Music

Exclusive: Mexican-American Trio Tiarra Girls Release “Soy Chingona”, An Anthem of Sisterhood Empowerment

Sisters Tori Baltierra, Tiffany Baltierra and Sophia Baltierra, also known as Tiarra Girls, released their new single and music video for “Soy Chingona“, a bilingual anthem of sisterhood, inspired by the strong women in their community. Alternative rock, ska, and cumbia meet in “Soy Chingona”, which celebrates women’s reclamation of autonomy. Following the theme of female empowerment, Tiarra Girls deliberately utilized an all women identifying production crew from creative conception to execution to bring their accompanying visuals to life. 

Watch the music video here:

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We had the chance to ask Tiarra Girls about the inspiration behind “Soy Chingona”, writing bilingual songs and more below. In true sister spirit, the sister replied collectively to our questions for Latido Music by mitú.

What inspired you to write “Soy Chingona”? 

Tiarra Girls: “This song was created from the overwhelming necessity to reclaim our power as women who firmly believe in breaking the barriers of the patriarchy. Throughout the timeline of our lives, we can recount many experiences where women have opened paths for us, inspired us, and celebrated us. We call those women Chingonas. To pay respect to them and to celebrate our own evergrowing Chingona identity, we wrote this anthem.”

Tiarra Girls: “First of all, we LOVE “telepatía” and Kali Uchis! As artists that live within the hyphen of Mexican-American, we aimed to showcase our identities from both worlds. Growing up, we listened to artists from Selena to Vicente Fernandez to The Beatles to KISS. The pool of diverse music we were surrounded by subconsciously showed us that these cultures can coexist within us in a way that inspires us to make art. Celebrating and expressing our culture through rhythms, lyrics, and grooves has always been important to us as we’ve never known life without Música Latina.” 

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What can you share with us about your experience filming the music video for “Soy Chingona”? 

Tiarra Girls: “Filming the video for “Soy Chingona” was an experience that we’ve collectively agreed will go in all of our memoirs. We decided to have an all women crew because it felt authentic to our message and we prioritized the lenses, creativity, and skills of these women. There were moments on set where we would sit back and be in awe of the overall energy that we were creating. Written by women, made by women, for Chingonas.” 

Which women in the music industry or in entertainment do you look up to that you consider to be Chingonas?

Tiarra Girls: “When you grow up as a young Latina musician, you begin to realize that in order to find other Latinas to look up to, you have to seek them out and always keep your eyes peeled. The first musical Chingona that we ever got to know was the iconic Selena Quintanilla. Her music and essence inspires us almost daily ever since the moment our parents introduced us to her. We’ve received guidance and inspiration from Clamencia Zapata, Nina Diaz, Gina Chavez, Marisoul of La Santa Cecilia, and more. In the podcasting arena, we’ve been inspired by Eva and Pat Arreguin of Decolores Radio and Diosa and Mala of Locatora Radio. Our playlists are flooded with women we consider to be Chingonas like Kali Uchis, Jenni Rivera, Becky G, Ana Gabriel, Chavela Vargas, and the list goes on.”

Tiarra Girls recently announced their new co-management deal with Cosmica Artists and 484 management

Clearly, the future is bright for the award-winning Austin sister trio, and they’re taking the right steps along the way to reach a bigger audience. Congrats Chingonas! We can’t wait to see what’s next for you!

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