Things That Matter

Mother And Daughter Create Stock Market Workbook For Young Latino Kids

Financial literacy is an important part of creating a stable adult life. There are several ways to get there and one of the most abstract is stocks. Playing the stock market has become increasingly popular among Americans wanting to invest and make passing income. Thankfully, a Latina mother/daughter duo has a workbook to start teaching Latino kids early.

Linda Garcia and her daughter Elizabeth Ruiz created a stock market workbook for the little ones.

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My daughter had an idea to turn my beginners stock market course into a children’s workbook 💚 This idea was born from an intention to normalize the stock market in our communities and begin our journey towards building generational wealth. This book is a potent little tool that will empower and introduce your children to investing! I am so proud of you @la.loma_ for what I believe to be a genius idea! I want to also acknowledge my students in the very first course I taught who asked for children’s resources. Elizabeth was in this class and sought out a solution to a need in our community that has not been met until today! Follow @growwithcolor 🌈 You can order your copy now on my daughter’s small business store or on Amazon. Link in bio!

A post shared by Linda García (@luzwarrior) on

The mother/daughter team came together to create an easy-to-understand workbook to breakdown the stock market to children. The workbook is a perfect release in the time of Covid. It is giving young Latinos a chance to start thinking about finances and how to protect themselves from economic woes in the future.

Ruiz and Garcia want the workbook to start a trend of generational wealth.

In an interview with WFAA, Garcia admits that she had to learn how to better handle her money as an adult. She explained that she spent her money with little foresight and it was a coworker of hers that convinced her to take her paycheck more seriously.

“I feel like it was divine, almost as if he was an angel,” Garcia told WFAA. “He would come to my desk every single day, and he would show me his portfolio, he would show me his gains, and he would ask me, ‘Have you started investing?’ I was terrified.”

Ruiz and Garcia understand that this kind of early exposure to finances can help shape habits.

“Learning about the stock market is truly like learning a new language,” Ruiz told Brit+Co.

A lot of people in our community have watched parents struggle with finances and, in turn, we know very little. Ruiz and Garcia want to make sure that this workbook creates more than just enough change for one generation. Instead, the mother/daughter duo want to create a last change that is passed down from generation to generation.

It is time to end the scarcity mentality we hold around money to create lasting change.

“As long as we are American Citizens or Dreamers with an ITIN, we can open a brokerage account to begin buying and selling shares,” Garcia told Brit+Co. “And when it comes to building generational wealth, it’s far from handing over what you built in your lifetime. The real purpose is to find a way for the wealth to continue to grow and thrive for generations to come.”

READ: We Asked People About Retirement Savings And The Answers Will Shock You

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Latinas Are Offering Advice To Undocumented Women, New Moms And Those Who Are Struggling On How To Receive Affordable Therapy

Fierce

Latinas Are Offering Advice To Undocumented Women, New Moms And Those Who Are Struggling On How To Receive Affordable Therapy

ClassicStock / Getty

Finding the best psychologist or mental health worker for you isn’t an easy feat.

For one, finding someone you feel you can trust enough to open up to about your insecurities and inner turmoils is hard enough but finding someone who is covered by your health insurance can be even more difficult. On top of that, factors like location and time often come into play. Women of color in particular face a certain type of challenge when it comes to mental health care. According to the American Psychological Association, just 5.3% of psychologists in the United States are Black. Eighty-three percent are white. This means finding a mental health provider who can connect with your personal experiences can be beyond difficult.

We asked our users on Fierce for mental health provider tips and received some pretty inciteful answers.

Check them out below!


“Ask about sliding scales (cost based on income), check with insurance provider, apply for government-funded health care benefits, seek support from your child’s school—can refer you to a provider, college students can ask about on-campus services, workplace can also direct you to resources. Being resourceful is so important especially when it comes to our well-being. Hope this helps.” –karinalizlu

“Just started BetterHelp and they offer financial assistance. Got matched with the first therapist that I actually like after 10 years of trying. Highly recommend!”-marilynscarlet

“Ask your HR department if they have an Employment Assistance Program. If they do it means that the employer covers a certain amount of sessions with a therapist, counselor, psychologist, etc. which means you pay nothing for those first few sessions. Some EAP’s also cover the first meeting with financial advisors, lawyers & a bunch of other things!”- dee_anes

“I agree! So many times I’ve needed therapy but I couldn’t afford it. I’ve had to use what I got.” –ladinesphotographypage

“TherapyForBlackGirls.com has a great directory for BIPOC and POC!”-eileen.the.machine

“BetterHelp and SimplePractice are remote licensed therapist that offer sliding scale as low as $75 a session.”-rocio_rami5
“Some insurances are covering copays on sessions because of the pandemic! Check with your insurance!”- b_diaz990

