Things That Matter

Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo Are The Women Fighting To Find The Stolen Children During The Argentine Dictatorship

During the 1970s a group of desperate Argentinian mothers began protesting government officials and holding them accountable for the human rights violations that had been committed in the military junta  known as the Dirty War. The determined women violated the government’s law against mass assembly and risked the ire of Argentina’s military dictatorship to expose the government’s human rights violations. The biggest part of their fight however had been to expose the kidnapping of over 30,000 individuals known today as “Desaparecidos” or “the disappeared.”

The Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo (or, the Asociación Madres de Plaza de Mayo) is a movement of Argentine mothers who campaigned to find out what happened to their children who had “disappeared” during the 1976 government takeover.

The mothers’ tragic stories began in 1976. At the time the Argentine military had toppled the presidency of Isabel Perón. According to History.com, “it was part of a larger series of political coups called Operation Condor, a campaign sponsored and supported by the United States.” The new military dictatorship resulted in the Dirty War, which was ultimately a fight against the Argentinian people. It opened doors to a period of state-sponsored torture and terrorism and saw the government turn against Argentina’s citizens, targeting those suspected of being aligned with leftist, socialist or social justice. As part of the rule of terror, the government kidnapped and killed an estimated 30,000 people. They also made great efforts to cover up the dead and missing people.

But the family members and friends of the missing victims fought for the truth.

The mothers and relatives of people who went missing during the war searched for their loved ones and began to stage protests at the Plaza de Mayo in the 1980s. 

According to History.com “Some of the mothers of the disappeared were grandmothers who had seen their daughters whisked away and presumably killed and their grandchildren given away to other families. Even after the Dirty War ended in 1983, the Grandmothers of the Plaza Mayo have searched for answers and worked to identify children who grew up without any knowledge of their true parents.”

Today the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo have verified the identities of 128 stolen children, thanks to DNA identification techniques but the fight of these mothers and grandmothers lives on. Sadly, thousands of Argentinian children remain missing.

The Mothers of Plaza de Mayo is a 1985 Argentine documentary film that highlights the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo.

At the time of its release, it was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature and in 2013, received an update on “Abuelas: Grandmothers on a Mission” which highlights the work of the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo in Argentina.

A Car Struck A Black Lives Matter Protester And Sped Off With Her On The Hood

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A Car Struck A Black Lives Matter Protester And Sped Off With Her On The Hood

Rodney C. Root/ Twitter

At a time when people should be lending an open ear and contributing to current cultural conversations, a 29-year-old Black Lives Matter protester from Bloomington, Indiana was injured on Monday after a car rammed into her and sped away with her on the hood of the car. As the car sped off, another man, 35, held on to the side of the car as it drove away.

A short clip of the incident was posted on Twitter and shows a red car driving off with the woman on the hood and the man hanging off of its side.

The incident captured by Rodney C. Root took place at the end of a protest march in Bloomington. The march was in response to claim by a Black man named Vauhxx Booker who said he was attacked by a group of white people who “attempted lynching” him. “At one point during the attack one of the men jumped on my neck,” Booker wrote on Facebook about the incident. “I could feel both his feet and his full bodyweight land hard against my neck.”

According to police, the incident at the protest may have escalated when the male passenger of the red car, a Toyota, threw an electric scooter left in the middle of the road.

According to Buzzfeed News the Bloomington Police Department said in a statement that the woman protestor, identified as Rachel Glago, approached the car and stood in front of it with her hands on the hood. When the car began to accelerate, the women jumped on the hood of the car and the man grabbed the car and clung on to its side. The two people clung to the car as it continued to speed down the road. When the car rapidly turned both the man and woman were thrown from the hood.

GoFundMe page for Rachel Glago’s medical expenses said she will be okay” but did have a concussion. The man involved had abrasions on his arms.

Police said the car has not been located as of yet but a male and female were in the car.

In an interview with RTV6, the man who clung to the side of the car, Geoff Stewart, said he and other protesters attempted to stop the car from driving while the road was being cleared up. “A woman driving the vehicle came up to the stop and had started revving her engine toward us and we tried to stop her and let her know that the crowd is clearing up, just wait a second,” Stewart said in the interview. “But she and her passenger both wanted to go right away so they started to push. They pushed into the woman that was with me, and when she pushed again, both of us went on the vehicle.”

“I was just trying to block her vision so she would slow down so I tried to pull myself as far in her way to obstruct her view. She drove through red lights and made her turn up here that threw both of us off the car,” Stewart said.

This 13-Year-Old Girl From Bakersfield, California Has Gone Missing

Things That Matter

This 13-Year-Old Girl From Bakersfield, California Has Gone Missing

BAKERSFIELD POLICE DEPARTMENT

On July 1, Patricia “Patty” Alatorre’s family reported her missing. According to the site Black and Missing, a total of 230,302 minorities out of 612,846 people were reported missing in the United States. We’re hoping this report ensures Alatorre won’t be another FBI’s statistic which has seen nearly 87,500 active missing persons on record each year.

According to the Bakersfield Police Department, Alatorre was last seen in Bakersfield at 11:30 pm.

Alatorre is described as being 5 foot, 90 pounds, with brown hair and brown eyes. She was last seen on Crescent Ridge Street near Hosking Avenue & Wible Road in Bakersfield. On Monday, police arrested Armando Cruz of Inglewood for his alleged involvement in Alatorre’s disappearance. He is a 24-year-old man from California and has been charged in connection with Alatorre’s disappearance and according to reports, perhaps her murder.

“Cruz was booked into Kern County Jail and charged with murder and sexual assault of a juvenile,” People.com reports and according to the Kern County Jail website he is being held without bail.

Earlier this week, detectives took a vehicle that matched the description of the suspicious truck that had been seen in the area at the time of Alatorre’s disappearance. The truck is a white pick-up.

Police have yet to reveal whether Alatorre’s remains have been found and Cruz has yet to enter a plea. Still, if you know anything about the case please be sure to contact Bakersfield police.

Bakersfield Police is urging the public with any information to contact Detective Ursery at 661-326-3871 or the Kern County Secret Witness hotline at 661-322-4040.