Entertainment

Cardi B Is, Once Again, Fed Up With Trolls Trying to Body Shame Her With Edited Photos

Cardi B, once again, took to Instagram to combat the neverending stream of trolls who are trying to tear her down.

Earlier this month, some unflattering photos of Cardi made the rounds on the internet, prompting people to publicly bully her for her looks. The unflattering photos showed her makeup-free, her hoodie up, appearing to be shopping at her local Target.

via PopCraveMusic/Twitter

Cardi was hone too pleased with the photos. In a now-deleted Instagram post, she shared a side-by-side photos of the viral picture next to the original one. The viral picture was noticeably photo-shopped to make her face look less attractive and her behind look more exaggerated.

In a lengthy Instagram caption, Cardi condemned the internet bullies, calling out people for sharing photoshopped pictures on their platforms for clicks and likes.

via PopCraveMusic/Twitter

“It’s the fact that people try to photoshop my face and body to post on their platform so people can bash me and make me feel down on my appearance on purpose….and the fact this a paparazzi picture from months ago,” she wrote.

She also added a note in her comments calling out the hypocriy of some of the female bullies who otherwise claim to be all about “supporting women” and “female empowerment”.

“And the sad sh– is,” she said. “That the people that be doing these rumors and be trying to make people bash me about my looks are WOMEN!”

Ironically enough, the shopping session that Cardi was papped at was allegedly dedicated to her buying $5,000 worth of gifts for children in need in the upcoming holiday season. The photos were from December 2019.

This isn’t the first time Cardi has publicly clapped back at body-shamers and online haters. In June, she was also the target of internet harassers who were criticizing her for gaining weight during quarantine.

At the time, Cardi posted a response video to Instagram joking that she “gained a little weight” but had “lipo money”, so the haters didn’t bother her. And in the past, it seems that haters never have bothered her.

via Getty Images

Cardi has always been transparent about her willingness to go under the knife in order to alter her appearance.

But she’s always expressed her frustration at the catch-22 that comes with plastic surgery. “I feel like women constantly body shame me. They wanna be like: your body’s mad fake. You got fake boobs, you got a fake ass,” she said in a 2017 interview with HOT 97.

“And it’s just like: if you love your body so much, then why are you mad that I have a fake body? Maybe I didn’t really like my body. Does it bother you that I didn’t like my prior body and I wanted to get it fixed? People is never happy.”

But as always, Cardi considers success the best form of revenge. She promised that the haters are going to be especially mad in the next months, seeing as she has a project in the works that will “make a sick soul nauseous”.

If her new project comes anything close to the success she’s had recently, we’re 100% here for it.

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Cardi B Says She’s Planning on Releasing a Line of Hair-Care Products For Afro-Latinas

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Cardi B Says She’s Planning on Releasing a Line of Hair-Care Products For Afro-Latinas

Photo via Getty Images

Looks like Cardi B is following in Rihanna’s footsteps and getting into the beauty game! According to a recent Instagram post, the Bronx-born rapper is going to be releasing a line of hair-care products for Afro-Latinas this year.

“This year I will be coming out with a hair[care] line that I been working on at home for my hair and my daughter’s,” Cardi announced on Instagram on Tuesday.

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A post shared by Cardi B (@iamcardib)

She explained that the decision to make hair-care products for Afro-Latinas was inspired by her realization that it’s “time for people to educate themselves on nationality, race and ethnicity.”

“Being Hispanic/Latina don’t make your hair long, don’t make your skin light, or don’t make your face features slim, [e]specially Latin countries from the Caribbean islands,” she explained further. “DNA [has] something to do with your hair, not your nationality.”

As many Latinos know, many non-Latinos are uneducated about the diversity of Latinidad. People expect all Latinos to look like Eva Longoria or Salma Hayek. But as we know, Latino is an ethnicity, not a race. Latinos come in all different shades, with vastly different features.

The comments on Cardi’s post were elated at the news that she would be releasing hair-care products for Afro-Latinas.

“Thank you!!! I’m Panamanian and they act like we don’t exist!” wrote one fan.

“Hair doesn’t have ethnicity. It has texture. It’s not black hair or white hair. It’s curly hair or straight hair. Kinky hairy or curly. 4a or 4c. People just generalize it and don’t understand,” wrote another.

On Twitter, another fan wrote: “Ok fav let’s talk about the hair care line you talking about so I can buy it and I won’t have to keep making the mask, forget everything else.”