“If your insurance includes Teledoc, each therapy session is $5 out of pocket. Yes it’s virtual, but everything else is right now! I truly appreciate my therapist and I’m grateful it’s not $40 a session like it used to be.”- livsimplyfl

“BetterHelp offers financial assistance.” –yessikahwamiwez

“Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is a good nationwide starting point: https://www.samhsa.gov.” – karinalizlu

“Check healingconnections-Therapy.com/blog. I’m a therapist and wrote a post on the accessibility of therapy. There’s therapy for every price point!” – gyera19

“Yes!!! 1000%. Many community colleges and universities have resources as part of student services. You can start there if you’re a student. Or reach out to a local therapist and ask if they know of local low cost options.” –runeatrepeat

“Federally qualified health care centers many times they offer counseling on a sliding fee scale!” –amor805

“If in Cali: reach out to Department of Mental Health. (DMH). If your child is under the age of 15 they can provide respite services. This is to help get a diagnosis or help families who have a child with a diagnosis.”- 143kimberly

“Hello! I am a graduate counseling student about to have my M.Ed in professional mental health counseling. Some long time friends and I have started a small business, and we’d love you to follow us along on our journey as well!” –mindful_resolutions4u

“We are Mindful Resolutions, a holistic wellness company that creates affordable courses based on the 8 dimensional model of wellness! Our goal is to bring wellness/mental health education and coping skills to people who wouldn’t normally be able to access or afford therapy, or for those who want an additional resource. A course is only $49.99 compared to $80 or more for an average therapy session!”- Mindful Resolutions


“Open season is coming up! Time to review your healthcare costs and make sure your insurance meets your needs. If there are barriers to preventing you from affording health insurance, check out state or local Medicaid and ACÁ options.” –brittsticks

@openpathpsychotherapy has sessions from $30-$60 and a wide selection of therapists that you can select based on their intersections (race, gender, etc) and what they specialize in.” –gangstahippie04


@backtalkservices has been a great resource for providing BIPOC LGBTQ folx with therapy.”- tytanjames

@openpathpsychotherapy one time membership fee then you can see a therapist for less than $60 a session. However much you and the therapist agree to. Highly recommend!” –mssantoyo

“Check out Therapists on @openpathpsychotherapy1w.” –therapy.girl

“For essential workers in California, therapy is being provided for free through www.covid19counselingca.com. @latinxtherapy is offering free therapy to farm workers and janitorial workers currently working in hospital settings anywhere in the US. And finally, for all others, @openpathpsychotherapy offers low cost therapy throughout the US.” –julimuli246

@contigo_wellness Nonprofit created to help make therapy more accessible!” –angelrod8032

@fiercebymitu we host free virtual Pranic Healing nights every Tuesday from 7:30pm to 10pm. The participant will enjoy twenty five minutes of energy healing focused on reducing stress, anxiety and tension. Please dm me for more info.”-marcelaarrietaofficial

@marinalcsw if you have any recommendations.”- leeladm

@therapyforlatinx has an incredible database of therapists!”- diosa_yesi

“Free therapy for undocumented youth through @immigrantsrising1w.” –yessbianca

“Affordable mental health care is important, but what about the wait times? My mother tried to get therapy but had to wait 6months before getting a session. This was BEFORE the pandemic. When affordable is important, so is wait time.”- hannibelle_

@fiercebymitu Cannabis can be used to check in and get a mental break. @calibueno.co we bring clean cannabis to diverse communities in the SF Bays area.” –calibueno.co

“If you’re in austin, tx there is sliding scale therapy and psychiatric care they austin Travis county integral care.” –ernipie

“National Sexual Assault/Domestic Violence Hotlines like 1-800-656-4673 (HOPE) can connect Survivors with local centers that offer many services—some include therapists and psychiatrists for medication, as well.” –godwasawoman

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

If You’ve Been Struggling with College During COVID, These Tips Might Help You Cope

Things That Matter

If You’ve Been Struggling with College During COVID, These Tips Might Help You Cope

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Covid-19 is changing the all-American college experience. There is no more late-night munchie runs at 3 a.m., house party hopping, or late-night cramming with friends in the library. The spirit has completely changed, but all for the greater good of keeping others healthy and safe.

Still, that doesn’t discredit the fact that we are losing the value of our education by it moving online. We’re no longer able to use the campus as a resource to help fuel ourselves academically or socially. We long for the day we are able to build a sense of community again.

Here’s how Covid has changed the college experience and what you can do to make it better.

The Move to Online

Credit: @gph/ Giphy

Being a college senior myself, remote learning has taken a huge toll on me. My days are lengthened with logging on to Zoom for everything, and yes- even my pair of blue-light glasses can’t keep me focused.

