Culture

Fall May Be Coming, But mitúShop’s Newest Collection Is Sure To Keep You ‘Cozy!’

I don’t know about you, but in my humble opinion that means the best days are almost here. You know, the rainy ones when you stay tucked away under a heavy cobija San Marcos all day and, if you’re lucky, you can hear the rain falling outside as you enjoy some sort of sopa or caldo, recalentado. Mmmmmmm. To have a proper lazy day, you need the proper outfit; like some joggers and a beanie in case you need to run out for a snack, or a sweatshirt that tells the world how you really feel. mitúShop’s newest collection is here and it’s everything you need for your fall look. Que cozy!

Poderosas can have lazy days too.

 In fact, they deserve them the most! We see you, jefas, putting in all that work day in and day out. This weather is a sign that you needed to kick back and enjoy chill. But first, start your day off with some té or cafecito in your new favorite mug, you’ve earned it Poderosa. 😉

Click here to shop the new Poderosa mug!

Your Fall 2020 sweater staple

Who doesn’t love a good burgundy sweater? The Que Cozy sweater comes in the perfect fall colors and it’s warm enough to keep you toasty. Que más quieres?

“Que Cozy” sweater is also available in dark heather grey. Shop here.

Maná was onto something when they said “Me Vale!”

Like we were saying, if you end up having to leave the house it’s most likely for a snack emergency. Who has time to do their hair in a situation like that? Cover your lazy day hair and simultaneously let people know you don’t really care because they shouldn’t be judging you anyway. Shame on them!

“Me Vale” beanie is also available in white, click this link to shop!

When the unexpected happens, remember to keep your cool…

No pos wow! How could you forget the snacks to begin with? At least these joggers will keep you comfy no matter what surprise trips you have to go on. But let’s hope not too many, there’s a cobija waiting for you at home.

Joggers also come in heather gray. Check them out here!

Don’t forget your reusable bag!

The only reusable bag you need for your weekend trips to get the mandado. Get this for yourself or your favorite swap meeter, because who doesn’t love taking their time through the swap meet and coming up on great deals?

Shop the new Swap Meet Tote here!

What’s better than caldo on a rainy day?

If anyone asks what you’re having for dinner, point to the window and tell them the 3 words anyone will understand: “It’s Caldo Season.” Whether it’s sopa de res or gallina, pozole, menudo, or something even better, there’s nothing like a steaming bowl of hot sopa on a rainy day. Provecho!

Check out our new “Caldo Season” tee!

Well, we’ve got everything we need for a lazy day! Now if only we could get some rain…

P.S. – This is only a taste of the entire collection, there’s plenty of other designs and products you have to check out!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Mexico Plunges 23 Places On The World Happiness Report As The Country Struggles To Bounce Back

Things That Matter

Mexico Plunges 23 Places On The World Happiness Report As The Country Struggles To Bounce Back

Hector Vivas/Getty Images

When it comes to international happiness rankings, Mexico has long done well in many measurements. In fact, in 2019, Mexico placed number 23 beating out every other Latin American country except for Costa Rica. But in 2020, things looks a lot different as the country slipped 23 spots on the list. What does this mean for Mexico and its residents? 

Mexico slips 23 spots on the World Happiness Report thanks to a variety of compelling factors.

Mexico plummeted 23 places to the 46th happiest nation in the world, according to the 2020 happiness rankings in the latest edition of the United Nations’ World Happiness Report. The coronavirus pandemic had a significant impact on Mexicans’ happiness in 2020, the new report indicates.

“Covid-19 has shaken, taken, and reshaped lives everywhere,” the report noted, and that is especially true in Mexico, where almost 200,000 people have lost their lives to the disease and millions lost their jobs last year as the economy recorded its worst downturn since the Great Depression.

Based on results of the Gallup World Poll as well as an analysis of data related to the happiness impacts of Covid-19, Mexico’s score on the World Happiness Report index was 5.96, an 8% slump compared to its average score between 2017 and 2019 when its average ranking was 23rd.

The only nations that dropped more than Mexico – the worst country to be in during the pandemic, according to an analysis by the Bloomberg news agency – were El Salvador, the Philippines and Benin.

Mexico has struggled especially hard against the Coronavirus pandemic. 

Since the pandemic started, Mexico has fared far worse than many other countries across Latin America. Today, there are reports that Mexico has been undercounting and underreporting both the number of confirmed cases and the number of deaths. Given this reality, the country is 2nd worst in the world when it comes to number of suspected deaths, with more than 200,000 people dead. 

Could the happiness level have an impact on this year’s elections?

