These two guys are geniuses,” Maluma says. “When we work together we’re a dream team. When this campaign came to the table, I told them that I needed a big song. I recorded it in Turks and Caicos around three weeks ago. The song came out great. I love it.”

This year Maluma will be celebrating 10 years in the music industry.

This year, Maluma will be celebrating a decade in the industry since the release of his debut single “Farandulera.” After dropping his breakthrough album Pretty Boy, Dirty Boy in Oct. 2015, Maluma is one of the artists that helped globalize Latin music. He’s happy to be a part of the movement, but he also recognizes the stars that came before him.

“It’s not like we started this year or last year,” Maluma says. “This has been work that started with Ricky Martin’s ‘Livin’ La Vida Loca’ and Shakira like 15 or 20 years ago. I feel like I’m part of it. I feel proud of it. I feel like we still need to do more things, more big things.”

Next up, Maluma’s fans can see him on tour this fall.

As for what’s next, the “Rumba” music video will be released on Earth Day, April 22. Maluma is also hitting the road this fall for his Papi Juancho Tour in the U.S. The tour kicks off in September and runs through late October.

“Coming back to the stage is something that I really need,” Maluma says. “I miss being with my fans. I miss hugging them. I miss going on tour. I miss the whole lifestyle. I can’t wait to see you guys on tour and sing of course for the first time all my new songs that I released this year.”

Since Maluma is also celebrating 10 years in the industry, we had him break down some of the biggest collaborations in his career.

Jennifer Lopez

Maluma will make his big-screen debut in Marry Me with Jennifer Lopez in Feb. 2022. The movie was pushed back to that date due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The two singers also collaborated on songs for Marry Me like “Pa’ Ti” and “Lonely.”

“I always wanted to work on a big project,” Maluma says. “In a big movie. I had a couple of opportunities to work on other things, but I said ‘no’ because I was waiting for this big moment. Thanks to Jennifer Lopez and Owen Wilson and the whole team to make me part of the movie. I have a lot of beautiful moments. She’s great. She’s such a master for me. She taught me many things when we were working together. I would say from the beginning to the end, the whole experience was great.”

The Weeknd

Maluma teamed up with Canadian superstar The Weeknd for a Spanglish remix of “Hawái.” They pushed the song to No. 12 on the all-genre Billboard Hot 100 chart. Maluma helped The Weeknd with his Spanish in the remix.

“At the beginning, the first vocals he recorded, I had to tell him to change a little bit,” Maluma says. “The ‘Instagram’ part because he was saying it in the wrong way, like pretty bad Spanish. I sent him the vocals, like the way he had to say it, and then he changed it. He’s great. He’s super talented.”

Ziggy Marley

For his latest album 7 Días En Jamaica (#7DJ), Maluma teamed up with Jamaican star Ziggy Marley for the song “Tonika.” He performed the song for the first time with Bob Marley’s son at the Latin American Music Awards last week.

“That was great working with Ziggy,” Maluma says. “He’s one of my favorite artists too. I always wanted to work with him because I’m a huge fan of Bob Marley. It’s one of the best things I could’ve done in the album. He put the Marley DNA in my project and that was great.”

Shakira

Maluma and Colombian icon Shakira have teamed up on a number of collaborations, including the hit singles “Chantaje” and “Clandestino.” They also worked together on “Trap,” another cut from Shakira’s El Dorado album.

“I love working with Shakira, but I have to be honest, it’s not easy because she loves everything to be on-point,” Maluma says. “She’s super strict with everything that she does. I would love to work with her again. She’s a master for me too. She’s one of the first big stars that helped me and wanted to work with me. I’m forever grateful to her for giving me the chance to work with such a big artist.”

