Culture

Collective Excuse My Accent Is Sharing Cultural Stories Of Inclusivity And Embracing The Beauty Of Accents

Although they’re always so self-conscious of it, I love listening to my parents speak English. Their heavy accent, present in every syllable, tells a story of sacrifice, bravery, determination, and love. Along with a new way of life away from all their families and friends, they also had to learn an entire new language. My immigrant parents left their families behind in search for better opportunities, not just for themselves but for future generations as well, and their accent is like a scar that reminds them of the sacrifices and years of hard work to get them to where they are. To get us to where we are. 

The beautiful part of all of this is that I am not alone in this experience, as there are so many other members of my community that have gone through the same thing. In each other, we find strength, love, and family, and when we speak we don’t worry about being judged by others for having an accent or for being from where we’re from. It fills me with so much hope to know that these sentiments are not confined to our gente, but to everyone’s gente from all around the world, and so we are all connected accents and all. 

To honor our differences, mitú has partnered up with Cinq Music for a new collection that is all about owning our accents and connecting with others from all over the world who are doing the same.

What began as a conversation between two musicians who bonded over a mutual love of writing and performing music has turned into something much bigger, and so much more special. Drei Ros was worried about how his Romanian accent would be perceived when RobYoung explained that his accent is actually what made him unique, and made him feel connected to others who felt the same. Thus marked the beginning of “Excuse My Accent — a global media platform designed to share cultural stories of inclusivity, spotlight incredible individuals from diverse backgrounds, and feature organizations that are helping multicultural communities.”

Excuse My Accent is a collective committed to telling stories of empowerment and perseverance to humanize the multicultural experiences of so many around the world. The collective is made up of entrepreneurs, musicians, artists, and advocates who believe that sharing our human experiences and celebrating our unique cultural differences empowers us all. It has long been time to change the narrative around accents and celebrate our identities. 

As part of the mitú and Cinq partnership with Excuse My Accent, we are featuring the collection in our mitúShop and the items are perfect for anyone who wants to join in the conversation and make a statement.

Excuse My Accent — Hat

Excuse My Accent

Let others know that there’s more than meets the eye with your own Excuse My Accent hat! The next question you’ll probably be asked is where your accent is from and just like that, you’ve made a connection with someone 😉

Click here to shop!

Excuse My Accent — graphic tank

Excuse My Accent

If you don’t like hats and are already bummed about all the connections you’d be missing out on, no worries! The same design is also available in a tank, they got you covered. 

Click here to shop!

Excuse My Accent — Worldwide graphic tee

Excuse My Accent

Quick! Someone tell us Pitbull’s size because this has Mr. Worldwide written all over it. Literally. I mean check out the design with a map of the world, how much more worldwide can you be? 

Click here to shop!

Excuse My Accent — Inclusivity joggers

Excuse My Accent

Speaking of connectedness, let’s hear it for inclusivity! These inclusivity joggers are the definition of comfort, and the bands around the ankles means you can wear this out and about and not get dirty looks from señoras at the supermercado because they can’t believe you walked out of the house con esas garras. Señora, es fashion!

Click here to shop!

Excuse My Accent — Inclusivity tee

Excuse My Accent

And if you would rather say it with your chest (pun intended), the Inclusivity design is available in a crop top!

Click here to shop!

Excuse My Accent — Diversity tee

Excuse My Accent

Doves have long been a symbol of unity and peace. This design carries with it a reminder that no matter what walk of life you come from, we are all connected.

Click here to shop!

Excuse My Accent — graphic tee

Excuse My Accent

Wherever your accent is from, we hope you embrace it. Just as RobYoung said, it makes you unique. It’s a part of who you are.

Check out the entire new collection here!

Watch below to learn more about Excuse My Accent and its efforts:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=voNsErt7JY0&feature=youtu.be

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

From Swimwear To Summer Tanks, These Are The Brands Owned By Women Of Color To Buy For Your July Look

Fierce

From Swimwear To Summer Tanks, These Are The Brands Owned By Women Of Color To Buy For Your July Look

Twitter / Glamlindo Artesania

Birthdays are always an excuse to blow a little money and do some shopping. In our capitalist-based society, America’s birthday is no exception. However, if we’re going to dip into our bank accounts we can at least make sure to support Latinx and Black-owned businesses.

We’ve compiled a list of July buys you should shop to support these POC and Black entrepreneurship.

Let the shopping spree commence!

1. Chigona

Instagram / @soychigona

Established in 2013, Chigona is owned and operated by boss Latina entrepreneur, Julia Carrillo. Whether you need bags, jewelry, notebooks or sunglasses, this shop’s apparel is designed for chingonas of all walks of life. Chigona is celebrating America’s birthday and its owner’s birthday at the same time with a double discount of 20%. This will be applied automatically to your total purchase.

2. AC Cosmetics

Instagram / @accosmetics_

AC Cosmetics is a Black-owned beauty, cosmetics, and personal care business. It specializes in translucent powder but the company also sells lashes and hair care products. For the 4th of July, all cosmetics are 40% off with the promo code “FIREWORKS.”

