Culture

Starbucks Changed Its Stance On Letting Baristas Wear BLM Apparel— These Black Coffee Shops Will Do You One Better

After receiving backlash from fans, Starbucks has had a change of heart on its position prohibiting employees from wearing apparel, such as T-shirts or pins, that support the “Black Lives Matter” movement. In a press release posted to employees, earlier this week the coffee giant revealed that it would not allow baristas to promote the moment. This is despite the fact that it has publicly supported “Black Lives Matter” on its social media channels.

In a new statement released on Friday, Starbucks said they felt it was “critical to support the ‘Black Lives Matter’ movement as its founders intended and will continue to work closely with community leaders, civil rights leaders, organizations, and our partners to understand the role that Starbucks can play, and to show up in a positive way for our communities.”

For many, us here at mitú included, Starbuck’s decision to allow its employees to promote the BLM movement by wearing paraphernalia associated with it is just a little too late. And certainly not enough.

If you’re looking to promote the BLM movement, we encourage you to do so by buying Black. The next time you crave some coffee forget Starbucks! Shoppe Black is a website that curates Black-owned places to buy from and they recently shared Black coffee shops to buy from.

Check some of them out below.

South LA Cafe 

(Los Angeles, CA) Get your coffee, tea, and healthy and affordable food options all here in this South LA spot.

Cuples Tea House

(Baltimore, MD) This family-owned business also produces tea that offers loose leaf teas, tea accessories, and tons of culture.

Kaffeine Coffee Internet & Office Cafe

(Houston, TX) Kaffeine Coffee is supposed to be a funky cafe that provides coffee, sandwiches, and baked goods.

Not So Urban Coffee & Roastery 

(Oxford, GA) According to Shop Black, Not So Urban is a small batch micro roaster specializing serving coffee sourced from Africa, South/Central America, and Asia.

Golden Thyme Coffee & Cafe 

(St Paul, MN) This coffee shop provides a setting with jazz music cakes and treats.

More Than Java Cafe’ 

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(Laurel, MD) According to reviews, More Than Java is a vibrant spot featuring classic cafe dishes and ice cream.

Amalgam Comics & Coffeehouse

(Philadelphia, PA) It’s not just a coffee store! Amalgam is also a comic book store that offers offers everything from comics, toys, games, and figurines. As well as baked goods!

Whippd Cosmetics Is Launching Nude Glosses for Black Women

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Whippd Cosmetics Is Launching Nude Glosses for Black Women

Remember the terrible days when “nude” shoes were on-trend and Black women everywhere were forced to take part in something that was meant for white women? Welp, the nude lip trend has done quite a bit of not so great favors for women of color as well. Fortunately, the black-owned beauty shop Whippd Cosmetics is blessing Black women with nude glosses that work for all of our skin tones.

On June 27, Rachel Robins the entrepreneur behind the Whippd brand announced that she’d be launching a line of nude glosses for Black women.

“I created 6 nude lip glosses made with black women in mind and I just want them to go viral! Twitter do your thing,” Robins wrote in a tweet that featured a video displaying the line with meltaonin-rich shades.

Soon enough, Twitter did do its thing and her post wrangled in over 50,000 likes and 26,000 retweets. Speaking to Teen Vogue Robins says she was “extremely shocked but also humbled” by the support she received from Twitter. “So many people messaged me about how the collection made them feel seen. It warmed my heart and was the extra boost I needed to keep going.”

Whippd Cosmetics’ first launch, called the Coco Collection, will include six different nude shades.

The glosses are rich with pigments that cater to Black women who are so often overlooked by beauty brands that still use words like “nude” to cover only a portion of the beauty market. After all, what big brands call “nude” typically works for white women only.

Speaking about her own personal experiences, Robins says she wanted to create nude lip glosses that cater specifically for Black women.

“My experience of trying to find the perfect nude lip color to match me was always unsuccessful,” Robins explained. “The colors I would use would either be too light, too dark or have a blaring red undertone. I would often have to mix together my own shades and I knew other black women have encountered the same issue while shopping for the perfect nude lip.”

The gloss shades launched on July 1st and are available on WhippdCosmetics.com.