Click here for Latido Music, 24/7 Latin music videos & more

Read: Exclusive: Maluma Talks “Amor En Coma” with Manuel Turizo and Supporting Colombian Artists

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Mon Laferte Talks Regional Mexican Album ‘Seis’ and Singing With Gloria Trevi

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Mon Laferte Talks Regional Mexican Album ‘Seis’ and Singing With Gloria Trevi

MAYRA ORTIZ

Chilean singer-songwriter Mon Laferte is back with her new album Seis. Across the 14 tracks, she tackles various regional Mexican music genres while enlisting the support of local legends like Gloria Trevi and Alejandro Fernández. That alternative edge that Laferte is known for is still present. In an interview with Latido Music, she talked about her inspiration for the album and the stories behind a few of the songs.

Chavela Vargas was a big inspiration for the album.

Laferte is from Chile, but she’s lived most of her music career in Mexico, so these sounds are familiar sounds to her. Another famous Mexican transplant, Costa Rica-born Chavela Vargas, was a major inspiration for Seis.

“She was a very free woman,” Laferte tells mitú. “I admired her freedom and her gall. She didn’t care what anyone thought. She was who she was. She sang her songs with heart and soul. She left her life in every song.”

There’s even a banda moment on Seis.

Regional Mexican music is heard around the world, especially in Chile. Before moving to Mexico, the sound of the country was part of Laferte’s childhood. She dabbled in banda music for the first time in “Se Me Va A Quemar El Corazón” with Banda El Limón De René Camacho.

“This album is an homage to Mexico, so it had to have a bit of everything that the country is known for,” Laferte says. “It was very important for me to represent banda music on this album. The truth is banda has always been interesting to me.”

“La Mujer” with Gloria Trevi

In a highly-anticipated moment on the album, Laferte teamed up with Trevi for “La Mujer.” She reveals this was a heavily requested collaboration by both their fan bases. In the incredible music video, Laferte and Trevi dance together in front of a giant vagina. The girl power here is everything.

“Gloria is someone who I have always admired since my childhood,” Laferte says. “She’s always been an inspiration to me because she’s a powerful woman too. She’s like Chavela. She’s a woman that rose from the ashes. We were practicing the choreography for the music video and I had so much fun with her. She was just as I imagined she would be.”

During the interview, I blurt out that this was a big moment for their fans in the LGBTQ+ community. “It’s a big moment for me too!” Laferte says with a laugh. “[To my fans in the community] I send them big kisses, a lot of love, and give them my thanks for listening to my music and for all the support.”

“Esta Morra No Se Vende”

Another girl power moment on the album is “Esta Morra No Se Vende.” Laferte is living her best Norteña life in this song that speaks to overly-advertised consumerism. She even lets out a grito to boot.

“That was one of the last songs I wrote for the album,” Laferte says. “Now with what’s happening with social media, this is an ode to ostentation. That I have expensive things. That I have this. That I have that. I believe that’s the reality that me and many other women face. You’re not going to buy me with your money, or your likes, or your numbers of any kind.”

“Que Se Sepa Nuestro Amor” with Alejandro Fernández

“Que Se Sepa Nuestro Amor” was the first single from Laferte’s Seis album. With Mexican music royalty, Fernandéz, she has a mariachi music moment. Even though the artists haven’t been able to meet face-to-face, they came through with a dreamy duet.

“When we recorded the song, we were at the beginning of the [COVID-19] pandemic,” Laferte says. “When we were very closed-off and didn’t go out. It was all done from a distance. He was very nice and very professional, but we didn’t see each other. Till this day we haven’t seen each other in person but only through technological means. He’s very cool. Very sweet. He has a beautiful voice.”

“Aunque Te Mueras Por Volver”

One of the most striking songs on Seis is “Aunque Te Mueras Por Volver.” This is most similar to the alternative drama that Laferte has served before in her greatest hits. If there was ever a need for a James Bond theme song in Spanish, this would be the perfect fit.

“The song was inspired by cinema like James Bond and all that,” Laferte says. “It also has that spirit of the music from the time of Frank Sinatra, Raphael from Spain, and José José from Mexico. Like that orchestral era with beautiful voices. The lyrics are the story of my life.” With a smirk, she adds, “Aunque te mueras por volver, but you already lost your chance.”

Click here for Latido Music, 24/7 Latin music videos & more

Read: Dominican Duo Martox is Keeping Latin Alternative Music Alive with “Mente”

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