3. Maldición

Instagram / @maldicionbrand

Focusing on the Xicanx and Mexican communities, Maldición explores the spaces where our Mexican and American identities meet. An apparel company that caters to both men and women Maldición’s colorful graphics make for substantially beautiful clothing. Starting today, the clothing brand will offer 15% total purchases through the 4th of July weekend. Just use promo code “CorazonDeLaGente” to redeem the deal.

4. Hey Mijita

Instagram / @heymijita

San Antonio-based Hey Mijita is a clothing and accessories shop with las mujeres in mind. A lifestyle brand that promotes Latina entrepreneurship, empowerment and self-worth, you’ll especially love Hey Mijitas fun tees and flirty skirts. On Thursday the 4th and Friday the 5th, the entire store will be 15% off.

5. Miradela

Instagram / @miradela

One part podcast and one part apparel shop, Miradela is a hip Houston-based, Latina owned brand. As if that wasn’t “fetch” enough, it’s also home of the “You’re Like Really Bonita” shirt. For America’s birthday, Miradela will have a 24-hour sale on all apparel. Use code “Sparkler” at checkout for your discount.

6. Cha Cha Covers

Instagram / @chachacovers

If you need your nails to be as on point as the rest of you, check out Cha Cha Covers’ 4th of July sale. Created by the crafty Ana Guajardo, these decals are both kind to your skin and really mesmerizing. For 25% off your purchase, use code “Stranger” from July 3rd through the 5th.

7. Glamlindo Artesania

Instagram / @glamlindo_artesania

Mixing artesania with modern fashion, Glamlindo Artesania embraces Mexico’s Indigenous communities. Founded by a Latina mother-daughter duo, Glamlindo partners with artisans to create unique items. On the 4th of July, the brand will offer 15% off your total purchase on their website.

8. Frida Inspired Shop

Instagram / @frida_inspired

Frida Kahlo is one of the most beloved Latina artists to ever live. Honoring the artist, the Frida Inspired Shop is filled with all things Kahlo. To get your hands on discounted artista jewelry or accessories, visit the Frida Inspired Shop on July 4th for 20% off your total purchase.

9. Mija Culture

Instagram / @mijaculture

The Texas-based Mija Culture is all about Emo Chola energy mixed with street wear. The Latina-owed shop offers hats, tees and accessories for both mijas AND mijos. Swing by their online shop on July 4th to get a 20% discount on your total purchase with promo code “Cuetes.”

10. Alni Body Care

Instagram / @alnicbd

CBD is beginning to find it’s way into more of our health and beauty products. It’s soothing power is awesome for aches and pains. That’s why Alni Body Care uses it in their homemade salves and oils. Through out the month of July, you can get free shipping on your order of CBD-infused body care items. Just use code “JulyFreeShip” at checkout.

11. Valfré

Instagram / @valfre

If you’re looking to add some hip new pieces to your summer wardrobe, Valfré is for you. Mexican artist Ilse Valfré founded the clothing, home goods, accessories and makeup brand. As such, you’ll find her creative cuties slapped on to most of her goods. From now until 11 PM on July 4th, you can get an additional 30% off of already on-sale items. CV

12. Viva La Bonita

@vivalabonita/Instagram

Viva La Bonita, the Latina lifestyle and apparel brand that is “inspired by the women who are fearless” has a delightful collection of one-piece swimsuits in any color that suits your fancy. Sizes run from XS to XXXL. Shop for your Bonita-wear here.

13. Night In Gail

Instagram / @nightingailcollection

Night In Gail wants you to take your self care to a whole new level. The California-based bath and body company was founded by a Black woman and uses CBD in their products for women, men and pets. Until July 8th, Night In Gail is offering 20% off of all orders. Use code “Summer” at check out.

14. Eye Candy Boutique

Instagram / @heyeyecandy

If you’re plus-sized, it can be especially hard to find awesome clothes that actually fit. Eye Candy Boutique have made it their mission to help ease this burden with their gorgeous clothing and shoes offerings. The Latina-owned boutique offers a live shop in San Antonio, Texas as well as an online store. Both will be open and offering a BOGO half-off promo until July 8th. Just apply code “BOGOFreedom” at check out.

15. Bruja Shop

Instagram / @OnceUponABruja

Something wicked this way comes. If you’re a little witchy and are looking for the perfect accessories to show it, check out the Bruja Shop. Specializing in Bruja-inspired jewelry, you can find rings, necklaces and other shiny things. The Bruja Shop will be offering 20% off your total July 4th order.

16. Vive Cosmetics

Instagram / @vivecosmetics

The fireworks won’t be the only things dazzling on July 4th. Latina-owned Vive Cosmetics wants to help you find the perfect shade from their cruelty-free and vegan product line. On July 4th and 5th, use code “HereToStay” for 20% off. Also. To celebrate the contribution of Latinx Immigrants, Vive Cosmetics will be donating an additional 20% from each sale to nonprofits helping with the border crisis.