Cardi’s decision to make hair-care products for Afro-Latinas came from (what else?) a Twitter argument.

When a Twitter user decided to challenge Cardi’s Blackness (again). The argument started when a Twitter user was claiming that Cardi’s hair pattern disqualifies her from being considered “Black.” So Cardi took it upon herself to educate her followers about the existence of Afro-Latinos. She also gave her followers a history lesson on the Dominican Republic.

The conversation got so frustrating that Cardi tweeted: “I think I’m going to do a video of different Hispanic people or Latin people or w.e. the correct term is nowadays. Cause people be thinking that every Hispanic is Mexican or something and must have the same hair texture, color, and features.”

Cardi B has always been passionate about hair-care. Last year, she shared a DIY hair mask recipe that she uses on her and Kulture’s rizos.

The hair mask consisted of argan oil, castor oil, olive oil, and mayonnaise. Since then, the at-home hair mask has gained a small but vocal fan club online.

If her hair mask recipe is a preview for things to come, we can’t wait to buy Cardi B’s hair-care products for Afro-Latinas.

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Latina Chef and TV Personality Alejandra Ramos Is Tired of Getting Racist, Sexist Body-Shaming Comments From Viewers

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Latina Chef and TV Personality Alejandra Ramos Is Tired of Getting Racist, Sexist Body-Shaming Comments From Viewers

Courtesy NBC News

As a woman on the planet, we’re often subject to unwanted comments about our bodies. Often, people cloak their comments in “concern”. We may be “giving people the wrong idea” or “distracting” others with the way our bodies look. And if you’re a woman of color, as TV chef Alejandra Ramos writes, this criticism is more intense.

As a woman of color, people often fetishize and other-ize our bodies. Clothing that might be appropriate and “normal” on a white body becomes downright dangerous on yours. This is especially true if you are more curvaceous.

On Tueday, chef and TODAY show contributor Alejandra Ramos wrote an emotional piece venting her frustration at the body-shaming comments viewers make about her body.

The comments Alejandra Ramos receives often have both sexual and racialized undertones. After a successful TODAY show segment where Ramos presented a fun recipe on sheet pancakes, her feelings of accomplishment were quickly dampened by negative feedback she got about the way her body looks on camera.

“I’m sure NBC execs were frowning during the segment,” someone tweeted at her. “Suggest you wear more appropriate attire next time you appear on a U.S. channel, especially when you appear on a premiere show like Today. I want to see more of your recipes on air with a little less of your figure.”

And this hateful comment was just one of many racist, body-shaming comments that Alejandra Ramos received from disgruntled viewers.

Ramos received a myriad of other racist, body-shaming criticisms about her appearance. “You are not working in Spanish television where women’s fashion is more revealing than American,” said another person. “Do we have to look at your body?” wrote someone else.

The issue, apparently, was the dress that Ramos was wearing: a flowing, citrus-orange A-line dress with a V-neck that revealed some of her décolletage.

These criticisms stand out because they have overt racist and sexist undertones. These critics highlighted the fact that Alejandra Ramos was other–a Latina in a white space.

“The real issue was that, as a vibrant, curvy, Latina woman, I was thriving and being celebrated in a space that rarely makes room for people who look like me,” wrote Ramos on a powerful op-ed for TODAY.

Ramos explained in her op-ed that people have made negative, racialized comments about her body not only throughout her career, but throughout her life.

“I was always darker, curvier, chubbier and frizzier than everyone else around me,” she explained. By the time she was 11-years-old, adults were making negative comments about her body, sexualizing her, telling her to “cover up”.

“Sometimes the comments do come from a good place, however misguided”, Ramos wrote, “but more often than not, they’re words of control and racism.”

“Styles, outfits and body shapes that are praised and celebrated on white bodies are judged differently on people of color.”

Ramos revealed that a white, thinner friend of hers wore an almost identical dress to hers in a different cooking segment and got none of the body-hate that Ramos did.

Luckily, instead of withering under the criticism, Ramos is using it as an opportunity to thrive. By showing up in her curvaceous, Latina body with pride, Ramos is showing other women and young girls of color that their bodies are normal and worthy.

“To the woman who wrote to me after my segment: I know that kids are watching — and I’m glad they are,” she concluded her op-ed. “I hope many of them are girls like I once was, and that seeing me on TV makes them realize that no matter what anyone says to them, they are good and valued and worthy of anything they dream of.”

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