Given that Mexico’s decline in the rankings appears related to the severity of the coronavirus pandemic here, one might assume that the popularity of the federal government – which has been widely condemned for its management of the crisis from both a health and economic perspective – would take a hit.

But a poll published earlier this month found that 55.9% of respondents approved of President López Obrador’s management of the pandemic and 44% indicated that they would vote for the ruling Morena party if the election for federal deputies were held the day they were polled.

Support for Morena, which apparently got a shot in the arm from the national vaccination program even as it proceeded slowly, was more than four times higher than that for the two main opposition parties, the PAN and the PRI.

Still, Mexico’s slide in the happiness rankings could give López Obrador – who has claimed that ordinary Mexicans are happier with him in office – pause for thought.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

These Were The Moments That Defined Latin America In 2020 That Weren’t About COVID-19

Things That Matter

These Were The Moments That Defined Latin America In 2020 That Weren’t About COVID-19

PEDRO PARDO/AFP via Getty Images

2020 will easily go down in manny of our memories as the year that just wouldn’t stop. As the year started, it all seemed to be sort of fine as the world came together to battle record-breaking Australian bushfires and worked to hopefully contain an outbreak of a strange new virus in China.

However, as the year comes to a close things have gone de mal a peor for the world in general, but for the Latino population in the United States and Latin America as a region in particular. Though it’s hard to realize just how much we all witnessed and experienced since so much of what happened seems like it was a lifetime ago.

Here’s a look back at some the defining moments from 2020 across Latin America.

Jennifer Lopez and Shakira kicked off the year hopeful with a history-making performance at the Super Bowl.

Yes, believe it or not, this happened in 2020. The pair put on what many have called the best half time show in Super Bowl history. They were also joined by J Balvin and Bad Bunny.

Bolivia’s Evo Morales was forced into exile, only to return to the country in November.

After being forced into exile at the end of 2019 for attempting to illegally run in upcoming presidential elections, Morales spent a year abroad – first in Mexico and then in Argentina.

Mexico’s President AMLO made his first trip abroad to visit Donald Trump at the White House.

Mexico’s President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador is a staunch populist and has long said his primary focus is domestic policy within Mexico. Therefore, despite two years in office, AMLO hadn’t left Mexico once. So it came as a surprise when his first trip abroad was a visit to the U.S. leader who had long disparaged Mexico, the government, and Mexicans – not to mention his trip came in the middle of a global pandemic.

Migrant caravans continued to make their way towards the U.S. despite interference from Mexico and Covid-19.

Migrants attempting to make their way to the U.S. isn’t unique to 2020. For decades, migrants have long banded together for safety in numbers along the treacherous journey to the north. However, they became larger and better organized in 2020, perhaps owing to the new dangers of Mexican interference.

Mexico’s AMLO vowed to stop migrants from reaching the U.S.-Mexico border, adhering to Trump’s request. It was also noteworthy because the caravans continued despite the Covid-19 crisis, which has hit the region particularly hard.

Peru saw three presidents in the span of a few weeks after massive protests.

Peru is facing one of the greatest crises the nation has faced. Just as the country seemed to be emerging from the worst of its battle against the Covid-19 pandemic, the country has entered a severe political crisis.

The country’s elected president, Martin Vizcarra, was impeached and removed from office. His predecessor responded with a heavy hand to the protests that ensued resulting in his resignation less than 24 hours later. The government then had to find someone willing to take the job which proved to be a tough sell.

In fact, massive protests swept across Latin America.

From Mexico in the north to Cuba in the Caribbean and Chile in the south, protests were seen all across the region. Although each movement had it’s own stated goal and objectives, many were largely borne out of the same purpose: to fight back against corruption.

Brazil’s President Jaír Bolsonaro tested positive for Covid-19 but it did nothing to change his approach to the pandemic.

Jaír Bolsonaro has long been compared to Donald Trump, with many calling him the Donald Trump of South America. The two were also strongly aligned in their responses to the Coronavirus pandemic, with the pair largely downplaying the severity of the crisis.

Then, Bolsonaro became infected with the virus and many hoped it would change his view on the crisis. It didn’t.

A growing feminist movement developed in Mexico, demanding protection from a shocking rise in violence against women.

Mexico has long been battling endemic violence and the country has continued to see record-setting rates of homicides. But it was the growing rate of violence against women, particularly femicide, that gained national attention.

Women banded together and started large nationwide protests. Over the summer, women in the capital of Mexico City occupied government buildings and destroyed many of the city’s most popular monuments to hopefully get their message across. Although the movement has gained more recognition by Mexicans, the government has still failed to address their concerns. Let’s hope things are different in 2021.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com