17. Hija de tu Madre

Instagram / @hijadetumadre

If we’re going to acknowledge everything that makes the US great, we need to point out its atrocities as well. Lifestyle brand Hija De Tu Madre is doing just that with their new shirt. Dropping on July 4th at 8 am, their “Fuck Ice” shirt will be available for purchase. There’s no discount here but a portion of proceeds from this tee will go to Border Kindness.

18. Cholas x Chulas

Instagram / @cholaxchulas

Get your face glamorous just in time for the neighborhood 4th of July party with discounted goodies from Cholas x Chulas. The Latinx makeup brand features to-die-for eyeliner kits and fashion accents gems. Cholas x Chulas is going big for their 4th of July sale with 50% off of your total purchase. Use code “CXC50” at checkout to redeem.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Etsy Artist Sues Frida Kahlo Corporation After They Claim Trademark Infringement

Things That Matter

Etsy Artist Sues Frida Kahlo Corporation After They Claim Trademark Infringement

Artisan Nina Shope from Denver, Colo. is suing the Frida Kahlo Corporation (FKC) after her handmade Frida Kahlo dolls were flagged for deactivation. Last week, FKC lodged a trademark infringement claim with the popular e-commerce site Etsy.

Shope is demanding that the corporation ask Etsy to rescind its trademark infringement notice. The lawsuit also names a Panamanian organization related to the corporation, Frida Kahlo Investments, S.A. FKC is registered in Panama and has an office in Florida.

“I don’t believe that artists should be bullied or threatened into abandoning their art, silencing their voices, and stifling their creativity. That is the main reason why I am challenging the FKC’s alleged trademark registration, that has been used as a cudgel not only against me, but against a number of other creators and artists,” Shope wrote in a post on Facebook.

The complaint asserts that the FKC “submitted a false trademark takedown to Etsy claiming that Ms. Shope’s non-infringing use was in fact infringing.”

Shope isn’t the only Etsy artist selling Kahlo-inspired items on the site, a search of “Frida Kahlo” brings up more than 19k results while a search for #fridadoll on Instagram has more than 5K results featuring various artistic renderings.

The rights to Kahlo’s image expired in 2004, 50 years after the beloved Mexican artist and feminist icon died, and Isolda Pinedo Kahlo, the artist’s niece, placed a trademark on the name “Frida Kahlo,” and assigned that trademark to the FKC.

In 2018 the Kahlo family won a temporary injunction against toy manufacturer Mattel, forcing it to cease sales of its doll resembling the artist in Mexico as part of their “Inspiring Women” line.  

“I would have liked her to have a unibrow, for her clothes to be made by Mexican artisans. We, the Kahlo family, are the ones who have the rights to all these things,” Mara Cristina Romeo Pinedo, Frida Kahlo’s great-niece and Isolda’s daughter, told the AFP.

The mother and daughter disputed FKC’s rights to the artist’s name and image, demanding a redesign of the Barbie.

Consequently, FKC filed a lawsuit against Romeo Pinedo, alleging that she — who remains a shareholder and director at FKC — became dissatisfied with the group in 2011 and began a campaign to discredit the corporation and take over its role as the licensing agent for commercial products featuring the artist’s name and likeness.

“The Frida Kahlo Corporation actively participated in the process of designing the doll, Mattel has its permission and a legal contract that grants it the rights to make a doll of the great Frida Kahlo,” the company’s statement said.

Unlike Mattel, Shope and the other Etsy shops selling merchandise with her likeness are operating on a creative basis rather than overtly selling items directly connected to Frida or her work.

Shope’s complaint states, “The name of a doll does not violate the Lanham Act [the federal statute for trademarks, service marks, and unfair competition] unless the name has no artistic relevance to the underlying work whatsoever, or, if it has some artistic relevance, unless the title explicitly misleads as to the source or the content of the work. Here, neither concern applies.”

“We believe the doll represents a historical figure—you have to be able to say who that historical figure is without violating trademark. This is a brand new problem in the world of law and the world of art.” After having work removed from Etsy “the only way to get it back up is to sue the rights owner,”  Rachael Lamkin, Shope’s attorney, told ARTnews.

In a statement to ARTnews, a Frida Kahlo Corporation representative said, “We have made a significant investment in protecting the Frida Kahlo legacy, brand, and trademarks. We are prepared to vigorously defend our intellectual property and trademarks whenever our rights have been violated, and to stop any confusion that may be created in the market by such infringing activity.”

As of the time of publishing this post the handmade dolls are still available for purchase starting at $68 and featuring Frida’s signature unibrow.

Shope, who goes by SnapdragonOriginals on Etsy, launched a website detailing the reasons for the lawsuit, which she calls a “scary but exciting path.”

“I never imagined I would end up in litigation, especially against such a powerful corporation. However, I believe in supporting the rights of artists (especially those of us who are small artisans and craftspeople) to create beautiful and meaningful works of art that honor the legacy of Frida Kahlo. Although my Frida art dolls and hoops are not the totality of my collection (I have many folk-art inspired creations that I will later include on this website), they are a core element of what I create,” she wrote. “I will let you know how the lawsuit progresses, and hopefully the results will free more artists to share their visions with all of us.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com