The Coco Collection promises to “compliment your complexion” with colors that as sweet-sounding as their names are. From latte, amaretto, butterscotch to brown sugar, ebony, and truffle these shades will sweeten your heart. While the entire collection costs $48, each gloss goes for $10.

If Whippd’s new gloss line isn’t exciting enough, you’ll likely fall in love with their line of body butters and scrubs which are infused with essential oils.

There’s Still More To Do But Black Lives Matter Protests Have Resulted In These Major Police Reforms

Things That Matter

There’s Still More To Do But Black Lives Matter Protests Have Resulted In These Major Police Reforms

Spencer Platt / Getty Images

In the wake of the murder of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers, the country has struggled with how to best respond to police brutality and racial inequality. Millions of Americans (and millions more around the world) have poured into the streets demanding justice and police accountability.

Although more Black Americans have been killed by police since the death of George Floyd – and long before him – police reform is finally starting to take shape. Several communities across the United States are discussing ways to defund and restructure their police forces and their entire approach to supporting and protecting communities.

Although several victories have already been won, there is still so much work to do to ensure that #BlackLivesMatter.

Minneapolis will defund and dismantle their police force.

The Minneapolis City Council on Friday unanimously approved a proposal to change the city charter to allow the Police Department to be dismantled – this is the first step in removing the police force.

The 12-0 vote is just the first step in a process that still faces significant obstacles to make the November ballot, where the city’s voters would have the final say. Activists have long accused the department of being unable to change a racist and brutal culture, and earlier this month, a majority of the council proclaimed support for dismantling the department.

Draft language of the amendment posted online would replace the department with a Department of Community Safety and Violence Prevention, “which will have responsibility for public safety services prioritizing a holistic, public health-oriented approach

Cities such as New York and Los Angeles are defunding their police departments.

Credit: Emily Uite/ Getty Images

Aside from completely dismantling the police, several major cities have committed to defunding their police departments. “Defund the police” has become a common protest chant, as protesters want to see the billions of dollars spent on police equipment and enforcement to instead be spent on investing in communities.

Several jurisdictions have implemented total bans on the police use of choke holds – like the one that killed Eric Gardner.

The NYPD has long banned the use of chokeholds, however, their ban is so often ignored by officers that viral videos of NYPD cops using the deadly maneuver are common. But the New York City Council has just adopted an ordinance that officially makes police use of a chokehold a misdemeanor offense.

The legal ban has already been put into action as an NYPD officer was caught on video using one against a suspect. That officer has already been fired and charged.

Although several police departments have long banned the chokehold – for example, the LAPD banned them 40 years ago – cities are now starting to actually attempt to enforce the ban with legal consequences.

For the first time in decades, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a police reform bill.

Democrats and Republicans are deadlocked over how to address racial inequities in policing, despite strong public sentiment for effective reform after Floyd died in Minneapolis as a white policeman knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes.

In June, the House passed sweeping legislation to address racial inequality in policing but the bill is all but dead on arrival in the Senate, and has a formal veto threat from Trump.

The bill addresses chokeholds, no-knock warrants, police body cameras, use of deadly force, and training to de-escalate confrontations with suspects and to encourage officer intervention against illegal conduct as it occurs.

And one thing is clear – these reforms have the support of most Americans.

Credit: Spencer Platt / Getty Images

Most Americans believe that change must be made to law enforcement across the nation and that reforms are needed to reduce police brutality against Black Americans.

The poll, which was conducto de by Ipsos on behalf of Public Agenda and USA TODAY, found that about three in four people surveyed say racial bias against Black Americans is a serious problem in the U.S.

The poll found several reforms that focused around training and diversity in policing had support from three-quarters or more of respondents: requiring all officers to undergo training on de-escalation tactics to avoid the use of force, requiring all officers to undergo training on how to be less racially biased and recruiting more Black Americans to become police officers.

Even more popular: transparency reforms. Nine in 10 respondents supported having officers wear body cameras, 8 in 10 supported requiring police departments to publicly report all incidents involving the use of force within 72 hours, and nearly as many supported creating a national public database of officers who have used excessive force – and prohibiting other jurisdictions from rehiring them.