I find myself eagerly waiting for my professor to say “That’s it for today everyone,” and sometimes can only hang in there for half of the time. I’m constantly left feeling anxious and frustrated.

I was sure that universities would begin to understand how different students cope with a very tricky, unstable, and scary situation at hand. However, I’ve experienced the opposite. An overwhelming influx of papers, online assignments, and weekly quizzes quickly presented themselves. Not to mention more group projects. Weekends soon became “working-weekends” and with assignments piling up I truly felt like I was drowning.

It wasn’t long until I had to think for myself. How am I going to cope with the now? I needed to figure out the best plan I could to navigate something out of mine and everyone else’s control. If you too are struggling during this time whether it be financially, academically, emotionally, etc, please know you are not alone. Below are some resources that might help each day go by just a little better than the last, and hopefully give you peace of mind.

Finances:

COVID Emergency Assistance Funds

The last thing that we want to do is pay full price for online learning, especially during a pandemic. So check with your college or university about COVID Emergency Assistance/Relief Funds. This has greatly helped students access resources such as food, housing, course materials, technology, and affordable health care. In some cases, they even pay you to be at home. Additionally, FAFSA is allowing students to get even more aid granted despite if they were already given their semester disbursement- so it’s definitely worth checking out.

Visit your official college website & https://studentaid.gov/h/apply-for-aid/fafsa for more information.

Scholarships

Trust me, we all could use a little help in this area. Luckily, Tuition Funding Sources’s (TFS) database connects students to monthly scholarships based on needs, wants, and qualifications. They have highlighted “scholarships of the day” as well as career aptitude tests that can help your search become even more personal.

Businesses are also partnering up right now to help students around the world get the support they need to further their education. The McDonald’s® HACER ® National Scholarship assists Latino students to be front and center and attain the education they deserve. In 2019, more than $500,000 was granted to 30 students in order to help finance tuition costs. And better yet, The 2020-2021 application period just opened October 5th.

For more information on how to apply for the listed scholarships, visit https://www.tuitionfundingsources.com  or https://www.mcdonalds.com/us/en-us/community/hacer.html .

Mental Health & Well-Being:

Headspace

This app is a lifesaver. From brief wellbeing exercises to longer guided meditation, Headspace is offering free downloadable tracks that can help you ease your mind at home or on-the-go anywhere and anytime. Tune in when you need a break or to re-center yourself.  

Visit https://www.headspace.com/covid-19 to see what tracks are available now.

Podcasts

Sometimes hearing someone speak and having an honest conversation about a certain topic is really fun to engage with. It provides us another perspective other than their are own, and it’s interesting to get a glimpse at the way other people live. Taking 30 minutes out of your day to listen to an episode can help ease some stress, reminding you that others are by your side who, too, have felt the same chaos.

For a great selection of podcasts, search Spotify or Apple Podcasts to start the search on some good series.

Be Patient with Yourself

Credit: @nbc/ Giphy

Remember, this pandemic is not forever although it might feel like it right now. Do not feel like you are responsible for the frustration you are undergoing. Take some time to care for yourself and take a step back from the craziness of the world to remind yourself that things will get better.

Talk to a friend, counselor, or therapist if you find yourself in a crisis more than you can bear. Crisis Text Line offers free, 24/7 service to anyone who needs some support and wants to speak with someone. What’s nice is you have the option to either call or text, depending on what’s most comfortable and effective for you. 

Visit https://www.crisistextline.org to get free 24/7 support whenever, wherever. 

Other Tips

Zoom Party

Credit: @snl / Giphy

Get-togethers are looking a lot different right now, but you can still plan an event that will keep all of your friends together. Zoom can be a wonderful platform not only for the classroom, but to catch up with everyone. Plan a “Whine Night” where you talk about all things life or vibe to shared music. Your university should give you an unlimited personal meeting room link so you don’t have to pay a dime for the time.

Virtual Social Hours

Many universities are offering virtual social hours so students can connect to each other and get more of a sense of community as we navigate through the days. Check online on your school’s website to see what types of activities they are offering students at this time, and what events might fit your personal or career interests.  You never know who you might meet!

Find Your Hobby 

Having a go-to hobby during this time can give you something to look forward to and be an escape from all the ongoing chaos. Look into things like surfing, socially distanced yoga classes, cooking, or hiking to get you feeling joyful and inspired. Try one thing out and see if you like it, and if not who says you can’t just move to the next thing? You’ll be surprised at what you discover will be your next “thing.”


The pandemic has definitely made college life and life, in general, a whole lot harder. Know that it is completely normal to feel mad, sad, scared, or anxious about what’s to come. With these tips, my only wish is that they help you cope just a bit more as they have for me. Together we will get through this, slowly but surely.

READ: A 13-Year-Old Student Just Became A California College’s Youngest Graduate

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