Things That Matter

Latino Politicians And Celebrities Mourn The Death Of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

The United States lost an icon in the fight for equality. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Sept. 18 devastating activists and admirers across the country. Here are some of the tributes to the late justice seeker on social media.

The Supreme Court lost a tireless champion of equality.

Justice Ginsburg spent her legal career fighting for gender equality for women. In the 1970s, Justice Ginsburg began her fight to protect women and to advance the rights of women. Her time spent as an associate justice of the Supreme Court was filled with important decisions that shaped American society. She penned some of the most scathing dissents when rights were infringed upon. Her voice and her presence on the Supreme Court will be missed by Americans who admired the pop culture icon.

Latinos have been honoring Justice Ginsburg after her death due to pancreatic cancer.

Justice Ginsburg was a staunch ally of promoting and advancing civil liberties and rights to all communities in the U.S. The late justice left dying words about her hopes for her replacement.

“My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed,” Justice Ginsburg said, according to NPR.

People are calling for others to take action to honor the legacy and life of Justice Ginsburg.

“One of Justice Ginsburg’s greatest legacies was that she understood and greatly respected the spirit of the law as much as the letter of the law,” League of United Latin American Citizens President Domingo Garcia said in a statement. “She was well aware of her place in history as one of the voices for the excluded, the oppressed, and those trying to find real justice in our courts.”

Justice Ginsburg was the crucial vote in blocking the Trump administration from adding the citizenship question to the census. The Trump administration was hoping at add a question about the responders citizenship in the U.S. Activists called on the courts to act because the question was designed to deprive states and cities from federal funds based on the president’s biases. The fear it would create blocking immigrants from answering the census was unacceptable, according to the advocates.

Her work has left an indelible on those in politics who seek justice.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has promised to call a vote on the Senate floor for President Donald Trump’s nominee. Some Senators have come forward and called on the Senate to wait to vote on a nominee until after the election, which is on Nov. 3. The announcement by Sen. McConnell goes against what he claimed in 2016 after Justice Antonin Scalia died.

“The American people should have a voice in the selection of their next Supreme Court justice,” Sen. McConnell said the day Scalia died. “Therefore, this vacancy should not be filled until we have a new president.”

May her memory be a blessing.

How did you feel when you learned that Ruth Bader Ginsburg died? Let us know in the comments below.

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